Results for 'art of living'

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  1.  75
    "Nietzsche's Art of Living in the United States Today".Reinhard G. Mueller - 2023 - In Günter Gödde, Jörg Zirfas, Reinhard Mueller & Werner Stegmaier (eds.), Nietzsche on the Art of Living: New Studies from the German-Speaking Nietzsche Research. Nashville: Orientations Press. pp. 263-277.
    In the 21st century, we increasingly live in a Nietzschean world. What was once feared as ‘nihilism,’ the loss of all final certainties and absolutes, or ‘relativism,’ that everything relates to a standpoint, has become a lived reality for many people today. Especially younger generations have learned to affirm the living conditions of uncertainty and temporality by eclectically adopting ways of life, routines, and orientations in individual ways for only certain periods of time. Digital technologies, especially the smart phone, (...)
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  2. Nietzsche on the Art of Living: New Studies from the German-Speaking Nietzsche Research.Günter Gödde, Jörg Zirfas, Reinhard Mueller & Werner Stegmaier (eds.) - 2023 - Nashville: Orientations Press.
    The philosophy of the art of living asks the age-old question of orienting one’s own life: ‘How can I live well?’ An art of living is always called for when people do not know what to do and how to go on, when the ways of life are no longer self-evident, when traditions, conventions, rules, and norms lose their plausibility and individuals begin to worry about themselves. The art of living and of its philosophy has a practical (...)
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  3. Heroic Art of Living: Nietzsche’s Rank Order of the Types of Life.Manuel Knoll - 2023 - In Nietzsche on the Art of Living. New Studies from the German-Speaking Nietzsche Research. Nashville: Orientation Press. pp. 183–97.
    The central aim of the present investigation is to shed light on Nietzsche’s understanding of happiness and a good life, starting from Nietzsche’s appropriation of Plato’s and Aristotle’s doctrine of a hierarchy of human beings and forms of life.
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  4. The Art of Living with NZT and ICT: Dialectics of an Artistic Case Study.Hub Zwart - 2017 - Foundations of Science 22 (2):353-356.
    I wholeheartedly sympathize conceptually with Coeckelbergh’s paper. The dialectical relationship between vulnerability and technology constitutes the core of Hegel’s Master and Slave. Yet, the empirical dimension is underdeveloped and Coeckelbergh’s ideas could profit from exposure to case studies. Building on a movie/novel devoted to vulnerability coping and living with ICT, I challenge the claim that modern heroism entails overcoming vulnerability with the help of enhancement and computers.
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  5. What It Takes to Live Philosophically: Or, How to Progress in the Art of Living.Caleb Cohoe & Stephen R. Grimm - 2020 - Metaphilosophy 51 (2-3):391-410.
    This essay presents an account of what it takes to live a philosophical way of life: practitioners must be committed to a worldview, structure their lives around it, and engage in truth‐directed practices. Contra John Cooper, it does not require that one’s life be solely guided by reason. Religious or tradition‐based ways of life count as truth directed as long as their practices are reasons responsive and would be truth directed if the claims made by their way of life are (...)
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  6. The Upanishadic Art of Living.Varanasi Ramabrahmam - manuscript
    A human being though basically a physico-chemical and hence physiological being; is essentially a psychological being. Psychology is physiology, but “appears” separate to most humans and will be dealt with as here. But attempts will be made to intermittently connect with modern scientific understanding in terms of nervous system – the brain, spinal cord, nerves and neurons- to get a comprehensive picture of mind and its functions for academic purpose. -/- Psychology is human consciousness and mind and their functions manifested (...)
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  7.  73
    The Art of Living[REVIEW]Dean Pickard - 1999 - New Nietzsche Studies 3 (3-4):137-144.
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  8. Way - Reflections on the Art of Living.Alik Pelman - 2021 - Israel: Asia Publishers.
    Reflections on Ethical Living, Asia Publishers, (2021). Editor: Prof. Dror Burstein. (In Hebrew) Two academic events dedicated to the book hosted 7 commentators discussing its key philosophical themes: the Van Leer Institute in Jerusalem, and the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. The book has also generated over 20 interviews in the main Israeli media channels.
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  9. Philosophy for children meets the art of living: a holistic approach to an education for life.L. D'Olimpio & C. Teschers - 2016 - Philosophical Inquiry in Education 23 (2):114-124.
    This article explores the meeting of two approaches towards philosophy and education: the philosophy for children approach advocated by Lipman and others, and Schmid’s philosophical concept of Lebenskunst. Schmid explores the concept of the beautiful or good life by asking what is necessary for each individual to be able to develop their own art of living and which aspects of life are significant when shaping a good and beautiful life. One element of Schmid’s theory is the practical application of (...)
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  10. The art of conversation: design cybernetics and its ethics.Claudia Westermann - 2020 - Kybernetes 49 (8):2171-2183.
    Purpose This paper discusses ethical principles that are implicit in second-order cybernetics, with the aim of arriving at a better understanding of how second-order cybernetics frames living in a world with others. It further investigates implications for second-order cybernetics approaches to architectural design, i.e. the activity of designing frameworks for living. -/- Design/methodology/approach The paper investigates the terminology in the second-order cybernetics literature with specific attention to terms that suggest that there are ethical principles at work. It further (...)
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  11. State of the Art of Audio- and Video-Based Solutions for AAL.Slavisa Aleksic, Michael Atanasov, Jean Calleja Agius, Kenneth Camilleri, Anto Cartolovni, Pau Climent-Perez, Sara Colantonio, Stefania Cristina, Vladimir Despotovic, Hazim Kemal Ekenel, Ekrem Erakin, Francisco Florez-Revuelta, Danila Germanese, Nicole Grech, Steinunn Gróa Sigurđardóttir, Murat Emirzeoglu, Ivo Iliev, Mladjan Jovanovic, Martin Kampel, William Kearns, Andrzej Klimczuk, Lambros Lambrinos, Jennifer Lumetzberger, Wiktor Mucha, Sophie Noiret, Zada Pajalic, Rodrigo Rodriguez Perez, Galidiya Petrova, Sintija Petrovica, Peter Pocta, Angelica Poli, Mara Pudane, Susanna Spinsante, Albert Ali Salah, Maria Jose Santofimia, Anna Sigríđur Islind, Lacramioara Stoicu-Tivadar, Hilda Tellioglu & Andrej Zgank - 2022 - Alicante: University of Alicante.
    It is a matter of fact that Europe is facing more and more crucial challenges regarding health and social care due to the demographic change and the current economic context. The recent COVID-19 pandemic has stressed this situation even further, thus highlighting the need for taking action. Active and Assisted Living technologies come as a viable approach to help facing these challenges, thanks to the high potential they have in enabling remote care and support. Broadly speaking, AAL can be (...)
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  12. Ecologies of Death, Ecologies of Mourning: A Biophilosophy of Non/Living Arts.Marietta Radomska - 2023 - Research in Arts and Education 2023 (2):7-20.
    In the present condition of planetary environmental crises, violence, and war, entire ecosystems are annihilated, habitats turn into unliveable spaces, and shared “more-than-human” vulnerabilities get amplified. Here and now, death and loss become urgent environmental concerns, while the Anthropocene-induced anxiety, anger, and grief are manifested in popular-scientific narratives, art, culture, and activism. Grounded in the theoretical framework of queer death studies, this article explores present grief imaginaries and engagements with more-than-human death, dying, and extinction, as they are interwoven through contemporary (...)
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  13. Scrutinizing the art of theater.Aaron Meskin - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (3):pp. 51-66.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Scrutinizing the Art of TheaterAaron Meskin (bio)IntroductionIn his 1992 address to the American Society for Aesthetics, Peter Kivy suggested that philosophers of art might do best by giving up on “grand theorizing” (that is, pursuing the definition of art).1 In its place he proposed that they pursue the “careful and imaginative philosophical scrutiny of the individual arts and their individual problems.”2 Of course John Passmore and others had said (...)
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  14. The Art of Telling the Truth: Language, Power and the Play of the Outside in Michel Foucault.Abhilash G. Nath - 2015 - Dissertation, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
    In Foucault, thought is spatial, and unfolds within the density of becoming, in the void that separates the subject and the object. It is ontologically independent from the authority of the contemplating self, the ‘I’. Thought is a being of its own, and comes from the outside – the world of relationships. The present study poses to itself the following question: if thinking indeed comes from the outside, then under what condition thinking can encounter itself – its colour, texture and (...)
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  15. The Living Image in Bio-Art and in Philosophy.Vid Simoniti - 2019 - Oxford Art Journal 42 (2):177-196.
    What role do images play in philosophical persuasion? With the advent of bio-art in the 1990s, a new vista opened up for this age-old puzzle: the possibility of creating images through bioengineering of living matter. Here, I test the critical intentions of bio-artists by setting up a comparison between, on the one hand, bio-art, and on the other, bioethics, a philosophical discipline, which developed at around the same time as this new artform. I argue there is an aspect of (...)
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  16. Deterritorialising Death: Queerfeminist Biophilosophy and Ecologies of the Non/Living in Contemporary Art.Marietta Radomska - 2020 - Australian Feminist Studies 35 (104).
    In the contemporary context of environmental crises and the degradation of resources, certain habitats become unliveable, leading to the death of individuals and species extinction. Whilst bioscience emphasises interdependency and relationality as crucial characteristics of life shared by all organisms, Western cultural imaginaries tend to draw a thick dividing line between humans and nonhumans, particularly evident in the context of death. On the one hand, death appears as a process common to all forms of life; on the other, as an (...)
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  17. State of the Art - Elements for Critical Thinking and Doing.Erich Berger, Mari Keski-Korsu, Marietta Radomska & Line Thastum (eds.) - 2023 - Helsinki: Bioart Society.
    How to participate proactively in a process of change and transformation, to shape our path within an uncertain future? With this publication, the State Of The Art Network marks a waypost on a journey which started in 2018, when like-minded Nordic and Baltic art organisations and professionals initiated this network as a multidisciplinary collaboration facing the Anthropocene. Over five years, ten organisations and around 80 practitioners from different disciplines, like the arts, natural sciences and humanities came together, online and in (...)
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  18. Review of Richard Shusterman, Performing Live: Aesthetic Alternatives for Ends of Art. [REVIEW]William Day - 2004 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62:300-302.
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  19. Non/living Matter, Bioscientific Imaginaries and Feminist Techno-ecologies of Bioart.Marietta Radomska - 2017 - Australian Feminist Studies 32 (94):377-394.
    Bioart is a form of hybrid artistico-scientific practices in contemporary art that involve the use of bio-materials (such as living cells, tissues, organisms) and scientific techniques, protocols, and tools. Bioart-works embody vulnerability (intrinsic to all beings) and depend on (bio)technologies that allow these creations to come into being, endure and flourish but also discipline them. This article focuses on ‘semi-living’ sculptures by The Tissue Culture and Art Project (TC&A). TC&A’s artworks consist of bioengineered mammal tissues grown over biopolymer (...)
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  20. Painful Art and the Limits of Well-Being.Aaron Smuts - 2013 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotions in Art. Palgrave/ Macmillan.
    In this chapter I explore what painful art can tell us about the nature and importance of human welfare. My goal is not so much to defend a new solution to the paradox of tragedy, as it is to explore the implications of the kinds of solutions that I find attractive. Both nonhedonic compensatory theories and constitutive theories explain why people seek out painful art, but they have troublesome implications. On some narrow theories of well-being, they imply that painful art (...)
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  21. State of the Art on Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues Linked to Audio- and Video-Based AAL Solutions.Alin Ake-Kob, Aurelija Blazeviciene, Liane Colonna, Anto Cartolovni, Carina Dantas, Anton Fedosov, Francisco Florez-Revuelta, Eduard Fosch-Villaronga, Zhicheng He, Andrzej Klimczuk, Maksymilian Kuźmicz, Adrienn Lukacs, Christoph Lutz, Renata Mekovec, Cristina Miguel, Emilio Mordini, Zada Pajalic, Barbara Krystyna Pierscionek, Maria Jose Santofimia Romero, Albert AliSalah, Andrzej Sobecki, Agusti Solanas & Aurelia Tamo-Larrieux - 2021 - Alicante: University of Alicante.
    Ambient assisted living technologies are increasingly presented and sold as essential smart additions to daily life and home environments that will radically transform the healthcare and wellness markets of the future. An ethical approach and a thorough understanding of all ethics in surveillance/monitoring architectures are therefore pressing. AAL poses many ethical challenges raising questions that will affect immediate acceptance and long-term usage. Furthermore, ethical issues emerge from social inequalities and their potential exacerbation by AAL, accentuating the existing access gap (...)
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  22. Mirrors of the soul and mirrors of the brain? The expression of emotions as the subject of art and science.Machiel Keestra - 2014 - In Gary Schwartz (ed.), Emotions. Pain and pleasure in Dutch painting of the Golden Age. nai010 publishers. pp. 81-92.
    Is it not surprising that we look with so much pleasure and emotion at works of art that were made thousands of years ago? Works depicting people we do not know, people whose backgrounds are usually a mystery to us, who lived in a very different society and time and who, moreover, have been ‘frozen’ by the artist in a very deliberate pose. It was the Classical Greek philosopher Aristotle who observed in his Poetics that people could apparently be moved (...)
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  23. Images of Reality: Iris Murdoch's Five Ways From Art to Religion.Elizabeth Burns [Philosophy Staff] - 2015 - Religions 6 (3):875-890.
    Art plays a significant role in Iris Murdoch’s moral philosophy, a major part of which may be interpreted as a proposal for the revision of religious belief. In this paper, I identify within Murdoch’s philosophical writings five distinct but related ways in which great art can assist moral/religious belief and practice: art can reveal to us “the world as we were never able so clearly to see it before”; this revelatory capacity provides us with evidence for the existence of the (...)
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  24. Hegel's End of Art Revisited: The Death of God and the Essential Finitude of Artistic Beauty.Jeffrey Reid - 2020 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 1 (48):77-101.
    The article re-visits the different scholarly approaches to Hegel's end-of-art scenario, and then proposes a new reading whereby ending and finitude are presented as essential features of beautiful art. The first and most determinant of art's endings is the death of the Christly art object, not representations of Christ, but the actual death of (the son of) God himself as the last classical artwork. The death of God represents the last word in Greco-Roman art, the accomplishment of the beautiful individuality (...)
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  25. “Saving Lives or Saving Stones?” The Ethics of Cultural Heritage Protection in War.Erich Hatala Matthes - 2018 - Public Affairs Quarterly 32 (1):67-84.
    In discussion surrounding the destruction of cultural heritage in armed conflict, one often hears two important claims in support of intervention to safeguard heritage. The first is that the protection of people and the protection of heritage are two sides of the same coin. The second is that the cultural heritage of any people is part of the common heritage of all humankind. In this article, I examine both of these claims, and consider the extent to which they align with (...)
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  26. PREDICTOR OF ANEMIA AMONG PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV TAKING TENOFOVIR+LAMIVUDINE+EFAVIRENZ THERAPY IN JAYAPURA, PAPUA.Setyo Adiningsih, Tri Nury Kridaningsih, Mirna Widiyanti & Tri Wahyuni - 2023 - Jurnal Berkala Epidemiologi 11 (1):32-39.
    Background: The most common hematological abnormality among people infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is anemia. This is also related to high mortality risk among patients receiving Antiretroviral Therapy (ART). Purpose: This study aimed to identify predictors of anemia among HIV patients taking ART using a regimen of the single-tablet drug contain tenofovir, lamivudine, and efavirenz in Jayapura, Papua. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at Jayapura regional hospital from June to September 2017. A total of 80 HIV patients (...)
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  27.  48
    Review of Francesco Guala, Understanding Institutions, The Science and Philosophy of Living Together, Princeton University Press, 2016, 222 p. in Annals of Luigi Einaudi Foundation, vol LI(3). [REVIEW]Tieffenbach Emma - 2018 - Annals of the Fondazione Luigi Einaudi:201-206.
    If one wishes to understand what money is, to whom should one turn as the most reliable source of knowledge? Of course, economists propose themselves as the experts on the matter. Who, if not those who study in- terest rates, prices and exchanges could know more about the nature of money? Yet, with a few exceptions, those philosophers in the burgeoning field of social ontology who ask ‘what is money?’ (or, for that matter, ‘what is a marriage?, ‘what is ownership?’, (...)
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  28. Interpreting AI-Generated Art: Arthur Danto’s Perspective on Intention, Authorship, and Creative Traditions in the Age of Artificial Intelligence.Raquel Cascales - 2023 - Polish Journal of Aesthetics 71 (4):17-29.
    Arthur C. Danto did not live to witness the proliferation of AI in artistic creation. However, his philosophy of art offers key ideas about art that can provide an interesting perspective on artwork generated by artificial intelligence (AI). In this article, I analyze how his ideas about contemporary art, intention, interpretation, and authorship could be applied to the ongoing debate about AI and artistic creation. At the same time, it is also interesting to consider whether the incorporation of AI into (...)
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  29. The Death of Immortality and the Mystery of Art’s Temporal Transcendence.Derek Allan - manuscript
    It has long been recognised that great art, whether visual art, literature or music, has a special capacity to “live on” – to endure – long after the moment of its creation. Thus, our world of art today includes, for example, ancient Mesopotamian sculpture, Shakespeare’s plays, and the music of medieval times. How does this capacity to endure operate? Or to ask that question another way: what does “endure” mean in the case of art? The Renaissance concluded that art endures (...)
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  30. Aesthetic Gestures: Elements of a Philosophy of Art in Frege and Wittgenstein.Nikolay Milkov - 2019 - In Shyam Wuppuluri & Newton da Costa (eds.), Wittgensteinian : Looking at the World From the Viewpoint of Wittgenstein's Philosophy. Springer Verlag. pp. 506-18.
    Gottlob Frege’s conception of works of art has received scant notice in the literature. This is a pity since, as this paper undertakes to reveal, his innovative philosophy of language motivated a theoretically and historically consequential, yet unaccountably marginalized Wittgenstinian line of inquiry in the domain of aesthetics. The element of Frege’s approach that most clearly inspired this development is the idea that only complete sentences articulate thoughts and that what sentences in works of drama and literary art express are (...)
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  31. A Relational Account of Structure and Agency via ‘Lived Ancient Religion’ and the ‘Processing Approach,’ with a Case Study of Circumcision in Ancient Judaism.Thomas R. Blanton Iv - 2022 - Religion in the Roman Empire 8 (3):270–300.
    Addressing studies of the concepts of structure and agency, in 2008 sociologist François Dépelteau called for a ‘relational approach’ that compared the ‘trans-actions’ of actors, but notably left open the question of how such a study should be conducted. The present article attempts to operationalise Dépelteau’s call, albeit in a manner tailored specifically to meet the needs of researchers in the area of ‘lived ancient religion’. The study of ‘trans-action’ is operationalised here by employing key terms drawn from Staf Hellemans’s (...)
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  32.  79
    Roleplaying Game–Based Engineering Ethics Education: Lessons from the Agency of Art.Trystan S. Goetze - forthcoming - Proceedings of the 2024 American Society for Engineering Education St. Lawrence Section Annual Conference.
    How do we prepare engineering students to make ethical and responsible decisions in their professional work? This paper presents an approach that enhances engineering students’ engagement with ethical reasoning by simulating decision-making in a complex scenario. The approach has two principal inspirations. The first is Anthony Weston’s scenario-based teaching. Weston’s concept of a scenario is a situation that changes in response to choices made by participants, according to an inner logic. Scenarios can dynamically explore open-ended complex problems without imposing predetermined (...)
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  33.  82
    “The Relation Between Art and Ethics in Ancient Greek Society”- Focusing on Hegel's account of ancient Greek epic and tragedy.Mohaddeseh Rabbaninia - 2018 - Logos 1 (3):162-171.
    In the chapter Spirit of the book "Phenomenology of spirit" in a section called "True spirit, ethical Life", Hegel looks into the happy state of "ethical life" in Greece. The concept of ethical life is a very crucial concept because it formulates Hegel's fundamental political and social ideal, which is to establish synthesis between the community and the individual. In this research, we study the ethical life of people who are unreasonably immersed in the customs and laws of a certain (...)
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  34. The Animal Is Present: The Ethics of Animal Use in Contemporary Art.Anthony Cross - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (4):519-528.
    In recent years, an increasing number of contemporary artists have incorporated live animals into their work. Although this development has attracted a great deal of attention in the artworld and among animal rights activists, it has not been much discussed in the philosophy of art—which is quite remarkable, given the serious ethical and artistic questions that these artworks prompt. I focus on answering two such questions. First, is the use of animals in these artworks ethically objectionable? Or are such artworks (...)
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  35. Dividing Walls and Unifying Murals: Diego Rivera and John Dewey on the Restoration of Art within Life.Terrance MacMullan - 2012 - Inter-American Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):44-59.
    English Abstract In Art as Experience, John Dewey decried the estrangement of art from lived human experience, both by artificial conceptual walls and the physical walls that secluded art within museums. Instead he argued that making and enjoying art are crucial organic functions that sustain communities and integrate individuals within their environments. In the 1920’s Diego Rivera became one of the luminaries of the Mexican muralist movement by creating frescoes that were rooted in Mexican life, both in their subject matter (...)
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  36. The Serendipity Mindset: The Art and Science of Creating Good Luck.Christian Busch (ed.) - 2020 - New York, USA: Penguin.
    Good luck isn’t just chance—it can be learned and leveraged—and The Serendipity Mindset explains how you can use serendipity to make life better at work, at home—everywhere. Many of us believe that the great turning points and opportunities in our lives happen by chance, that they’re out of our control. Often we think that successful people—and successful companies and organizations—are simply luckier than the rest of us. Good fortune—serendipity—just seems to happen to them. Is that true? Or are some people (...)
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  37. Non/Living Queerings, Undoing Certainties, and Braiding Vulnerabilities: A Collective Reflection.Marietta Radomska, Mayra Citlalli Rojo Gomez, Margherita Pevere & Terike Haapoja - 2021 - Artnodes 27:1-10.
    The ongoing global pandemic of Covid-19 has exposed SARS-CoV-2 as a potent non-human actant that resists the joint scientific, public health and socio-political efforts to contain and understand both the virus and the illness. Yet, such a narrative appears to conceal more than it reveals. The seeming agentiality of the novel coronavirus is itself but one manifestation of the continuous destruction of biodiversity, climate change, socio-economic inequalities, neocolonialism, overconsumption and the anthropogenic degradation of nature. Furthermore, focusing on the virus – (...)
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  38. Successors of Socrates, Disciples of Descartes, and Followers of Freud. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 2001 - Apeiron 34 (2):181 - 193.
    All three books reviewed here are turning over again for us the pages of perennially irresistible thinkers whose ideas never cease to hold us transfixed; all three are inviting us to notice that the material that we thought we knew has got more to do with what Nehamas calls 'the art of living' than we might have realised; and all three are making space for attitudes, responses and areas of self-understanding that are, by traditional classifications, irrational and hence sometimes (...)
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  39. Games: Agency as Art.C. Thi Nguyen - 2020 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Games occupy a unique and valuable place in our lives. Game designers do not simply create worlds; they design temporary selves. Game designers set what our motivations are in the game and what our abilities will be. Thus: games are the art form of agency. By working in the artistic medium of agency, games can offer a distinctive aesthetic value. They support aesthetic experiences of deciding and doing. -/- And the fact that we play games shows something remarkable about us. (...)
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  40. MINE THE GAP. FINE ARTS IN THE AGE OF PANDEMIC.Gizela Horvath - 2020 - In Gizela Horvath & Rozália Klára Bakó (eds.), Mind the Gap! Proceedings of the Sixth Argumentor Conference held in Oradea/Nagyvárad, Romania, 11–12 September 2020. pp. 229-241.
    The necessary condition for the reception of art is aesthetic distance, which paradoxically relies on direct experience: one has to be there in front of the artwork, has to live the experience. Therefore, the current pandemic and the practice of social distancing, which attempts to slow it down, is a serious challenge for the arts. This text analyses the ways in which artists and the institutions which mediate art react to the conditions caused by the pandemic. I will present some (...)
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  41. Digital Art and Their Uniqueness without Aura.Ahmad Ibrahim Badry & Akhyar Yusuf Lubis - 2018 - In Melani Budianta, Manneke Budiman, Abidin Kusno & Mikihiro Moriyama (eds.), Cultural Dynamics in Globalized World. Routledge. pp. 89-95.
    Modern technology plays an important role in our daily lives. Many people use technology for their works, interactions, and special interests such as art. Art as a discipline, which expresses human emotion and creative side, takes a new form for its contextualization with the help of information technology. A neologism for this discipline is “digital art.” Some experts who employ a traditional value in their aesthetical perspective consider this new approach unlikely. Walter Benjamin, an eminent figure from this group, stated (...)
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  42. What is philosophy as a way of life? Why philosophy as a way of life?Stephen R. Grimm & Caleb Cohoe - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):236-251.
    Despite a recent surge of interest in philosophy as a way of life, it is not clear what it might mean for philosophy to guide one's life, or how a “philosophical” way of life might differ from a life guided by religion, tradition, or some other source. We argue against John Cooper that spiritual exercises figure crucially in the idea of philosophy as a way of life—not just in the ancient world but also today, at least if the idea is (...)
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  43. Iris Murdoch on Art, Ethics, and Attention.Anil Gomes - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (3):321-337.
    Can the experience of great art play a role in our coming to understand the ethical framework of another person? In this article I draw out three themes from Iris Murdoch’s ‘The Sovereignty of Good’ in order to show the role that communal attention to works of art can play in our ethical lives. I situate this role in the context of Murdoch’s wider philosophical views.
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  44. Ethics and Aesthetics: Alfredo Jaar and the Role of Art in Political Critique.Carolina Drake - manuscript
    Art has a major role in political critique and in the contemporary world of art, ethics, politics, and aesthetics intersect. Using the work of Alfredo Jaar as an example of these intersections, I argue through my reading of Judith Butler, that his art can provide us with better, more egalitarian versions of populations to be perceived as grievable. Once we apprehend grievability, we can affectively apprehend that lives in the context of war and violence are precarious. Here lies the power (...)
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  45. Holy Terror and the Beauty of It All: how to live with existential anxiety.Dan J. Bruiger - 2021 - Hornby Island, BC V0R 1Z0, Canada: Left Field Press.
    Despite confident assertions by science and religion, no one can be absolutely certain what is going on in this drama we call existence. We are haunted by the realization that we are finite, vulnerable, mortal, and perhaps meaningless creatures. The ambiguity in all experience leaves us in a state of fundamental uncertainty, with a buried anxiety underlined by fear of mortality. However, the ability to consider consciousness as a personal creation enables us to appreciate experience for its own sake, despite (...)
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  46. Neutrality, Cultural Literacy, and Arts Funding.Jack Alexander Hume - 2024 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 10 (55):1588-1617.
    Despite the widespread presence of public arts funding in liberal societies, some liberals find it unjustified. According to the Neutrality Objection, arts funding preferences some ways of life. One way to motivate this challenge is to say that a public goods-styled justification, although it could relieve arts funding of these worries of partiality, cannot be argued for coherently or is, in the end, too susceptible to impressions of partiality. I argue that diversity-based arts funding can overcome this challenge, because it (...)
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  47. Why We Need the Arts: John Macmurray on Education and the Emotions.Esther McIntosh - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (1):47-60.
    This article argues that Macmurray’s work on education is deserving of serious consideration, because it offers an account of the person that highlights the significance of the emotions and the arts. In particular, the article examines and teases out the areas of Macmurray’s concept of the person that are pertinent to the philosophy of education, which includes the contention that the emotions can and should be educated. Furthermore, on the basis of Macmurray’s work, this article argues that emotional competency is (...)
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  48. Prosthetic Godhood and Lacan’s Alethosphere: The Psychoanalytic Significance of the Interplay of Randomness and Structure in Generative Art.Rayan Magon - 2023 - 26Th Generative Art Conference.
    Psychoanalysis, particularly as articulated by figures like Freud and Lacan, highlights the inherent division within the human subject—a schism between the conscious and unconscious mind. It could be said that this suggests that such an internal division becomes amplified in the context of generative art, where technology and algorithms are used to generate artistic expressions that are meant to emerge from the depths of the unconscious. Here, we encounter the tension between the conscious artist and the generative process itself, which (...)
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  49.  51
    The Singing Voice’s Charms. Aesthetic and Transformative Aspects of Singing in Literature, Art, and Philosophy.Małgorzata A. Szyszkowska - 2022 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 6 (2):26-36.
    Music, as sung and listened to, has been described in many a tale as powerful and transformative. Yet, the important question is not so much if that claim is true or whether it may be verified, but what kind of power and transformation are alluded to in those mythical and literary sources? Taking these symbolic claims and elaborating on their possible meaning, alongside thinkers such as Carolyne Abbate or Roland Barthes, proceeds to find ways in which these claims may suggest (...)
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  50. Affect, Belief, and the Arts.Rami Gabriel - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 2.
    The cultural project is a therapeutic melding of emotion, symbols, and knowledge. In this paper, I describe how spiritual emotions engendered through encounters in imaginative culture enable fixation of metaphysical beliefs. Evolved affective systems are domesticated through the social practices of imaginative culture so as to adapt people to live in culturally defined cooperative groups. Conditioning, as well as tertiary-level cognitive capacities such as symbols and language are enlisted to bond groups through the imaginative formats of myth and participatory ritual. (...)
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