Results for 'Plato and Freud'

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  1. Plato’s Psychology of Action and the Origin of Agency.Florin George Calian - 2012 - In Peter Šajda (ed.), Affectivity, Agency and Intersubjectivity. L'Harmattan. pp. 9-22.
    In the Republic, IV, Plato divides the soul into three parts, which can be translated as three probable origins of agency. The soul is the agent of both rational agency and non-rational agency. How is it possible for the soul to have contradictory aims, and act? In order to survey a possible answer, the paper gives an outline of the relation between soul and agency, agency and its threefold origin, and the resemblance of Plato’s theory of soul to (...)
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  2. Psiche: Platone e Freud. Desiderio, Sogno, Mania, Eros (pdf: indice, prefazione Vegetti, introduzione, capitolo I).Marco Solinas - 2008 - Firenze University Press.
    Psiche sets up a close-knit comparison between the psychology of Plato's Republic and Freud's psychoanalysis. Convergences and divergences are discussed in relation both to the Platonic conception of the oneiric emergence of repressed desires that prefigures the main path of Freud's subconscious, to the analysis of the psychopathologies related to these theoretical formulations and to the two diagnostic and therapeutic approaches adopted. Another crucial theme is the Platonic eros - the examination of which is also extended to (...)
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  3. Unterdrückung, Traum und Unbewusstes in Platons „Politeia“ und bei Freud.Marco Solinas - 2004 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 111 (1):90-112.
    The essay concerns the reconstruction of the repression of desires, with reference to the analysis of their oneiric emersions expounded in the Republic, in comparison with Freud’s conception. Plato’s concept of suppression according to which specific desires are enslaved, so that they can find satisfaction usually only in dreams seems consistent with Freud’s concept of remotion; therefore both the condition of the suppressed desires and the intrapsychic place of their enslavement seem to be interpretable in the light (...)
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  4. Successors of Socrates, Disciples of Descartes, and Followers of Freud[REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 2001 - Apeiron 34 (2):181 - 193.
    All three books reviewed here are turning over again for us the pages of perennially irresistible thinkers whose ideas never cease to hold us transfixed; all three are inviting us to notice that the material that we thought we knew has got more to do with what Nehamas calls 'the art of living' than we might have realised; and all three are making space for attitudes, responses and areas of self-understanding that are, by traditional classifications, irrational and hence sometimes inadequately (...)
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  5. La riscoperta della via regia. Freud lettore di Platone.Marco Solinas - 2012 - Psicoterapia E Scienze Umane (4):539-568.
    Starting with the reference to “Plato’s dictum” that Freud added in the second last page of the first edition of The Interpretation of Dreams, the author explains the convergences between the conception of dreams expounded by Plato in the Republic and Freud’s fundamental insights. The analysis of bibliographic sources used by Freud, and of his interests, allow than to suppose not only that Freud omitted to acknowledge the Plato’s theoretical genealogy of “the Via (...)
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  6. Via Platonica zum Unbewussten. Platon und Freud (pdf: Inhaltszerzeichnis, Vegetti Vorwort, Einleitung).Marco Solinas - 2012 - Turia + Kant.
    Solinas’ Studie untersucht den Einfluss von Platons Anschauungen von Traum, Wunsch und Wahn auf den jungen Freud. Anhand der Untersuchung einiger zeitgenössischer kulturwissenschaftlicher Arbeiten, die bereits in die ersten Ausgabe der Traumdeutung Eingang fanden, wird Freuds nachhaltige Vertrautheit mit den platonischen Lehren erläutert und seine damit einhergehende direkte Textkenntnis der thematisch relevanten Stellen aus Platons Staat aufgezeigt. Die strukturelle Analogie von Freud’schem und platonischem Seelenbegriff wird inhaltlich am Traum als »Königsweg zum Unbewussten«, in dem von Freud selbst (...)
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  7. La sublimazione dell'eros. La "Repubblica" e Freud.Marco Solinas - 2007 - Chronos 25 (1):69-92.
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  8.  94
    The Drama of the Human Condition. Notes on the Causes and Origins of Evil in Plato’s Republic.Gianluigi Segalerba - 2019 - Revue Roumaine de Philosophie 63 (1):19-35.
    In my analysis I deal with some causes and origins of evil and of moral degeneration in the human dimension. My analysis focuses on Plato’s Republic. The origins and causes of the presence of injustice and of vice lie in the very structure of the human soul. The division of the soul into parts which are at least reciprocally independent of each other implies that there is the possibility that they are in conflict with each other. This is the (...)
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  9. Hysteria and Mechanical Man.John P. Wright - 1980 - Journal of the History of Ideas 41 (2):233.
    In this article I contrast 17th and 18th explanations of hysteria including those of Sydenham and Willis with those given by Plato and pre-modern medicine. I show that beginning in the second decade of the 17th century the locus of the disorder was transferred to the nervous system and it was no longer connected with the womb as in Hippocrates and Galen; hysteria became identified with hypochondria, and was a disease contracted by men as well as women. I discuss (...)
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  10.  17
    Art, Beauty and Morality.Chiara Brozzo & Andy Hamilton - forthcoming - In Mark Hopwood & Silvia Panizza (eds.), The Murdochian Mind.
    In this chapter, we examine Iris Murdoch’s views about art. We highlight continuities and differences between her views on art and aesthetics, and those of Plato, Kant, and Freud. We argue that Murdoch’s views about art, though traditionally linked to Plato, are more compatible with Kant’s thought than has been acknowledged—though with his ethics rather than his aesthetics. Murdoch shows Plato’s influence in her idea that beauty is the good in a different guise. However, Murdoch shows (...)
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  11. Varieties of Knowledge in Plato and Aristotle.Timothy Chappell - 2012 - Topoi 31 (2):175-190.
    I develop the relatively familiar idea of a variety of forms of knowledge —not just propositional knowledge but also knowledge -how and experiential knowledge —and show how this variety can be used to make interesting sense of Plato’s and Aristotle’s philosophy, and in particular their ethics. I then add to this threefold analysis of knowledge a less familiar fourth variety, objectual knowledge, and suggest that this is also interesting and important in the understanding of Plato and Aristotle.
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  12. Plato and the Dangerous Pleasures of Poikilia.Jonathan Fine - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):152-169.
    A significant strand of the ethical psychology, aesthetics and politics of Plato's Republic revolves around the concept of poikilia, ‘fascinating variety’. Plato uses the concept to caution against harmful appetitive pleasures purveyed by democracy and such artistic or cultural practices as mimetic poetry. His aim, this article shows, is to contest a prominent conceptual connection between poikilia and beauty (kallos, to kalon). Exploiting tensions in the archaic and classical Greek concept, Plato associates poikilia with dangerous pleasures to (...)
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  13. Plato and His Predecessors: The Dramatisation of Reason.Jyl Gentzler - 2003 - Mind 112 (445):156-162.
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  14. Plato and Heidegger on Sophistry and Philosophy.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2016 - In Diego De Brasi & Marko Fuchs (eds.), Sophistes : Plato’s Dialogue and Heidegger’s Lectures in Marburg (1924-25). pp. 27-60.
    The present chapter investigates Heidegger's early understanding of Platonic dialectic in its contrast to sophistry as this comes to expression in his lectures on Plato's Sophist.
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  15.  29
    Plato and the Tripartition of Soul.Rachel Singpurwalla - 2019 - In Philosophy of Mind in Antiquity: History of Philosophy of Mind, Volume 1. pp. 101-119.
    In the Republic, Phaedrus, and Timaeus, Socrates holds that the psyche is complex, or has three distinct and semi-autonomous sources of motivation, which he calls the reasoning, spirited, and appetitive parts. While the rational part determines what is best overall and motivates us to pursue it, the spirited and appetitive parts incline us toward different objectives, such as victory, honor, and esteem, or the satisfaction of our desires for food, drink, and sex. While it is obvious that Socrates primarily characterizes (...)
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  16. Parmenides, Plato, and Μίμησις.Jeremy DeLong - forthcoming - In Heather Reid & Jeremy DeLong (eds.), The Many Faces of Mimesis: Selected Essays from the 2017 Symposium on the Hellenic Heritage of Western Greece (Heritage of Western Greece Series, Book 3). Sioux City, Iowa: Parnassos Press. pp. 61-74.
    Evidence for a Parmenidean influence on Plato’s Republic typically focuses on content from Bks. V-VI, and the development of Plato’s Theory of Forms. This essay aims to suggest that Plato’s censorship of poetic content in Bks. II-III—particularly the rules for portraying divine nature (376e-383c)—also draw heavily upon the Eleatic tradition, particularly Parmenides’s. Identifying this further Eleatic influence will be enhanced by my own reading of Parmenides. This reading advocates understanding Parmenides in a more Xenophanean-vein—i.e. by taking What-Is (...)
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  17. Gorgias' Defense: Plato and His Opponents on Rhetoric and the Good.Rachel Barney - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (1):95-121.
    This paper explores in detail Gorgias' defense of rhetoric in Plato 's Gorgias, noting its connections to earlier and later texts such as Aristophanes' Clouds, Gorgias' Helen, Isocrates' Nicocles and Antidosis, and Aristotle's Rhetoric. The defense as Plato presents it is transparently inadequate; it reveals a deep inconsistency in Gorgias' conception of rhetoric and functions as a satirical precursor to his refutation by Socrates. Yet Gorgias' defense is appropriated, in a streamlined form, by later defenders of rhetoric such (...)
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  18. Plato and the Universality of Dignity.Marek Piechowiak - 2015 - Themis Polska Nova 9 (2):5-25.
    An important argument in favour of recognising the cultural relativism and against universality of dignity and human rights, is the claim that the concept of dignity is a genuinely modern one. An analysis of a passage from the Demiurge’s speech in Timaeus reveals that Plato devoted time to reflecting on the question of what determines the qualitative difference between certain beings (gods and human being) and the world of things, and what forms the basis for the special treatment of (...)
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  19. Fighting Pleasure: Plato and the Expansive View of Courage.Nicholas Baima - 2019 - Journal of Value Inquiry 53 (2):255-273.
    In both the Laches (191d-e) and the Laws (1.633c-d, 1.634a-b, and 1. 635d), Plato has his protagonist defend the claim that courage (andreia) is not simply a matter of resisting pain and fear but about overcoming pleasure and desire as well. In this paper, I argue that Plato took the expansive view of courage seriously and that there are several reasons why we should too.
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  20. Christopher Rowe's Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Philosophical Books 50 (1):55-62.
    The review argues that Plato makes a valid distinction between inferior hypothetical and superior unhypothetical methods. Given the distinction, the book confuses the hypothetical for unhypothetical dialectic.
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  21. Protagoras Through Plato and Aristotle: A Case for the Philosophical Significance of Ancient Relativism.Ugo Zilioli - 2013 - In Jan Van Ophuijsen, Marlein Van Raalte & Peter Stork (eds.), Protagoras of Abdera: the Man, his measure. Brill.
    In this contribution, I explore the treatment that Plato devotes to Protagoras’ relativism in the first section of the Theaetetus (151 E 1–186 E 12) where, among other things, the definition that knowledge is perception is put under scrutiny. What I aim to do is to understand the subtlety of Plato’s argument about Protagorean relativism and, at the same time, to assess its philosophical significance by revealing the inextric¬ability of ontological and epistemological aspects on which it is built (...)
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  22.  19
    Plato and Aristotle on The Unhypothetical.Dominic Bailey - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 30:101-126.
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  23. Notes on Plato and Nietzsche.Mark Anderson - 2019 - In Diamythologõmen: A Philosophical Portrait of a Philosopher Philosophizing. Nashville, TN, USA: pp. 131-181.
    "Plato and Nietzsche contra Phaedo-Platonism" would be an appropriate subtitle for this chapter, in which I develop a reading of Plato's Phaedo as a work of philosophical art, and Plato as a philosopher-artist (in a Nietzschean mode). The chapter includes an argument that, contrary to the standard reading, the Phaedo does not teach the doctrine of escape from the cycle of rebirth (pp. 151-160). As significant as this conclusion is in and for itself, it implies as well (...)
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  24. Beyond the Chains of Illusion: My Encounter with Marx and Freud.Erich Fromm - 1962 - Continuum.
    First published in 1962, this is a book about Marx and Freud - the two intellectual giants of the 20th century.
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  25. Political Myths in Plato and Asimov.Nathaniel Goldberg - 2019 - Journal of Science Fiction and Philosophy 2:1-19.
    Works of science fiction tend to describe hypothetical futures, or counterfactual pasts or presents, to entertain their readers. Philosophical thought experiments tend to describe counterfactual situations to test their readers’ philosophical intuitions. Indeed, works of science fiction can sometimes be read as containing thought experiments. I compare one especially famous thought experiment from Plato’s Republic with what I read as two thought experiments from Isaac Asimov’s Foundation Trilogy. All three thought experiments concern myths used in political contexts, and comparing (...)
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  26. Plato and Nietzsche: Their Philosophical Art’, Mark Anderson. [REVIEW]Bethany Parsons - 2015 - Pli 27:166-170.
    Book review of Mark Anderson's 'Plato and Nietzsche: Their Philosophical Art' for Pli, the Warwick Journal of Philosophy.
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  27.  47
    Review of Heinaman, Ed., Plato and Aristotle’s Ethics. [REVIEW]Thornton C. Lockwood Jr - 2005 - Ancient Philosophy 25 (1):197-202.
    In his 1928-29 Sather Classical lectures, Paul Shorey noted that ‘there are few sentences and almost no pages of Aristotle that can be fully understood without reference to the specific passages of Plato of which he was thinking as he wrote. And as…few modern Aristotelians have the patience to know Plato intimately, Aristotelians as a class only half understand their author’ (Platonism Ancient and Modern, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1938, 6). In the 75 years since Shorey’s lament, (...)
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  28. Thought as Internal Speech in Plato and Aristotle.Matthew Duncombe - 2016 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 19:105-125.
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  29.  35
    What Lacan and Freud Did See ? - Irfan Ajvazi.Irfan Ajvazi - 2021
    What Lacan and Freud Did See ? - Irfan Ajvazi.
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  30.  82
    PLATO AND SPECIAL RELATIVITY.Hamze Hamzebh - manuscript
    the history of ancient Greece philosophy has a procedure that is so similar to the history of physics ...
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  31.  72
    PLATO AND SPECIAL RELATIVITY. Hamze - manuscript
    the same procedure that is in ancient Greece philosophy is reveal in the history of physics. the path from realism to idealism. in ...
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  32. The Temporality of Sexual Life in Husserl and Freud.Nicholas Smith - 2012 - Phenomenology of Eros.
    In this text I would like to show two things. Firstly, that the so-called “timelessness” of the Freudian unconscious can be elucidated through an interpretation of the concept of Nachträglichkeit, and showing thereby that there is indeed a temporality specific to the workings of the unconscious. Freud’s analysis of early psychic trauma related to sexual phenomena pointed to a serious complication for all believers in the immediate transparency of consciousness. For the “wound” itself was constituted over time, and the (...)
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  33. Sleepless in Syracuse: Plato and the Nocturnal Council.Andrew Hull - 2019 - In Heather Reid & Mark Ralkowski (eds.), Plato at Syracuse: Essays on Plato in Western Greece with a new translation of the Seventh Letter by Jonah Radding. Parnassos Press- Fonte Aretusa. pp. 121-129.
    I defend the Seventh Letter, traditionally attributed to Plato, against Michael Frede's argument that it presents a political philosophy inconsistent with that found in the Laws. Frede argues that Plato had given up the idea of the philosopher-king in his Laws, but the 7th Letter seems to be still committed to the project. I argue the Laws, particularly with the introduction of the Nocturnal Council, has Philosopher-Rulers in all but name. I consider the education of the Nocturnal Council (...)
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  34. Comments on Sarah Broadie “Virtue and Beyond in Plato and Aristotle”.Rachel Barney - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (Supplement):115-125.
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  35.  32
    Review of Keyt, Nature and Justice: Studies in the Ethical and Political Philosophy of Plato and Aristotle. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2017 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 11:02.
    For the last four decades, David Keyt has devoted substantial scholarly energy to the reconstruction of political and ethical arguments in Aristotle’s <i>Nicomachean Ethics</i> and <i>Politics</i>, and to a lesser degree the same in Plato’s <i>Republic</i>. Although Keyt’s translation of and commentary on <i>Politics</i> Books V and VI in the Aristotle Clarendon series (1999), to my mind, is his most substantial contribution to ancient philosophy scholarship, close competitors are his scholarly articles which seek to reconstruct the philosophical positions of (...)
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  36.  22
    What Keeps the Earth in Its Place? The Concept of Stability in Plato and Aristotle.Giora Hon & Bernard R. Goldstein - 2008 - Centaurus 50 (4):305-323.
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  37. Conscience and Conflict: Darwin, Freud, and the Origins of Human Aggression.Jim Hopkins - 2004 - In Dylan Evans & Pierre Cruse (eds.), Emotion, Evolution, and Rationality. Oxford University Press.
    Darwin's and Freud's theories cohere in explaining human group conflict.
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  38.  19
    Review of Annas, Virtue and Law in Plato and Beyond. [REVIEW]Thornton C. Lockwood - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (4):749-750.
    About Plato's Laws, Aristotle rather uninspiringly wrote, "Most of the Laws consists, in fact, of laws, and [Plato] has said little about the constitution. He wishes to make it more generally attainable [κοινοτέραν] by actual city-states, yet he gradually turns it back towards the Republic". Julia Annas's new volume seeks to counter such dismissive interpretations of Plato's Laws. Rather than view the work as Plato's final written dialogue, written by a crabby, old, pessimistic author, she argues (...)
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  39. Is There a Problem of Writing in Historiography? Plato and the Pharmakon of the Written Word.Natan Elgabsi - 2019 - Metodo. International Studies in Phenomenology and Philosophy 7 (2):225-264.
    This investigation concerns first what Jacques Derrida and Paul Ricœur consider to be «the question of writing» in Plato’s Phaedrus, and then whether their conception of a general philosophical problem of writing finds support in the dialogue. By contrast to their attempts to «determine» the «status» of writing as the general condition of knowledge, my investigation has two objections. (1) To show that Plato’s concern is not to define writing, but to reflect on what is involved in honest (...)
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  40. Walter Pater as Oxford Hegelian: Plato and Platonism_ and T. H. Green’s _Prolegomena to Ethics.Kit Andrews - 2011 - Journal of the History of Ideas 72 (3):437-459.
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  41.  80
    Pleasure and the Good Life: Plato, Aristotle, and the Neoplatonists.Gerd van Riel - 2000 - Brill.
    This volume deals with the general theory of pleasure of Plato and his successors.The first part describes the two paradigms between which all theories of ...
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  42.  52
    Plato on Poetic and Musical Representation.Justin Vlasits - 2021 - In Platonic Mimesis Revisited. Baden-Baden, Germany: pp. 147-165.
    Plato’s most infamous discussions of poetry in the Republic, in which he both develops original distinctions in narratology and advocates some form of censorship, raises numerous philosophical and philological questions. Foremost among them, perhaps, is the puzzle of why he returns to poetry in Book X after having dealt with it thoroughly in Books II–III, particularly because his accounts of the “mimetic” aspect of poetry are, on their face, quite different. How are we to understand this double treatment? Here (...)
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  43. Freud Ve Ahlak Düşüncesi Freud And Moral Reflection.Richard Rorty - 2010 - Ethos: Dialogues in Philosophy and Social Sciences 3 (2).
    Freud, kendini Kopernik ve Darwin’in de dahil olduğu merkezsizleştirici düşünce hareketi içinde görmekteydi. Ünlü bir pasajında, psikanalizin, “egoya kendi evinin bile efendisi olmadığını, ancak aklında, bilinçten uzak bir biçimde olup bitenlerin kıt bilgisi ile yetinmesi gerektiğini kanıtlamaya çabaladığını” söyler. Kendimizin önemli olduğu hissi veya özdenetim duygumuz, gerçekten kendimize karşı şeffaf olduğumuz inancına mı dayanmaktadır? Bilinç dışının keşfi neden arzularımızın keşfine değersizlik eklemek zorundadır?Freud thought of himself as part of the same “decentering” movement of thought to which Copernicus and (...)
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  44.  31
    'Law and Justice Among the Socratics: Contexts for Plato's Republic'.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2021 - Polis 38 (3):399-419.
    At the beginning of Republic 2 (358e–359b), Plato has Glaucon ascribe a social contract theory to Thrasymachus and ‘countless others’. This paper takes Glaucon’s description to refer both within the text to Thrasymachus’ views, and outside the text to a series of works, most of which have been lost, On Justice or On Law. It examines what is likely to be the earliest surviving work that presents a philosophical defence of law and justice against those who would prefer their (...)
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  45.  24
    Plato on the Role of Anger in Our Intellectual and Moral Development.Marta Jimenez - 2020 - In Laura Candiotto & Olivier Renaut (eds.), Emotions in Plato. Brill. pp. 285–307.
    In this paper I examine some of the positive epistemic and moral dimensions of anger in Plato’s dialogues. My aim is to show that while Plato is clearly aware that retaliatory anger has negative effects on people’s behavior, the strategy we find in his dialogues is not to eliminate anger altogether; instead, Plato aims to transform or rechannel destructive retaliatory anger into a different, more productive, reformative anger. I argue that this new form of anger plays a (...)
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  46. Freud or Nietzsche: The Drives, Pleasure, and Social Happiness.Donovan Miyasaki - 2004 - Dissertation, University of Toronto
    Many commentators have remarked upon the striking points of correspondence that can be found in the works of Freud and Nietzsche. However, this essay argues that on the subject of desire their work presents us with a radical choice: Freud or Nietzsche. I first argue that Freud’s theory of desire is grounded in the principle of inertia, a principle that is incompatible with his later theory of Eros and the life drive. Furthermore, the principle of inertia is (...)
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  47. Contemplation and Self-Mastery in Plato's Phaedrus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 42:77-107.
    This chapter examines Plato's moral psychology in the Phaedrus. It argues against interpreters such as Burnyeat and Nussbaum that Plato's treatment of the soul is increasingly pessimistic: reason's desire to contemplate is at odds with its obligation to rule the soul, and psychic harmony can only be secured by violently suppressing the lower parts of the soul.
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  48.  83
    Unity and Synthesis in the Ego Ideal: Reading Freud’s Concept Through Kant’s Philosophy.Francey Russell - 2012 - American Imago 3 (69):353-383.
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  49. Akrasia and Self-Rule in Plato's Laws.Joshua Wilburn - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 43:25-53.
    In this paper I challenge the commonly held view that Plato acknowledges and accepts the possibility of akrasia in the Laws. I offer a new interpretation of the image of the divine puppet in Book 1 - the passage often read as an account of akratic action -- and I show that it is not intended as an illustration of akrasia at all. Rather, it provides the moral psychological background for the text by illustrating a broader notion of self-rule (...)
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  50. Plato, Protagoras, and Predictions.Evan Keeling - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (4):633-654.
    Plato's Theaetetus discusses and ultimately rejects Protagoras's famous claim that "man is the measure of all things." The most famous of Plato's arguments is the Self-Refutation Argument. But he offers a number of other arguments as well, including one that I call the 'Future Argument.' This argument, which appears at Theaetetus 178a−179b, is quite different from the earlier Self-Refutation Argument. I argue that it is directed mainly at a part of the Protagorean view not addressed before , namely, (...)
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