Results for 'Zen'

40 found
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  1.  94
    Betting Against the Zen Monk: on Preferences and Partial Belief.Edward Elliott - 2019 - Synthese 198 (4):3733-3758.
    According to the preference-centric approach to understanding partial belief, the connection between partial beliefs and preferences is key to understanding what partial beliefs are and how (...)theyre measured. As Ramsey put it, thedegree of a belief is a causal property of it, which we can express vaguely as the extent to which we are prepared to act on itThe Foundations of Mathematics and Other Logical Essays, Routledge, Oxon, pp 156198, 1931). But this idea is not as popular as it once was. Nowadays, the preference-centric approach is frequently dismissed out-of-hand as behaviouristic, unpalatably anti-realist, and/or prone to devastating counterexamples. Cases like Eriksson and Hájeks :183213, 2007) preferenceless Zen monk and Christensens :356376, 2001) other roles argument have suggested to many that any account of partial belief that ties them too closely to preferences is irretrievably flawed. In this paper I provide a defence of preference-centric accounts of partial belief. (shrink)
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  2. The Technology of Awakening: Experiments in Zen Phenomenology.Brentyn Ramm - 2021 - Religions 12 (3):192.
    In this paper, I investigate the phenomenology of awakening in Chinese Zen Buddhism. In this tradition, to awaken is tosee your true nature’. In particular, the (...)
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  3. Zen Buddhism, Satori, Enlightenment & Truth.Peter Eastman - 2015
    Satori Zen is of immense interest to anyone pursuing authentic metaphysical knowledge because it claims to offer an astonishingly straightforward path to full Spiritual Enlightenment. And in (...)
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  4.  17
    Modern Zen and Psychoanalysis: The Semantic Connection.Rossa Ó Muireartaigh - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:189-202.
    This paper attempts to locate modern Zen and psychoanalysis in terms of contemporary philosophy of mind, particularly in view of dominant theories of cognitivism that see the (...)
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  5.  17
    Zen Buddhism and the Phenomenology of Mysticism.Dylan Bailey - 2021 - Journal for Continental Philosophy of Religion 3 (2):123-143.
    In this paper, I use a comparative analysis of mysticism in Zen and the Abrahamic faiths to formulate a phenomenological account of mysticismas such.” I argue (...)
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  6. Zen and Japanese Culture.Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki & Richard M. Jaffe - 1959 - Princeton University Press.
    Zen and Japanese Culture is one of the twentieth century's leading works on Zen, and a valuable source for those wishing to understand its concepts in (...)the context of Japanese life and art. In simple, often poetic, language, Daisetz Suzuki describes his conception of Zen and its historical evolution. He connects Zen to the philosophy of the samurai, and subtly portrays the relationship between Zen and swordsmanship, haiku, tea ceremonies, and the Japanese love of nature. Suzuki's contemplative work is enhanced by anecdotes, poetry, and illustrations showing silk screens, calligraphy, and examples of architecture. Since its original publication in 1938, this important work has played a major role in shaping conceptions of Zen's influence on Japanese traditional arts. Richard Jaffe's introduction acquaints a new generation of readers with Suzuki's life and career in both Japan and America. Jaffe discusses how Zen and Japanese Culture was received upon its first publication and analyzes the book in light of contemporary criticism, especially by scholars of Japanese Buddhism. (shrink)
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  7. (Zen And The Art Of) Post-Modern Philosophy: A Partially Interpreted Model.N. Nyberg - manuscript
    Wittgenstein once wrote, “a wheel that can be turned though nothing else moves with it, is not part of the mechanism,” and Nybergs explanation as to (...)why Hilary Putnams answer to the question of whether we might intelligibly suppose ourselves to bebrains in a vatis wrong takes us, by way of Wittgensteins statement, to the intersection of metaphysics and epistemology, i.e., to the very cornerstone of western philosophy, where we find, waiting for us, the absolute I of solipsism. Yet, it is the solipsistic I which in its articulation most obviously violates the private language arguments stricture against criterionless reference, though the solipsist has available a reply of sortsthe reply of silence, a complete silence which shrouds equally the blank slates of absolute solipsism and pure realism. Through silence, the I of solipsism becomes the eye of realism and, no longer visible even to itself, vanishes from the realm of analytic discourse, only to be reborn at the correspondent point of each successive incarnation of the paradigm. Other methods of philosophy must, thus, be adopted if we are ever to escape the analytic paradigms cyclic limits. It is here, at the point where analysis alone can carry us no further, thatZentransitions from an unusually-structured but still traditional philosophic essay into something else entirely, with the incorporation into its closing pages of 15 poetic pieces, each drawn from Nybergs 100, a longer text of philosophical poetry which takes up whereZenleaves off. nybergn7@gmail.com Iowa City, Iowa/Palo Alto, California/New York, New York/Los Angeles, California/Rapid City, South Dakota June 1982-January 2020 . (shrink)
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  8.  24
    Sacred Appellations: Secular Zen, New Materialism, and D. T. Suzukis Soku-Hi Logic.Rossa Ó Muireartaigh - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:69-83.
    The logic of soku-hi is presented as an articulation of a post-Kantian view of reality that embraces the truths of science with the assumption of the (...) transcendental subject. As such, soku-hi represents the philosophical posture of both the secular Zen of the Kyoto School and the new materialists of contemporary continental philosophy. It describes how material reality is not all even though there is nothing else. (shrink)
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  9. Absolute Present, Zen and Schrödingers One Mind.Brentyn Ramm & Peter Bruza - 2019 - In J. De Barros & Carlos Montemayor (eds.), Quanta and Mind: Essays on the Connection between Quantum Mechanics and Consciousness. Cham: Springer Verlag. pp. 189-200.
    Erwin Schrödinger holds a prominent place in the history of science primarily due to his crucial role in the development of quantum physics. What is perhaps lesser (...)
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  10.  32
    Reflections of a Zen Buddhist Nun by Kim Iryŏp[REVIEW]Eric S. Nelson - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1049-1051.
    Kim Iryŏp was raised and initially educated in a devout Methodist Christian environment under the strict guidance of her fideistic pastor father and her mother, who believed (...)
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  11. Nansen's Cat: An Examination of Zen 'Oneness'.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    If a Zen Master kills a kitten, and does not hear its scream, does it make a sound? In this essay, I use the Zen story of (...)
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  12.  48
    Maciej BARWACZ, Estetyka Życiawspólne obszary nietzscheańskiej filozofii oraz przekazów buddyzmu zen[REVIEW]Rec Konrad Pyznar - 2013 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 3 (2):533-538.
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  13. James Austin's Selfless Insight: Zen and the Meditative Transformations of Consciousness[REVIEW]Joel Krueger - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (9-10):240-244.
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  14.  79
    Liberating Language in Linji and Wittgenstein.James D. Sellmann & Hans Julius Schneider - 2003 - Asian Philosophy 13 (2-3):103-113.
    Our aim in this paper is to explicate some unexpected and striking similarities and equally important differences, which have not been discussed in the literature, between Wittgenstein' (...)s methodology and the approach of Chinese Chan or Japanese Zen Buddhism. We say ?unexpected? similarities because it is not a common practice, especially in the analytic tradition, to invest very much in comparative philosophy. The peculiarity of this study will be further accentuated in the view of those of the ?old school? who see Wittgenstein as a logical positivist, and Zen as a religious excuse for militarism or sadomasochism. If the second claim were true, the following investigation would not only be futile but also impossible. That the first claim, concerning the ?old school? perspective on Wittgenstein, is incorrect, we will demonstrate in the ensuing discussion. By now more experts have come to accept this claim and we hope that our comparative perspective will add even more momentum. (shrink)
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  15.  98
    Review of Living Karma: The Religious Practices of Ouyi Zhixu[REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2019 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 124 (May):478, 486.
    Review of the Chinese Zen Master Ouyi Zhixu.
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  16. If You See a Cyborg in the Road, Kill the Buddha: Against Transcendental Transhumanism.Woody Evans - 2014 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 24 (2):92-97.
    A stream in transhumanism argues that the aims of Buddhism and transhumanists are akin. It is the case that transhumanism contains religious tropes, and its parallels to (...)
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  17.  20
    26 More Observations.Paul Merriam - manuscript
    Observations on why is there something rather than nothing, fine tuning, beauty, time, intelligent design, qualia, Zen, Bach, Jesus, poetry, consciousness.
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  18. PARTS OF THE BHAGAVAD GITA COMPRESSED INTO A FEW THOUSAND WORDS FAMILIAR TO 21ST CENTURY SCIENTISTS.Rodney Bartlett - 2015 - Http://Vixra.Org/Author/Rodney_bartlett.
    This is an essay I entered in a competition about the Bhagavad Gita. Probably written about 2,000 years ago; this writing is perhaps the greatest philosophical (...)expression of Hinduism. I was attracted to the contest because the website included a very favourable comment about the Bhagavad Gita by Albert Einstein (see below). For a while, I actually considered it possible that Id win the contest. But that time has passed. The winner has been announced and I can now see my entry for what it isa naïve attempt to preach science to the religionists, as well as a naïve attempt to preach religion to the scientists. -/- Theres a statement in the essay which Im wondering about. I said, “However, the concept of possessing a soul is not automatically supported. The idea of having a reincarnating soul would be an easy way of explaining immortality thousands of years ago when people were completely unfamiliar with the scientific facts of an eternal universe, Einsteins Unified Field, and fractal geometry.” I still think this might be correct. Butmightis the word. Im wondering about something I later wrotecould the ghostly immaterial body described below be what we call the soul? If such a body is developed in the future to overcome present limitations, could it be referred to as a soul if it travels into the past and is absorbed into a physical body? (It might be what the Bhagavad Gita refers to as the Supersoul, and might be quantum entangled with all space and all time. And if the physical brain is receptive to this so-called entangled souls knowledge of everything in space and time, the presently accepted limits to acquiring knowledge would, to use the below quote of Einsteins, besuperfluous”). The preceding agrees with Zen Buddhism's idea of intuitively getting in touch with your inner self. -/- FromPhysics and Philosophy Beyond the Standard Model” (http://vixra.org/abs/1411.0585) – “In 1925, the Austrian physicist Wolfgang Pauli discovered the exclusion principle. This says two similar particles cannot have both the same position and velocity. If two electrons could have identical positions and velocities, they could all collapse into a roughly uniform, densesoup”. Protons and neutrons would do the same, and there would be no well-defined atoms. So we need the exclusion principle. Force-carrying particles like photons and gravitons do not obey the exclusion principle so we might assume the immaterial body wouldnt be well-defined and would collapse into a ghostly soup. But perhaps a well-defined structure can be built if the photons are first stopped. The potential for photons to possess mass by having their digital sequence altered and being converted to other particlesor the potential for programming the photons - may make this definition possible. A chrononaut whose body is defined by mass would still have a gravitational effect, and be dark matter. But if she or he would rather not be a lump of dark matter, her or his body might be defined by programming photons and gravitons; creating a body oflight matter”. The beginnings of this technology may be in [43] which speaks of one photon beingstuckto another.” . (shrink)
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  19. Hays Buddhist Philosophy of Gestural Language.Joshua M. Hall - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (3):175-188.
    The central role of gestural language in Buddhism is widely acknowledged, as in the story of the Buddha pointing at the moon, the point being the student (...)s seeing beyond the finger to its gesture. Gestures role in dance is similarly central, as noted by scholars in the emerging interdisciplinary field of dance studies. Unsurprisingly, then, the intersection of these two fields is well-populated, including the formal gestures Buddhism inherited from classical Indian dance, and the masked dance of the Mani Rimdu Festival. In this investigation, I will articulate a new Buddhist philosophy of gestural language, based on a new conception of emptiness that I locate in the work of contemporary U.S. choreographer Deborah Hay, as influenced by Nāgārjuna and Zen. And this, finally, suggests that contemporary Western philosophy should incorporate this compassion as a normative dimension to its own theorizing and practice. (shrink)
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  20. Nerve/Nurses of the Cosmic Doctor: Wang Yang-Ming on Self-Awareness as World-Awareness.Joshua M. Hall - 2016 - Asian Philosophy 26 (2):149-165.
    In Philip J. Ivanhoes introduction to his Readings from the Lu-Wang School of Neo-Confucianism, he argues convincingly that the Ming-era Neo-Confucian philosopher Wang Yang (...)-ming (14721529) was much more influenced by Buddhism (especially Zens Platform Sutra) than has generally been recognized. In light of this influence, and the centrality of questions of selfhood in Buddhism, in this article I will explore the theme of selfhood in Wangs Neo-Confucianism. Put as a mantra, for Wangself-awareness is world-awareness.” My central image for this mantra is the entire cosmos anthropomorphized as a doctor engaged in constant self-diagnosis, in which effort s/he is assisted by an entire staff of the nerves/nursesindividual humans enlightened as Wangian sages. In short, I will argue that the world for Wang could be meaningfully understood as a mindful, self-healing body within which humans are the sensitive nerves, using our mindful awareness to direct attention to the affected areas when injury or disease occurs. We are, and must thus recognize that we are, the bold but sensitive nervous system of the cosmos, sharing (like neurons) our loving excitement, carrying out (like a medical nurse) the doctors orders for the self-care of our cosmic body/medical corps. (shrink)
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  21. Dōgens Sprachdenken. Historische Und Symboltheoretische Perspektiven [Dōgens Language Thinking. Historic and Symbol Theoretic Perspectives].Ralf Müller - 2013 - Freiburg im Breisgau, Deutschland: Verlag Karl Alber.
    Wie denkt Dogen (1200-1253) Sprache im Horizont der sprachkritischen Tradition des Zenbuddhismus? Die vorliegende Studie widmet sich dieser Frage und rekonstruiert umfassend das Sprachdenken des philosophisch (...)fruchtbarsten Autors der japanischen Vormoderne. Dazu wählt der Autor einen doppelten Zugang: zum einen rezeptionsgeschichtlich unter Einschluss von Philosophen des modernen Japans, zum anderen systematisch mithilfe der Symboltheorie Ernst Cassirers in der Theoretisierung eines adäquaten Sprachbegriffs. So verschränken sich mit Interpretationen zum Hauptwerk Dogens, dem Shobogenzo, Außen- und Innenperspektive auf ein zenbuddhistisches Sprachdenken und erweisen es in seiner Kommensurabilität zum philosophischen Diskurs. (shrink)
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  22. Empathy and the Extended Mind.Joel W. Krueger - 2009 - Zygon 44 (3):675-698.
    I draw upon the conceptual resources of the extended mind thesis to analyze empathy and interpersonal understanding. Against the dominant mentalistic paradigm, I argue that empathy is (...)
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  23. Beautiful Bodhisattvas: The Aesthetics of Spiritual Exemplarity.Ian James Kidd - 2017 - Contemporary Buddhism 18 (2):331-345.
    The worlds spiritual traditions incorporate a variety of types of exemplar, persons who exemplify a life of aspiration to, or attainment of, spiritual goods. Within Buddhism, (...)the range of exemplars includes monastics, boddhisattvas, the Zen masters, and the Buddha himself. Spiritual exemplars are typically described as having a distinctive form of bodily beauty, closely related to their ethical and spiritual qualities, that manifests as a form of radiance, luminosity, or charisma. Drawing on recent work on beauty, virtue, and the body in the Buddhist tradition, I propose an aesthetics of spiritual exemplarity, arguing that certain spiritual traditionsincluding Buddhismare kaligenic, able to generate new forms or experiences of embodied moral beauty. (shrink)
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  24. Interdependence and Nonduality: On the Linguistic Strategy of the Platform Sūtra.Chien-Hsing Ho - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1231-1250.
    Although Chan, or Zen, Buddhism traditionally claimed itself as a special transmission outside doctrinal teachings that eschews the written word, it has long been praised for its (...)
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  25. Paradoxical Language in Chan Buddhism.Chien-Hsing Ho - 2020 - In Yiu-Ming Fung (ed.), Dao Companion to Chinese Philosophy of Logic. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 389-404.
    Chinese Chan or Zen Buddhism is renowned for its improvisational, atypical, and perplexing use of words. In particular, the traditions encounter dialogues, which took place between (...)Chan masters and their interlocutors, abound in puzzling, astonishing, and paradoxical ways of speaking. In this chapter, we are concerned with Chans use of paradoxical language. In philosophical parlance, a linguistic paradox comprises the confluence of opposite or incongruent concepts in a way that runs counter to our common sense and ordinary rational thinking. One naturally wonders about Chan mastersrationales for their use of paradox. There are also concerns about whether the use violates the logical principle of noncontradiction to the effect that nothing can be both P and not-P all over in the same way at the same time. Chan became a viable Chinese Buddhist tradition during the Tang dynasty (618907) and continued to develop for several centuries. The tradition had produced a huge literature; consequently, our investigation of its use of paradox cannot but be limited and selective. In the second section, I first sketch key ideas of Chan that are pertinent to our investigation and then examine the use of paradox in the sermons associated with certain Tang masters of the southern Chan. In the third section, I analyze the presence of paradoxical language in post-Tang encounter dialogues. The fourth section concludes. (shrink)
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  26. Emptiness and Experience: Pure and Impure.John W. M. Krummel - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (1):57-76.
    This paper discusses the idea of "pure experience" within the context of the Buddhist tradition and in connection with the notions of emptiness and dependent origination (...) via a reading of Dale Wright's reading of 'Huangbo' in his 'Philosophical Meditations on Zen Buddhism'. The purpose is to appropriate Wright's text in order to engender a response to Steven Katz's contextualist-constructivist thesis that there are no "pure" (i.e., unmediated) experiences. In light of the Mahayana claim that everything is empty of substance, i.e., originates dependently through conditions, contingencies, and contexts, what does the "purity" of the Enlightenment experience mean for Chan/Zen Buddhism? (shrink)
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  27. Master Questions, Student Questions, and Genuine Questions: A Performative Analysis of Questions in Chan Encounter Dialogues.Nathan Eric Dickman - 2020 - Religions 2 (11):72.
    I want to know whether Chan masters and students depicted in classical Chan transmission literature can be interpreted as asking open (or what I will callgenuine”) (...)
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  28. Buddhist Illogic: A Critical Analysis of Nagarjuna's Arguments.Avi Sion - 2002 - Geneva, Switzerland: CreateSpace & Kindle; Lulu..
    Buddhist Illogic. The 2nd Century CE Indian philosopher Nagarjuna founded the Madhyamika (Middle Way) school of Mahayana Buddhism, which strongly influenced Chinese, Korean and Japanese (Chan (...)or Zen) Buddhism, as well as Tibetan Buddhism. Nagarjuna is regarded by many Buddhist writers to this day as a very important philosopher, who they claim definitively proved the futility of ordinary human cognitive means. His writings include a series of arguments purporting to show the illogic of logic, the absurdity of reason. He considers this the way to verbalize and justify the Buddhist doctrine ofemptiness” (Shunyata). These arguments attack some of the basic tenets and techniques of reasoning, such as the laws of thought (identity, non-contradiction and the excluded middle), conceptualization and predication, our common assumptions of self, entities and essences, as well as our beliefs in motion and causation. The present essay demonstrates the many sophistries involved in Nagarjunas arguments. He uses double standards, applying or ignoring the laws of thought and other norms as convenient to his goals; he manipulates his readers, by giving seemingly logical form (like the dilemma) to his discourse, while in fact engaged in non-sequiturs or appealing to doubtful premises; he plays with words, relying on unclear terminology, misleading equivocations and unfair fixations of meaning; and hesteals concepts’, using them to deny the very percepts on which they are based. Although a critique of the Madhyamika philosophical interpretation and defense ofemptiness”, Buddhist Illogic is not intended to dissuade readers from Buddhism. On the contrary, its aim to enhance personal awareness of actual cognitive processes, and so improve meditation. It is also an excellent primer on phenomenological epistemology. (shrink)
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  29.  80
    Logical and Spiritual Reflections.Avi Sion - 2008 - Geneva, Switzerland: CreateSpace & Kindle; Lulu..
    Logical and Spiritual Reflections is a collection of six shorter philosophical works, including: Humes Problems with Induction; A Short Critique of Kants Unreason; In Defense of (...) Aristotles Laws of Thought; More Meditations; Zen Judaism; No to Sodom. Of these works, the first set of three constitutes the Logical Reflections, and the second set constitutes the Spiritual Reflections. Humes Problems with Induction, which is intended to describe and refute some of the main doubts and objections David Hume raised with regard to inductive reasoning. It replaces the so-called problem of induction with a principle of induction. David Humes notorious skepticism was based on errors of observation and reasoning, with regard to induction, causation, necessity, the self and freewill. These are here pointed out and critically analyzed in detailand more accurate and logical theories are proposed. The present work also includes refutations of Hempels and Goodmans alleged paradoxes of induction. A Short Critique of Kants Unreason, which is a brief critical analysis of some of the salient epistemological and ontological ideas and theses in Immanuel Kants famous Critique of Pure Reason. It shows that Kant was in no position to criticize reason, because he neither sufficiently understood its workings nor had the logical tools needed for the task. Kants transcendental reality, his analytic-synthetic dichotomy, his views on experience and concept formation, and on the forms of sensibility (space and time) and understanding (his twelve categories), are here all subjected to rigorous logical evaluation and found deeply flawedand more coherent theories are proposed in their stead. In Defense of Aristotles Laws of Thought, which addresses, from a phenomenological standpoint, numerous modern and Buddhist objections and misconceptions regarding the basic principles of Aristotelian logic. Many people seem to be attacking Aristotles Laws of Thought nowadays, some coming from the West and some from the East. It is important to review and refute such ideas as they arise. More Meditations, which is a sequel to the authors earlier work, Meditations. It proposes additional practical methods and theoretical insights relating to meditation and Buddhism. It also discusses certain often glossed over issues relating to Buddhismnotably, historicity, idolatry, messianism, importation to the West. Zen Judaism, which is a frank reflection on the tensions between reason and faith in todays context of knowledge, and on the need to inject Zen-like meditation into Judaism. This work also treats some issues in ethics and theodicy. No to Sodom, which is an essay against homosexuality, using biological, psychological, spiritual, ethical and political arguments. (shrink)
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  30. Review of Listening Into the Heart of Things-on MDMA and LSD by Samuel Widmer (1989).Michael Starks - 2016 - In Suicidal Utopian Delusions in the 21st Century: Philosophy, Human Nature and the Collapse of Civilization-- Articles and Reviews 2006-2017 2nd Edition Feb 2018. Henderson,NV, USA: Michael Starks. pp. 573-575.
    This is an early volume from a much respected psychedelic psychotherapist. He has written several other books since this one but until recently none of his books (...)
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  31.  54
    Шеретюк, Руслана, і Стоколос, Надія. «Pietas et Litterae» («Благочестя та Освіта»). Культурно-освітня діяльність ордену піарів на Волині (кінець XVIIперша третина ХІХ ст.) (Рівне: О. Зень, 2018), 289 с.Nazarii Loshtyn - 2019 - Kyivan Academy 16 (8):212-221.
    Book review: Sheretiuk, Ruslana, and Stokolos, Nadiia. «Pietas et Litterae» («Blahochestia ta Osvita»). Kulturno-osvitnia diialnist ordenu piariv na Volyni (kinets XVIIpersha tretyna ХІХ st.) (Rivne: (...)
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  32.  72
    Maszyny, cnoty i "dżihad butleriański".Piotr Machura - 2018 - Śląskie Studia Historyczno-Teologiczne 51 (2).
    Przedmiotem artykułu jest rozważenie znaczenia zmian, jakie dla form działania podmiotowego (duchowości) mają zmiany technologicznie. Przyjmując, że pewne punkty zaczepienia takiej refleksji dostępne w popkulturowych formach (...)
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  33.  81
    Anselms Proslogion, “nichtsgegen Nishida und Heidegger.Manfred Gawlina - 2013 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 3 (2):285-300.
    Co jest większe, bycie czy nic? Anzelm dowodzi istnienia Boga przy pomocy nihil. Bóg jako to, od czego nic większego nie może zostać pomyślane przez skończony umysł. (...)
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  34.  74
    Becoming-Religion: Re-/Thinking Religion with AN Whitehead and Keiji Nishitani.Kenneth Masong - 2013 - Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 17 (2):1-26.
    For Whitehead and Nishitani, a rethinking of religion necessitates a rethinking of the metaphysics that underlie ones concept of religion. The dynamism of religion is unveiled (...)only within the metaphysical grounding of an ontology that accommodates the philosophical preference ofbecomingas an ultimate category of reality. The novelty of Whiteheads theory of religion lies in the process metaphysics that it presupposes. For him, religion, like the whole of reality, is inherently developing and evolving. What Nishitani offers is a rethinking of Western understanding of religion by way of an Asian speculative approach grounded in Zen Buddhism. He argues that Western religion, particularly Christianity and Judaism, has succumbed to the modern predicament of nihilism, or relative nothingness. He radicalizes this same nihility towards absolute nothingness (śūnyatā). For both Whitehead and Nishitani, despite the distortion of religion by religious fundamentalists, genuine religion consolidates and points a society towards its real destiny. However, the realization of religions role necessitates reflexivity on its own inherent dynamism. (shrink)
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  35. Approaching Cognitive-Behavioral & Existential Therapy Through Neo-Confucianism.Joffre D. Meyer - 1984 - Dissertation, Texas A&M
    ABSTRACT Approaching Cognitive-Behavioral and Existential Therapy Through Neo-Confucianism (December 1984). Joffre Denis Meyer, B. A. Texas A&M University Chairman of Graduate Committee: Dr. William R. (...)
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  36.  44
    Advanced Buddhist Metaphysics: Exercises in Sceptical Spirituality.Peter Eastman - 2021 - London, UK: HarfieldAcademic.
    Including such topics as: What is Metaphysics ? Krishnamurti Explained The Perpetual Emptiness of Academic Philosophy Meister Eckhart & the Godhead Zen, Satori & Truth Enlightenment andpermanent non- (...)dual awarenessBuddhism & psychotherapy . (shrink)
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  37.  55
    Notes Towards a Meontological Critique of the Ontological Metatradition of Philosophy.I. Neminemus - 2021 - Social Sciences Research Network.
    There has been no challenge tothe tradition of philosophyin contemporaneity: philosophy has since evolved past the criticisms of the twentieth century. Indeed, contemporary philosophy is (...)
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  38. Leibliches Üben als Teil einer philosophischen Lebenskunst: Die Verkörperung von Kata in den japanischen Wegkünsten.Leon Krings - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:179-197.
    In this paper, I try to show how Japanese practices of self-cultivation found in the so-calledwayscan be interpreted as embodied forms ofcaring for (...) oneselfand, therefore, as part of a philosophical Lebenskunst or art of living. To this end, I refer to phenomenological accounts of the body as well as to a unique notion of practice found in the writings of Dōgen Kigen, a thirteenth-century Japanese Zen master. Central to this essay is a concern with embodying kata or pre-defined patterns of movement and posture used in nearly all practices of self-cultivation in Japan. To approach this question, I look at the etymological roots of the term kata and its use in the writings of Zeami, the foremost representative of classical Noh theater, both as author and as actor. This is followed by an analysis of certain aspects of the embodiment of kata and the way it is described in Japanese literature. (shrink)
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  39.  65
    Transitions: Crossing Boundaries in Japanese Philosophy.Leon Krings, Francesca Greco & Yukiko Kuwayama (eds.) - 2021 - Nagoya: Chisokudō.
    The tenth volume of the Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy focuses on the theme oftransition,” dealing with transitory and intermediary phenomena and practices such as translation, transmission, (...)
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  40. When Mountains Cease to Be Mountains: An Interreligious Meditation on the Sanctification of Desire.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    What is the relationship of human desire to divine love? Spiritual traditions teach us that human desire achieves its true aim only when elevated into the life (...)
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