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  1. added 2017-12-11
    Leer hoy «Reason in Common Sense» de Santayana.Jaime Nubiola - 2017 - Limbo 37:11-34.
    In this article I pay attention to some of the reviews that Reason in Common Sense of George Santayana received from some of the most outstanding philosophers of his time: E. Albee, J. Dewey, A.W. Moore, G. E. Moore, C. S. Peirce and F. C S. Schiller. My paper is arranged in six sections: 1) Biographical circumstances of Reason in Common Sense; 2) Peirce’s reading of Santayana; 3) The reviews of John Dewey; 4) Other readers of Reason in Common Sense; (...)
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  2. added 2017-08-08
    John McCormick: 1918-2010.Martin A. Coleman - 2010 - Overheard in Seville 28 (28):39-39.
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  3. added 2014-03-19
    Thinking in the Ruins: Wittgenstein and Santayana on Contingency (Review). [REVIEW]Henry Jackman - 2001 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (3):251-253.
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  4. added 2013-01-08
    A Pragmatist Conception of Certainty: Wittgenstein and Santayana.Guy Bennett-Hunter - 2012 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 4 (2):146-157.
    The ways in which Wittgenstein was directly influenced by William James (by his early psychological work as well his later philosophy) have been thoroughly explored and charted by Russell B. Goodman. In particular, Goodman has drawn attention to the pragmatist resonances of the Wittgensteinian notion of hinge propositions as developedand articulated in the posthumously edited and published work, On Certainty. This paper attempts to extend Goodman’s observation, moving beyond his focus on James (specifically, James’s Pragmatism) as his pragmatist reference point. (...)
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  5. added 2011-11-22
    Dewey's Naturalistic Metaphysics: Expostulations and Replies.Randy L. Friedman - 2011 - Education and Culture 27 (2):48-73.
    Critics of Dewey’s metaphysics point to his dismissal of any philosophy which locates ideals in a realm beyond experience. However, Dewey’s sustained critique of dualistic philosophies is but a first step in his reconstruction and recovery of the function of the metaphysical. Detaching the discussion of values from inquiry, whether scientific, philosophical or educational, produces the same end as relegating values to a transcendent realm that is beyond ordinary human discourse. Dewey’s naturalistic metaphysics supports his progressive educational philosophy. The duty (...)
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  6. added 2011-05-31
    “It Doesn’T... Matter Where You Begin”: Pound and Santayana on Education.Martin Coleman - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (4):1-17.
    American poet Ezra Pound wrote a letter on February 6, 1940, inviting American philosopher George Santayana to join poet T. S. Eliot and himself in writing “a volume . . . on the Ideal University, or The Proper Curriculum, or how it would be possible to educate and/or (mostly or) civilize the university student.” Santayana declined the invitation and claimed to have no ideas on the subject of education. Participation would have been morally impossible, he wrote, because unlike Pound and (...)
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  7. added 2009-10-01
    Emerson and Santayana on Imagination.H. G. Callaway - 2007 - In Flamm And Skowronski (ed.), Under Any Sky, Contemporary Readings on George Santayana.
    This paper examines Santayana on imagination, and related themes, chiefly as these are expressed in his early work, Interpretations of Poetry and Religion (1900). My hypothesis is that Santayana under-estimates, in this book, the force and significance of the prevalent distinction between imagination and fancy, as this was originally put forward by Coleridge and later developed in Emerson’s late essays. I will focus on some of those aspects of Santayana’s book which appear to react to or to engage with Emerson’s (...)
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