Results for 'Physician assisted suicide'

247 found
Order:
  1. Gonzales V. Oregon and Physician-Assisted Suicide: Ethical and Policy Issues.Ken Levy - 2007 - Tulsa Law Review 42:699-729.
    The euthanasia literature typically discusses the difference between “active” and “passive” means of ending a patient’s life. Physician-assisted suicide differs from both active and passive forms of euthanasia insofar as the physician does not administer the means of suicide to the patient. Instead, she merely prescribes and dispenses them to the patient and lets the patient “do the rest” – if and when the patient chooses. One supposed advantage of this process is that it maximizes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Is the Exclusion of Psychiatric Patients From Access to Physician-Assisted Suicide Discriminatory?Joshua James Hatherley - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (12):817-820.
    Advocates of physician-assisted suicide often argue that, although the provision of PAS is morally permissible for persons with terminal, somatic illnesses, it is impermissible for patients suffering from psychiatric conditions. This claim is justified on the basis that psychiatric illnesses have certain morally relevant characteristics and/or implications that distinguish them from their somatic counterparts. In this paper, I address three arguments of this sort. First, that psychiatric conditions compromise a person’s decision-making capacity. Second, that we cannot have (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3. The Case for Physician Assisted Suicide: How Can It Possibly Be Proven?Edgar Dahl & Neil Levy - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (6):335-338.
    In her paper, The case for physician assisted suicide: not proven, Bonnie Steinbock argues that the experience with Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act fails to demonstrate that the benefits of legalising physician assisted suicide outweigh its risks. Given that her verdict is based on a small number of highly controversial cases that will most likely occur under any regime of legally implemented safeguards, she renders it virtually impossible to prove the case for physician (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4. THE MAXIM OF SUICIDE: ONE ANGLE ON BIOMEDICAL ETHICS.Yusuke Kaneko - 2012 - ASIAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES and HUMANITIES 1 (3).
    Addressing the question in the form of Kant’s maxim, this paper moves on to a more controversial topic in biomedical ethics, physician-assisted suicide. However, my conclusion is tentative, and what is worse, negative: I partially approve suicide. It does not imply a moral hazard. The situation is opposite: in the present times, terminal patients seriously wish it. I, as an author, put an emphasis on this very respect. Now suicide is, for certain circles, nothing but (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. In Incognito: The Principle of Double Effect in American Constitutional Law.Edward C. Lyons - 2005 - Florida Law Review 57 (3):469-563.
    Abstract: In Vacco v. Quill, 521 U.S. 793 (1997), the Supreme Court for the first time in American case law explicitly applied the principle of double effect to reject an equal protection claim to physician-assisted suicide. Double effect, traced historically to Thomas Aquinas, proposes that under certain circumstances it is permissible unintentionally to cause foreseen evil effects that would not be permissible to cause intentionally. The court rejected the constitutional claim on the basis of a distinction marked (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  65
    Za Etiku Bez Teologie.Tomáš HŘÍbek - 2010 - Filosoficky Casopis 58 (5):729-749.
    [For an Ethics without Theology] This study is a critical reflection on Marek Vácha's article on the ethics of euthanasia. In the first part the author offers a short consideration of the reasons for the moribund state of ethics in Czech philosophy, after which, in the second part, he presents a critique of Vácha's article. The article in question is, above all, lacking in a philosophical approach to the problem of euthanasia, and we find in it not so much arguments (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  48
    Ještě o etice eutanazie: odpovědi kritikům.Tomas Hribek - 2011 - Filosoficky Casopis 59 (6):911-931.
    [On the Ethics of Euthanasia Again: A Reply to Critics] The article is a reply to three critics of a previous piece on the ethics of euthanasia in which I defended physician-assisted suicide. According to Ingrid Strobachová it is necessary to give a greater attention to the significance of pain, which, she claims, may benefit from a phenomenological description. According to Marta Vlasáková my argument is not valid because two principles on which it is founded – i.e. (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  33
    Death, Medicine and the Right to Die: An Engagement with Heidegger, Bauman and Baudrillard.Thomas F. Tierney - 1997 - Body and Society 3 (4):51-77.
    The reemergence of the question of suicide in the medical context of physician-assisted suicide seems to me one of the most interesting and fertile facets of late modernity. Aside from the disruption which this issue may cause in the traditional juridical relationship between individuals and the state, it may also help to transform the dominant conception of subjectivity that has been erected upon modernity's medicalized order of death. To enhance this disruptive potential, I am going to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Review of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW]Craig Paterson - 2010 - Ethics and Medicine 26 (1):23-4.
    As medical technology advances and severely injured or ill people can be kept alive and functioning long beyond what was previously medically possible, the debate surrounding the ethics of end-of-life care and quality-of-life issues has grown more urgent. In this lucid and vigorous book, Craig Paterson discusses assisted suicide and euthanasia from a fully fledged but non-dogmatic secular natural law perspective. He rehabilitates and revitalises the natural law approach to moral reasoning by developing a pluralistic account of just (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide and the Professional Obligations of Physicians.Lucie White - 2010 - Emergent Australasian Philosophers 3:1-15.
    Euthanasia and assisted suicide have proved to be very contentious topics in medical ethics. Some ethicists are particularly concerned that allowing physicians to carry out these procedures will undermine their professional obligations and threaten the very goals of medicine. However, I maintain that the fundamental goals of medicine not only do not preclude the practice of euthanasia and assisted suicide by physicians, but can in fact be seen to support these practices in some instances. I look (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. A History of Ideas Concerning Suicide, Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia.Craig Paterson - manuscript
    The article examines from an historical perspective some of the key ideas used in contemporary bioethics debates both for and against the practices of assisted suicide and euthanasia. Key thinkers examined--spanning the Ancient, Medieval and Modern periods--include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Hume, Kant, and Mill. The article concludes with a synthesizing summary of key ideas that oppose or defend assisted suicide and euthanasia.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. What is a Death with Dignity?Jyl Gentzler - 2003 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (4):461 – 487.
    Proponents of the legalization of assisted suicide often appeal to our supposed right to "die with dignity" to defend their case. I examine and assess different notions of "dignity" that are operating in many arguments for the legalization of assisted suicide, and I find them all to be deficient. I then consider an alternative conception of dignity that is based on Aristotle's conception of the conditions on the best life. I conclude that, while such a conception (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  13. Paterson, Craig: Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW]Susanna Maria Taraschi - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (3):245-247.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  54
    PHYSICIAN ASSISTED DYING: DEFINING THE ETHICALLY AMBIGUOUS.Chandler O'Leary - 2018 - Aletheia, The Undergraduate Journal of Philosophy at Texas AandM 1:18-26.
    In states where Physician Assisted Dying (PAD) is legal, physicians occasionally receive requests for this form of end-of-life care. Here, I describe the ethically ambiguous sphere and why PAD falls into it. I argue that, given the ethical ambiguity of PAD, physicians should consider patient autonomy as the highest value in the four principles approach and act as informers and educators.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Craig Paterson - Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach. [REVIEW]Glenys Williams - 2009 - King's Law Journal 20 (3):553-8.
    Extended review of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Natural Law Ethics Approach by Craig Paterson. Ashgate, 2008.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  94
    The Case for an Autonomy-Centered View of Physician-Assisted Death.Jeremy Davis & Eric Mathison - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    Most people who defend physician-assisted death (PAD) endorse the Joint View, which holds that two conditions—autonomy and welfare—must be satisfied for PAD to be justified. In this paper, we defend an Autonomy Only view. We argue that the welfare condition is either otiose on the most plausible account of the autonomy condition, or else is implausibly restrictive, particularly once we account for the broad range of reasons patients cite for desiring PAD, such as “tired of life” cases. Moreover, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Suicide, Euthanasia and Human Dignity.Friderik Klampfer - 2001 - Acta Analytica 27:7-34.
    Kant has famously argued that human beings or persons, in virtue of their capacity for rational and autonomous choice and agency, possess dignity, which is an intrinsic, final, unconditional, inviolable, incomparable and irreplaceable value. This value, wherever found, commands respect and imposes rather strict moral constraints on our deliberations, intentions and actions. This paper deals with the question of whether, as some Kantians have recently argued, certain types of (physician-assisted) suicide and active euthanasia, most notably the intentional (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Die Freiheit Zum Tode: Ein Plädoyer Für den Ärztlich-Assistierten Suizid.Edgar Dahl - 2015 - Aufklärung Und Kritik 2:130-135.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  76
    Auf Leben Und Tod.Edgar Dahl - 2010 - Gehirn and Geist 7:64.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  58
    Dem Tod zur Hand gehen.Edgar Dahl - 2006 - Spektrum der Wissenschaft 2006 (7):116-120.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. What is the Great Benefit of Legalizing Euthanasia or Physican‐Assisted Suicide?Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 1999 - Ethics 109 (3):629-642.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  22. Everyday Attitudes About Euthanasia and the Slippery Slope Argument.Adam Feltz - 1st ed. 2015 - In Jukka Varelius & Michael Cholbi (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Springer Verlag.
    This chapter provides empirical evidence about everyday attitudes concerning euthanasia. These attitudes have important implications for some ethical arguments about euthanasia. Two experiments suggested that some different descriptions of euthanasia have modest effects on people’s moral permissibility judgments regarding euthanasia. Experiment 1 (N = 422) used two different types of materials (scenarios and scales) and found that describing euthanasia differently (‘euthanasia’, ‘aid in dying’, and ‘physician assisted suicide’) had modest effects (≈3 % of the total variance) on (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. Adherence to the Request Criterion in Jurisdictions Where Assisted Dying Is Lawful? A Review of the Criteria and Evidence in the Netherlands, Belgium, Oregon, and Switzerland.Penney Lewis & Isra Black - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):885-898.
    Some form of assisted dying (voluntary euthanasia and/or assisted suicide) is lawful in the Netherlands, Belgium, Oregon, and Switzerland. In order to be lawful in these jurisdictions, a valid request must precede the provision of assistance to die. Non-adherence to the criteria for valid requests for assisted dying may be a trigger for civil and/or criminal liability, as well as disciplinary sanctions where the assistor is a medical professional. In this article, we review the criteria and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Reporting and Scrutiny of Reported Cases in Four Jurisdictions Where Assisted Dying is Lawful: A Review of the Evidence in the Netherlands, Belgium, Oregon and Switzerland.Penney Lewis & Isra Black - 2013 - Medical Law International 13 (4):221-239.
    This article examines the reporting requirements in four jurisdictions in which assisted dying (euthanasia and/or assisted suicide) is legally regulated: the Netherlands, Belgium, Oregon and Switzerland. These jurisdictions were chosen because each had a substantial amount of empirical evidence available. We assess the available empirical evidence on reporting and what it tells us about the effectiveness of such requirements in encouraging reporting. We also look at the nature of requirements on regulatory bodies to refer cases not meeting (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  37
    Dignity and Assisted Dying: What Kant Got Right (and Wrong).Michael Cholbi - 2018 - In Human Dignity and Assisted Death. pp. 143-160.
    That Kant’s moral thought is invoked by both advocates and opponents of a right to assisted dying attests to both the allure and and the elusiveness of Kant’s moral thought. In particular, the theses that individuals have a right to a ‘death with dignity’ and that assisting someone to die contravenes her dignity appear to gesture at one of Kant’s signature moral notions, dignity. The purposes of this article are to outline Kant’s understanding of dignity and its implications for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  53
    Palliation and Medically Assisted Dying: A Case Study in the Use of Slippery Slope Arguments in Public Policy.Michael Cholbi - 2018 - In David Boonin (ed.), Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 691-702.
    Opponents of medically assisted dying have long appealed to ‘slippery slope’ arguments. One such slippery slope concerns palliative care: That the introduction of medically assisted dying will lead to a diminution in the quality or availability or palliative care for patients near the end of their lives. Empirical evidence from jurisdictions where assisted dying has been practiced for decades, such as Oregon and the Netherlands, indicate that such worries are largely unfounded. The failure of the palliation slope (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  75
    Utilitarianismus, nacismus a eutanazie.Tomas Hribek - 2012 - Filosoficky Casopis 60 (6):899-908.
    [Utilitarism, Nazism, and Euthanasia] The article is an answer to Prof. Munzarová who criticised my defence of physician-assisted suicide. The article points to shortcomings in the reply of prof. Munzarová which flow from the author’s underestimation of normative theory. Among these shortcomings are the ignoring of the arguments of her opponent; her calling into question the moral credit of the proponents of the competing theory (utilitarianism) rather than a critical analysis; unclear theoretical principles (a switching between paternalism (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Medically Enabled Suicides.Michael Cholbi - 2015 - In M. Cholbi J. Varelius (ed.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Springer. pp. 169-184.
    What I call medically enabled suicides have four distinctive features: 1. They are instigated by actions of a suicidal individual, actions she intends to result in a physiological condition that, absent lifesaving medical interventions, would be otherwise fatal to that individual. 2. These suicides are ‘completed’ due to medical personnel acting in accordance with recognized legal or ethical protocols requiring the withholding or withdrawal of care from patients (e.g., following an approved advance directive). 3. The suicidal individual acts purposefully to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Suicide Assistance for Mentally Disordered Individuals in Switzerland and the State's Positive Obligation to Facilitate Dignified Suicide.Isra Black - 2012 - Medical Law Review 20 (1):157-166.
    Commentary on the European Court of Human Rights judgment in Haas v Switzerland.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30.  80
    Deep Uncertainties in the Criteria for Physician Aid-in-Dying for Psychiatric Patients.Piotr Grzegorz Nowak & Tomasz Żuradzki - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):54-56.
    In their insightful article, Brent Kious and Margaret Battin (2019) correctly identify an inconsistency between an involuntary psychiatric commitment for suicide prevention and physician aid in dying (PAD). They declare that it may be possible to resolve the problem by articulating “objective standards for evaluating the severity of others’ suffering,” but ultimately they admit that this task is beyond the scope of their article since the solution depends on “a deep and difficult” question about comparing the worseness of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. Eutanasia y subjetividad.Andrés Páez - 1998 - Ideas Y Valores 47 (108):18-30.
    Con el fin de examinar los aspectos exclusivamente morales del suicidio asistido y la eutanasia activa voluntaria, el análisis debe ser llevado a cabo independientemente de la función social de los agentes involucrados, de la opinión de los familiares del paciente terminal y del público en general, y de las consecuencias legales de dichas acciones. En consecuencia, en el presente ensayo se analiza un imaginario caso neutral, aislado del contexto natural de la eutanasia y el suicidio asistido. Utilizando un principio (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. When Life is Ending..Caroline Ong - 2014 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 20 (2):5.
    Ong, Caroline In the debate about euthanasia, it is important that we consider all views, including those which might not at first seem attractive to us. Whether we believe in God or not, the views of the Catholic Church make a significant contribution to this debate. The Church does not support the deliberate killing either of oneself or another person. It also emphasises our moral obligation to respect life and to uphold the dignity of each person.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. The Effectiveness of Legal Safeguards in Jurisdictions That Allow Assisted Dying.Penney J. Lewis & Isra Black - 2012 - In Briefing Paper for the Commission on Assisted Dying. Demos.
    Evidence from jurisdictions that allow assisted dying is frequently used in the debate about assisted dying in the UK, since it provides important information about how assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia work in practice. However, in order to interpret these data meaningfully, it is essential that they are understood in the context of the different legal and regulatory frameworks in operation in these countries. -/- The Commission on Assisted Dying has commissioned this expert briefing paper (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  96
    Autonomy and End of Life Decisions: A Paradox.Ben Colburn - 2013 - In Juha Räikkä & Jukka Varelius (eds.), Adaptation and Autonomy: Adaptive Preferences in Enhancing and Ending Life. Springer. pp. 69--80.
    Suppose that we think it important that people have the chance to enjoy autonomous lives. An obvious corollary of this thought is that people should, if they want it, have control over the time and manner of their deaths, either ending their own lives, or by securing the help of others in doing so. So, generally, and even if we overall think that the practice should not be legalized on other grounds, it looks like common sense to think that considerations (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. The Morality of Euthanasia.Adam Greif - forthcoming - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu.
    In this paper, I defend the view that the requested euthanasia of adults is morally permissible and should be legalised; I use an argument from analogy which compares physician-assisted euthanasia with morally less ambiguous and, in my opinion, an acceptable instance of mercy killing. I also respond to several objections that either try to prove that the instance of mercy killing is not acceptable, or that there is a fundamental difference between these two cases of killing. Furthermore, in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. The Future of Death: Cryonics and the Telos of Liberal Individualism.James Hughes - 2001 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 6 (1).
    This paper addresses five questions: First, what is trajectory of Western liberal ethics and politics in defining life, rights and citizenship? Second, how will neuro-remediation and other technologies change the definition of death for the brain injured and the cryonically suspended? Third, will people always have to be dead to be cryonically suspended? Fourth, how will changing technologies and definitions of identity affect the status of people revived from brain injury and cryonic suspension? I propose that Western liberal thought is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37. Managing Intentions: The End-of-Life Administration of Analgesics and Sedatives, and the Possibility of Slow Euthanasia.Charles Douglas, Ian Kerridge & Rachel Ankeny - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (7):388-396.
    There has been much debate regarding the 'double-effect' of sedatives and analgesics administered at the end-of-life, and the possibility that health professionals using these drugs are performing 'slow euthanasia.' On the one hand analgesics and sedatives can do much to relieve suffering in the terminally ill. On the other hand, they can hasten death. According to a standard view, the administration of analgesics and sedatives amounts to euthanasia when the drugs are given with an intention to hasten death. In this (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  38. No King and No Torture: Kant on Suicide and Law.Jennifer Uleman - 2016 - Kantian Review 21 (1):77-100.
    Kant’s most canonical argument against suicide, the universal law argument, is widely dismissed. This paper attempts to save it, showing that a suicide maxim, universalized, undermines all bases for practical law, resisting both the non-negotiable value of free rational willing and the ordinary array of sensuous commitments that inform prudential incentives. Suicide therefore undermines moral law governed community as a whole, threatening ‘savage disorder’. In pursuing this argument, I propose a non-teleological and non-theoretical nature – a ‘practical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  25
    Psychological Aposematism: An Evolutionary Analysis of Suicide.James C. Wiley - 2020 - Biological Theory:1-13.
    The evolutionary advantage of psychological phenomena can be gleaned by comparing them with physical traits that have proven adaptive in other organisms. The present article provides a novel evolutionary explanation of suicide in humans by comparing it with aposematism in insects. Aposematic insects are brightly colored, making them conspicuous to predators. However, such insects are equipped with toxins that cause a noxious reaction when eaten. Thus, the death of a few insects conditions predators to avoid other insects of similar (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Kantian Paternalism and Suicide Intervention.Michael Cholbi - 2013 - In Christian Coons Michael Weber (ed.), Paternalism: Theory and Practice. Cambridge University Press.
    Defends Kantian paternalism: Interference with an individual’s liberty for her own sake is justified absent her actual consent only to the extent that such interference stands a reasonable chance of preventing her from exercising her liberty irrationally in light of the rationally chosen ends that constitute her conception of the good. More specifically, interference with an individual’s liberty is permissible only if, by interfering, we stand a reasonable chance of preventing that agent from performing actions she chose due to distorted (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  41. Kant on Capital Punishment and Suicide.Attila Ataner - 2006 - Kant-Studien 97 (4):452-482.
    From a juridical standpoint, Kant ardently upholds the state's right to impose the death penalty in accordance with the law of retribution. At the same time, from an ethical standpoint, Kant maintains a strict proscription against suicide. The author proposes that this latter position is inconsistent with and undercuts the former. However, Kant's division between external (juridical) and internal (moral) lawgiving is an obstacle to any argument against Kant's endorsement of capital punishment based on his own disapprobation of (...). Nevertheless, Kant's basic conception of autonomy underlies both of these otherwise distinct forms of lawgiving, such that acts of suicide and capital punishment are rendered equally irrational within his overall framework. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  42.  99
    Computer-Assisted Argument Mapping: A Rationale Approach.Martin Davies - 2009 - Higher Education 58:799-820.
    Computer-Assisted Argument Mapping (CAAM) is a new way of understanding arguments. While still embryonic in its development and application, CAAM is being used increasingly as a training and development tool in the professions and government. Inroads are also being made in its application within education. CAAM claims to be helpful in an educational context, as a tool for students in responding to assessment tasks. However, to date there is little evidence from students that this is the case. This paper (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  43. Animal Suicide: An Account Worth Giving? Commentary on Peña-Guzmán on Animal Suicide.Irina Mikhalevich - 2018 - Animal Sentience 20 (19).
    Peña-Guzmán (2017) argues that empirical evidence and evolutionary theory compel us to treat the phenomenon of suicide as continuous in the animal kingdom. He defends a “continuist” account in which suicide is a multiply-realizable phenomenon characterized by self-injurious and self-annihilative behaviors. This view is problematic for several reasons. First, it appears to mischaracterize the Darwinian view that mind is continuous in nature. Second, by focusing only on surface-level features of behavior, it groups causally and etiologically disparate phenomena under (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Can Doctors Maintain Good Character? An Examination of Physician Lives.Saba Fatima - 2016 - Journal of Medical Humanities 37 (4):419-433.
    Can doctors maintain good character? This paper shifts the focus from patient care to ethical considerations that bear on the physician and impact her as a person. By decentering patient care, the paper highlights certain factors that habituate a particular way of reasoning that is not conducive to inculcating good character. Such factors include, standards of professionalism, being influenced by external monitors, and emphasis on adherence to guidelines. While such factors may benefit patients, they often adversely affect the character (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. What About Suicide Bombers? A Terse Response to a Terse Objection.Marc Champagne - 2011 - Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 11 (2):233–236.
    Stressing that the pronoun "I" picks out one and only one person in the world (i.e., me), I argue against Hunt (and other like-minded Rand commentators) that the supposed "hard case" of destructive people who do not care for their own lives poses no special difficulty for rational egoism. I conclude that the proper response to a terse objection like "What about suicide bombers?" is the equally terse assertion "But I don't want to get blown up.".
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Physician Emigration, Population Health and Public Policies.A. Bhargava - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (10):616-618.
    This brief commentary reappraises the issue of emigration of physicians from developing countries to developed countries. A methodological framework is developed for assessing the impact of physician emigration on population health outcomes. The evidence from macro and micro studies suggest that developing countries especially in sub-Saharan Africa would benefit from regulating physician emigration because the loss of physicians can lower quality of healthcare services and lead to worse health outcomes. Further discussion is contained in an e-letter: http://jme.bmj.com/content/early/2013/05/30/medethics-2013-101409/reply.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  33
    Partial Trajectory: The Story of the Altered Nuclear Transfer-Oocyte Assisted Reprogramming (ANT-OAR) Proposal.W. Malcolm Byrnes - 2007 - Linacre Quarterly 1 (74):50-59.
    This essay aims to tell the story of the “altered nuclear transfer-oocyte assisted reprogramming,” or ANT-OAR, proposal—from its conception by Professor William Hurlbut of the President’s Council on Bioethics—to its adoption and promotion by a group of conservative, mostly Catholic philosophers, theologians and scientists—to its eventual demise in Congress. It also will give some reflections on how ANT-OAR promotes a genetically deterministic view of the human organism and can lead down a slippery slope into a future in which human (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  56
    Twisted Pictures: Morality, Nihilism and Symbolic Suicide in the Saw Series.Steve Jones - 2013 - In James Aston & John Walliss (eds.), To See the Saw Movies: Essays on Torture Porn and Post-9/11 Horror. McFarland. pp. 105-122.
    Given that numerous critics have complained about Saw’s apparently confused sense of ethics, it is surprising that little attention has been paid to how morality operates in narrative itself. Coming from a Nietzschean perspective - specifically questioning whether the lead torturer Jigsaw is a passive or a radical nihilist - I seek to rectify that oversight. This philosophical reading of the series explores Jigsaw’s moral stance, which is complicated by his hypocrisy: I contend that this underpins critical complaints regarding the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  42
    Until the End of Time.Sulamit Arteaga - manuscript
    When terminally ill patients have had enough suffering they often turn to euthanasia. The Assisted suicide is still unethical and illegal in most countries. As of now it is practiced in the Netherlands but still considered illegal. The few that still use euthanasia have to go through a certain legal route. Often patients have had enough and find it easier to take matter into their own hands or in this case let the doctors help in assisting with ending (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  89
    Palliation and Medically Assisted Dying: A Case Study in the Use of Slippery Slope Arguments in Public Policy.Michael Cholbi - 2018 - In David Boonin (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Springer Verlag. pp. 691-702.
    Opponents of medically assisted dying have long appealed to ‘slippery slope’ arguments. One such slippery slope concerns palliative care: that the introduction of medically assisted dying will lead to a diminution in the quality or availability or palliative care for patients near the end of their lives. Empirical evidence from jurisdictions where assisted dying has been practiced for decades, such as Oregon and the Netherlands, indicate that such worries are largely unfounded. The failure of the palliation slope (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 247