Plato: Menexenus

Edited by Mark Zelcer (Queensborough Community College (CUNY))
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  1. Reading the Menexenus Intertextually.Mark Zelcer - 2018 - In Harold Parker & Max Robitzsch (eds.), Speeches for the Dead: Essays on Plato's Menexenus. Berlin: de Gruyter. pp. 29-49.
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  2. Socrates Agonistes: The Case of the Cratylus Etymologies.Rachel Barney - 1998 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 16:63-98.
    Are the long, wildly inventive etymologies in Plato’s Cratylus just some kind of joke, or does Plato himself accept them? This standard question misses the most important feature of the etymologies: they are a competitive performance, an agôn by Socrates in which he shows that he can play the game of etymologists like Cratylus better than they can themselves. Such show-off performances are a recurrent feature of Platonic dialogue: they include Socrates’ speeches on eros in the Phaedrus, his rhetorical discourse (...)
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