Results for 'literariness'

774 found
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  1. Literary Intentionalism.Robbie Kubala - 2019 - Metaphilosophy 50 (4):503-515.
    In the philosophical debate about literary interpretation, the actual intentionalist claims, and the anti-intentionalist denies, that an acceptable interpretation of fictional literature must be constrained by the author’s intentions. I argue that a close examination of the two most influential recent strands in this debate reveals a surprising convergence. Insofar as both sides (a) focus on literary works as they are, where work identity is determined in part by certain (successfully realized) categorial intentions concerning, e.g., title, genre, and large-scale instances (...)
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  2. Traditional literary interpretation versus subversive interpretation.Terence Rajivan Edward - 2022 - Asian Journal of Advances in Research 16 (3):34-39.
    I present some objections to traditional literary interpretation and consider subversive interpretation as a solution to these problems. Subversive interpretation may seem more scientific and more democratic than traditional interpretation, but it is open to doubt that it is more democratic.
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  3. Can Literary Fiction be Suppositional Reasoning?Gilbert Plumer - 2020 - In Catarina Dutilh Novaes, Henrike Jansen, Jan Albert Van Laar & Bart Verheij (eds.), Reason to Dissent: Proceedings of the 3rd European Conference on Argumentation, Vol. III. College Publications+. pp. 279-289.
    Suppositional reasoning can seem spooky. Suppositional reasoners allegedly (e.g.) “extract knowledge from the sheer workings of their own minds” (Rosa), even where the knowledge is synthetic a posteriori. Can literary fiction pull such a rabbit out of its hat? Where P is a work’s fictional ‘premise’, some hold that some works reason declaratively (supposing P, Q), imperatively (supposing P, do Q), or interrogatively (supposing P, Q?), and that this can be a source of knowledge if the reasoning is good. True, (...)
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  4. Literary Indiscernibles, Referential Forgery, and the Possibility of Allographic Art.Jake Spinella - 2023 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 81 (3):306-316.
    Peter Lamarque, in chapter 4 of his 2010 book Work and Object, argues that certain artworks, like musical scores and literary texts, are such that there can be no forgeries of them that purport to be of an actually existing work—what Lamarque calls “referential forgeries”. Lamarque motivates this claim via appeal to another distinction, first made by Goodman, between “allographic” and “autographic” artworks. This article will evaluate Lamarque’s argument that allographic literary works are unable to be referentially forged and will (...)
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  5. Translating Literariness: A Cognitive Poetic Account.Yanchun Zhao - 2017 - Journal of Human Cognition 2 (1):18-29.
    This paper inquires into literariness, a much neglected problem in translation, from a cognitive poetic perspective; it tries to show the nature of proxy as concerns translation through various illustrations, hence what is termed by Bausse-Beier the proxy principle, and in passing answer the philosophical problem of translatability or untranslatability. Literariness, not limited to literature, may exist in all texts. It can be defined as the form of a text that is suggestive of something, different from that of (...)
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  6. A literary approach to scientific practice: R. I. G. Hughes: The theoretical practices of physics: Philosophical essays. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010, 289pp, £35.00, $ 75.00 HB.Seamus Bradley - 2010 - Metascience 20 (2):363--367.
    A literary approach to scientific practice: Essay Review of R.I.G. Hughes' _The Theoretical Practices of Physics_.
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  7. The Aesthetic Value of Literary Works in Roman Ingarden’s Philosophy.Hicham Jakha - 2022 - Kultura I Wartości (32):165-185.
    In this paper, I attempt to formulate an Ingardenian conception of the literary work’s aesthetic value. Following Mitscherling’s lead, I attempt to place Ingarden’s aesthetics within his overall phenomenological-ontological project. That is, I argue that Ingarden’s aesthetics can only be properly fathomed in the context of his ontological deliberations, since, as he himself often enunciated, all his philosophical investigations constitute a realist rejoinder to Husserl’s turn toward transcendental idealism. To this end, I bring together insights from his aesthetics and ontology (...)
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  8. Literary Setting and the Postcolonial City in No Longer at Ease.Liam Kruger - 2021 - Research in African Literatures 52 (3):62-86.
    This paper considers Achebe's No Longer at Ease in terms of its modest canonical fortunes and its peculiar formal construction. The paper argues that the novel's urban setting is produced through an emergent and local noir style, that this setting indexes the increasing centrality of the city in late colonial African life, and that it formally responds to the success of Achebe's rural Things Fall Apart and its problematic status as a paradigmatic African text. The paper suggests that No Longer (...)
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  9. Why literary devices matter.Lorraine K. C. Yeung - 2021 - Polish Journal of Aesthetics 60 (1):19-37.
    This paper investigates the emotional import of literary devices deployed in fiction. Reflecting on the often-favored approach in the analytic tradition that locates fictional characters, events, and narratives as sources of readers’ emotions, I attempt to broaden the scope of analysis by accounting for how literary devices trigger non-cognitive emotions. I argue that giving more expansive consideration to literary devices by which authors present content facilitates a better understanding of how fiction engages emotion. In doing so, I also explore the (...)
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  10. Cognition and Literary Ethical Criticism.Gilbert Plumer - 2011 - In Frank Zenker (ed.), Argumentation: Cognition & Community. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation (OSSA), May 18--21, 2011. OSSA. pp. 1-9.
    “Ethical criticism” is an approach to literary studies that holds that reading certain carefully selected novels can make us ethically better people, e.g., by stimulating our sympathetic imagination (Nussbaum). I try to show that this nonargumentative approach cheapens the persuasive force of novels and that its inherent bias and censorship undercuts what is perhaps the principal value and defense of the novel—that reading novels can be critical to one’s learning how to think.
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  11. Literary theory: a practical introduction: readings of William Shakespeare, King Lear, Henry James, "The Aspern papers," Elizabeth Bishop, The complete poems 1927-1979, Toni Morrison, The bluest eye.Michael Ryan - 1999 - Malden, Mass.: Blackwell.
    Michael Ryan's Literary Theory: A Practical Introduction, Second Edition introduces students to the full range of contemporary approaches to the study of literature and culture, from Formalism, Structuralism, and Historicism to Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies, and Global English. Introduces readings from a variety of theoretical perspectives, on classic literary texts. Demonstrates how the varying perspectives on texts can lead to different interpretations of the same work. Contains an accessible account of different theoretical approaches An ideal resource for use in introductory (...)
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  12. Literary Interventions in Justice: A Symposium.Kate Kirkpatrick, Rafe McGregor & Karen Simecek - 2021 - Estetika: The European Journal of Aesthetics 58 (2):160-78.
    The purpose of this symposium is to explore the ways in which literature, broadly construed to include poetry and narrative in a variety of modes of representation, can change the world by providing interventions in justice. Our approach foregrounds the relationship between the activity demanded by some individual literary works and some categories of literary work on the one hand and the way in which those works can make a tangible difference to social reality on the other. We consider three (...)
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  13. Literary theory and the phenomenology of the comma.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    Jacques Derrida’s “Signature Event Context” is one of the most famous papers in literary theory, but there are aspects of it which, in my experience, are not commented on. Why are there no commas in the title? I present a puzzle, but there is a solution which I presume many will quickly go for.
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  14. The literary kiss: gestures of subterfuge.Bethel Erastus-Obilo - 2013 - Neohelicon 40 (1): 315–324.
    A complex, polyvalent phenomenon, the kiss, once embedded in a literary text, is first and foremost a cipher to be decoded. Texts effectively expose its many-sidedness: not merely its potentially seductive power or ostensible expression of affection, but, no less compellingly, its risky demeanors, its capacity to establish dominance, to terrorize, to subdue, to belittle, to ingratiate, even to infuriate. Variously bestowed, retracted, avowed, disavowed, meaningful, meaningless, the kiss can become, as it does in the work so named by Kate (...)
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  15. Literary Narrative and Mental Imagery: A View from Embodied Cognition.Anezka Kuzmicova - 2014 - Style 48 (3):275-293.
    The objective of this article is twofold. In the first part, I discuss two issues central to any theoretical inquiry into mental imagery: embodiment and consciousness. I do so against the backdrop of second-generation cognitive science, more specifically the increasingly popular research framework of embodied cognition, and I consider two caveats attached to its current exploitation in narrative theory. In the second part, I attempt to cast new light on readerly mental imagery by offering a typology of what I propose (...)
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  16. Unlocking Literary Insights: Predicting Book Ratings with Neural Networks.Mahmoud Harara & Samy S. Abu-Naser - 2023 - International Journal of Engineering and Information Systems (IJEAIS) 7 (10):22-27.
    Abstract: This research delves into the utilization of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) as a powerful tool for predicting the overall ratings of books by leveraging a diverse set of attributes. To achieve this, we employ a comprehensive dataset sourced from Goodreads, enabling us to thoroughly examine the intricate connections between the different attributes of books and the ratings they receive from readers. In our investigation, we meticulously scrutinize how attributes such as genre, author, page count, publication year, and reader reviews (...)
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  17. No brilliant friend? Literary acknowledgement between the sexes.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This paper responds to an essay by Elena Ferrante on male literary figures acknowledging the influence of female ones. She poses a question about her reception by males which I address.
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  18. Philosophical Criticism and Literary Criticism.Abduljaleel Kadhim Alwali - 1997 - .Abhaath Journal 1 (1):51-69.
    Writer, book and reader. Without writer and writings wouldn’t have been a reader. Hence, there wouldn’t have been criticism. The basis of human intellectual criticism depends on three basic elements: The writer, the book, and the reader. Criticism was essentially linked with the discovery of writing. Criticism as an idea is basically linked with human consciousness. Maturity, writing has merely added a new dimension to it namely criticism and synthesis, in which literature and philosophy has contributed greatly, despite the differences (...)
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  19. The Aesthetic and Literary Qualities of Scientific Thought Experiments.Alice Murphy - 2020 - In Milena Ivanova & Steven French (eds.), The Aesthetics of Science: Beauty, Imagination and Understanding. New York: Routledge.
    Is there a role for aesthetic judgements in science? One aspect of scientific practice, the use of thought experiments, has a clear aesthetic dimension. Thought experiments are creatively produced artefacts that are designed to engage the imagination. Comparisons have been made between scientific (and philosophical) thought experiments and other aesthetically appreciated objects. In particular, thought experiments are said to share qualities with literary fiction as they invite us to imagine a fictional scenario and often have a narrative form (Elgin 2014). (...)
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  20.  64
    Thought Experiments & Literary Learning.McComb Geordie - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Toronto, St. George Campus
    In my dissertation, I develop a novel approach to thought experiments and literary learning. It’s novel primarily because, unlike many prominent approaches, it has us refrain from advancing theories, from giving logical analyses, and from explicating. We are, instead, to proceed in a way inspired by Wittgenstein’s writings. We are, that is, to clarify words that give rise to problems and to clear those problems away. To clarify words, we may compare language games in which figure terms like “thought experiment.” (...)
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  21. Authors, Intentions and Literary Meaning.Sherri Irvin - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (2):114–128.
    This article discusses the relationship (or lack thereof) between authors’ intentions and the meaning of literary works. It considers the advantages and disadvantages of Extreme and Modest Actual Intentionalism, Conventionalism, and two versions of Hypothetical Intentionalism, and discusses the role that one’s theoretical commitments about the robustness of linguistic conventions and the publicity of literary works should play in determining which view one accepts.
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  22. Literary Girls, by K*thleen St*ck: chapter 2, the low-high culture divide.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This paper is a response to Kathleen Stock’s book Material Girls, by way of imitation. I have attempted to write a faux chapter in the book’s style, identifying four moments in overcoming the low-high culture divide in responses to the arts.
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  23. Ideal Theory, Literary Theory, Whither Transfeminism?Matthew J. Cull - forthcoming - In Hilkje Hänel & Johanna Müller (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Non-Ideal Theory. Routledge.
    In 2005, Charles Mills published “‘Ideal Theory’ as Ideology” in Hypatia: a withering critique of much of contemporary political philosophy and ethics. For Mills such work in philosophy failed to attend to the realities of social life and politics, and in remaining silent on actual issues of domination and oppression served an ideological role in supporting the interests of white bourgeois men. Around the time that Charles Mills launched his broadside against ideal theory, trans theorists had been fighting their own (...)
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  24. Literary Cognitivism.James Harold - 2015 - In Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. New York: Routledge.
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  25. Literary Girls, by K*thleen St*ck: chapter 5, realism.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    In this paper, I present a pastiche of Kathleen Stock responding to Raymond Tallis’s defence of realism. It is followed by a note in which I briefly explain why I have approached this task by means of pastiche.
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  26. Wittgenstein and His Literary Executors.Christian Erbacher - 2016 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 4 (3).
    Rush Rhees, Georg Henrik von Wright and Elizabeth Anscombe are well known as the literary executors who made Ludwig Wittgenstein’s later philosophy available to all interested readers. Their editions of Wittgenstein’s writings have become an integral part of the modern philosophical canon. However, surprisingly little is known about the circumstances and reasons that made Wittgenstein choose them to edit and publish his papers. This essay sheds light on these questions by presenting the story of their personal relationships—relationships that, on the (...)
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  27. Literary Girls, by K*thleen St*ck: chapter 4, pastiche of the long dead.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This paper is an imitative response to Kathleen Stock’s book Material Girls, another faux chapter. This effort may be fractionally closer by some measures than my previous effort. I include an appendix with my own response to the essayist targeted: Alain Robbe-Grillet.
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  28. From the Margins of the Neoliberal University: Notes Toward Nomadic Literary Studies.Neil Vallelly - 2019 - Poetics Today 40 (1):59-79.
    Literary studies are living a nomadic existence on the margins of the neoliberal university, forced to adapt to the needs of more profitable disciplines and the insidious marketization of higher education to find an intellectual home. By drawing on Rosi Braidotti’s nomadic theory, this article situates the current state of literary studies in the wider networks of power relations that differentially distribute nomadic experiences in the contemporary world. The article begins with an examination of the contradictions of nomadic mobility in (...)
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  29. 'A Friend, A Nimble Mind, and a Book': Girls' Literary Criticism in Seventeen Magazine, 1958-1969.Jill Anderson - 2020 - Journal of American Studies 55 (2):1-26.
    This article argues that postwar Seventeen magazine, a publication deeply invested in enforcing heteronormativity and conventional models of girlhood and womanhood, was in fact a more complex and multivocal serial text whose editors actively sought out, cultivated, and published girls’ creative and intellectual work. Seventeen's teen-authored “Curl Up and Read” book review columns, published from 1958 through 1969, are examples of girls’ creative intellectual labor, introducing Seventeen's readers to fiction and nonfiction which ranged beyond the emerging “young-adult” literature of the (...)
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  30. Narrative and the Literary Imagination.John Gibson - 2014 - In Allen Speight (ed.), Narrative, Philosophy & Life. Springer. pp. 135-50.
    This paper attempts to reconcile two apparently opposed ways of thinking about the imagination and its relationship to literature, one which casts it as essentially concerned with fiction-making and the other with culture-making. The literary imagination’s power to create fictions is what gives it its most obvious claim to “autonomy”, as Kant would have it: its freedom to venture out in often wild and spectacular excess of reality. The argument of this paper is that we can locate the literary imagination’s (...)
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  31. The Literary Work of Art.Translated with an introduction by George G. Grabowicz, Foreword by David M. Levin. [REVIEW]Barry Smith - 1975 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 6 (2):141-144.
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  32. Vattimo and Literary Understanding: An Essay in Recent Hermeneutics.William Melaney - 1995 - International Studies in Philosophy (1):51-62.
    Gianni Vattimo's collection of essays, 'The End of Modernity', published in Italian in 1985, opens up a postmodern understanding of hermeneutics that derives from revisionary readings of both Heidegger and Nietzsche. Particularly in opposing the 'strong' interpretations of cultural history, Vattimo's "weal thinking" invites us to reopen the question of modernity. This paper offers a hermeneutical reassessment of the modern as a category and a critical reappraisal of Heidegger's notion of 'Verwindung' in terms of the philosopher's late work. The literary (...)
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  33. Hemingway: literary crapp?Mota Victor - manuscript
    is literature a kind of redemption from ourselves?
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  34. Partial Evidence: An enquiry concerning a possible affinity between literary moral cognitivism and moral pluralism.Peter Shum - 2017 - Interdisciplinary Literary Studies 19 (3):372-395.
    This paper begins by affirming the view that if there is a debate to be had over whether literature can convey moral knowledge, then efforts by proponents to substantiate this claim will already be necessarily conditioned by an understanding of what morality consists in, independently of literature. This observation brings to light a certain danger for the debate, namely that if participants fail to explicitly specify the ethical theory that they rely on, then the debate can seem nebulous. This raises (...)
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  35. Vattimo and Literary Understanding.William D. Melaney - 1995 - International Studies in Philosophy 27 (1):51-62.
    The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how Gianni Vattimo offers a new interpretation of history that challenges standard accounts of the modern period and promotes a new approach to literature. The paper begins with a discussion of how the Cartesian cogito provides an inadequate basis for historical research, and then proposes that modern history can be 'read' when it is reassessed through recent hermeneutics. In 'The End of Modernity' (1985), Vattimo indicates that Heidegger's understanding of the "overcoming (...)
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  36. Reading Todorov’s The Fantastic: A Structural Approach to a Literary Genre.Irfan Ajvazi - manuscript
    Reading Todorov’s The Fantastic: A Structural Approach to a Literary Genre - Irfan Ajvazi.
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  37. Can Literature be Moral Philosophy? A Sceptical View on the Ethics of Literary Empathy.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran - 2011 - In Sebastian Hüsch (ed.), Philosopy and Literature and the Crisis of Metaphysics. Würzburg: Verlag Königshausen & Neumann.
    One important aspect of Nussbaum´s thesis on the moral value of literature concerns the power of literature to enhance our ability to empathise with other minds. This aspect will be the focus of the current article. My aim is to reflect upon this question regarding the moral value of our empathy for fictional characters. The article is structured in two main parts. I will first examine the concept of “empathy” and distinguish between empathy for human beings and empathy for fictional (...)
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  38. The Literary Genius of Guru Gobind Singh.Devinder Pal Singh - 1999 - The Sikh Review 47 (4):35-39.
    Guru Gobind Singh was a many splendoured genius, possessed of extraordinary qualities of virtue and valour, service and sacrifice, solider and scholar. He was not only a great warrior but a prolific writer and a poet of high calibre. The brief span of forty-two years of his life is full of much activity. He wrote in many languages. It is said that fourteen maunds load of manuscripts were lost in Sirsa when the Guru was being pursued from Anandpur to Chamkaur. (...)
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  39. Claiming the Domain of the Literary: Mourning the Death of Reading Fiction.Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2016 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (June (6)):505-11.
    This essay reviews the domain of the literary contrasting it with other intellectual discourses; especially philosophy. It establishes the superiority of literature over philosophy. And mentions the philosophies informing literature. The essay is written consciously with copious endnotes, contrary to current ways of writing. The essay proper is simple; the endnotes often mock jargon and mimic pedantry.
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  40. The epithets as literary resources from which Zeus is configured as an Olympic deity.Carlos Alberto Rosas Jimenez - 2002 - Aula de Letras 1 (1):1-16.
    The Iliad is a work of great poetic temperament, and by analyzing its content we can see how, through the development of the theme of the Trojan War, cultural categories are created that have acquired an immeasurable value in the life of the human being. For this reason, it is worth pausing to analyze the text from different points of view, from which one can begin to understand how those categories are created that, without being aware of it, manifest themselves (...)
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  41. Literary Form, Philosophical Content. [REVIEW]Rick Anthony Furtak - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (2):182-184.
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  42. Presence in the reading of literary narrative: A case for motor enactment.Anežka Kuzmičová - 2012 - Semiotica 2012 (189):23-48.
    Drawing on research in narrative theory and literary aesthetics, text and discourse processing, phenomenology and the experimental cognitive sciences, this paper outlines an embodied theory of presence in the reading of literary narrative. Contrary to common assumptions, it is argued that there is no straightforward relation between the degree of detail in spatial description on one hand, and the vividness of spatial imagery and presence on the other. It is also argued that presence arises from a first-person, enactive process of (...)
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  43. Professor (Literary Philosopher).Yemi-D. Ogunyem/Prince - manuscript
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  44. Jacobi as literary author.George di Giovanni - 2023 - In Alexander J. B. Hampton (ed.), Friedrich Jacobi and the end of the enlightenment: religion, philosophy, and reason at the crux of modernity. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. pp. 286-301.
    This article examines Jacobi's two novels, Allwill and Woldemar indirectly showing how much Allwill prefigures Kierkegaard's Seduce in Either/Or and the plot of Woldemar Hegel's final scene of Section VI of his Phenomenology of Spirit.
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  45. The Problem of Temporality in the Literary Framework of Nicholas of Cusa’s De pace fidei.Jason Aleksander - 2014 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 1 (2):135-145.
    This paper explores Nicholas of Cusa’s framing of the De pace fidei as a dialogue taking place incaelo rationis. On the one hand, this framing allows Nicholas of Cusa to argue that all religious rites presuppose the truth of a single, unified faith and so temporally manifest divine logos in a way accommodated to the historically unique conventions of different political communities. On the other hand, at the end of the De pace fidei, the interlocutors in the heavenly dialogue are (...)
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  46. Roman Ingarden: Ontological Foundations for Literary Theory.Barry Smith - 1979 - In John Odmark (ed.), Language, Literature and Meaning I: Problems of Literary Theory. Benjamins. pp. 373-390.
    The paper seeks to apply the work of the Polish phenomenologist Roman Ingarden to certain problems in literary theory; contrasts the notions of ontological and epistemological incompleteness of the represented objects of a literary work and considers the question of the nature of such objects. The paper concludes by analyzing some of the degrees of freedom possessed by the readings of literary work in relation to the work itself.
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  47. Mental Imagery, Emotion, and Literary Task Sets Clues Towards a Literary Neuroart.Federico Langer - 2012 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (7-8):168-215.
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  48. Outer vs. inner reverberations: Verbal auditory imagery and meaning-making in literary narrative.Anezka Kuzmicova - 2013 - Journal of Literary Theory 7 (1-2):111-134.
    It is generally acknowledged that verbal auditory imagery, the reader's sense of hearing the words on a page, matters in the silent reading of poetry. Verbal auditory imagery (VAI) in the silent reading of narrative prose, on the other hand, is mostly neglected by literary and other theorists. This is a first attempt to provide a systematic theoretical account of the felt qualities and underlying cognitive mechanics of narrative VAI, drawing on convergent evidence from the experimental cognitive sciences, psycholinguistic theory, (...)
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  49. "Questioning Interdisciplinarity: Cognitive Science, Evolutionary Psychology, and Literary Criticism".Tony E. Jackson - 2000 - Poetics Today 21 (2):319-347.
    Cognitive science and evolutionary psychology show great potential as explanatory paradigms for a wide array of cultural products and activities, including literature. In some scholars’ minds these two fields are emerging as the cornerstones of a major ‘‘new interdisciplinarity’’ that may well displace the relativistic interpretive paradigms that have dominated the humanities for the last few decades. Through a review of a number of recently published works, I assess the situation of these two fields in relation to the specific, currently (...)
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  50.  84
    Soul and Reason in Literary Criticism: Deconstructing the Deconstructionists.Jonathan Chaves - 2002 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 122 (4):828.
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