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  1. Hippocrates at Phaedrus 270c.Elizabeth Jelinek & Nickolas Pappas - 2020 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 101 (3):409-430.
    At Plato’s Phaedrus 270c, Socrates asks whether one can know souls without knowing ‘the whole.’ Phaedrus answers that ‘according to Hippocrates’ the same demand on knowing the whole applies to bodies. What parallel is intended between soul-knowledge and body-knowledge and which medical passages illustrate the analogy have been much debated. Three dominant interpretations read ‘the whole’ as respectively (1) environment, (2) kosmos, and (3) individual soul or body; and adduce supporting Hippocratic passages. But none of these interpretations accounts for the (...)
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  2. A Multiform Desire.Olof Pettersson - 2013 - Dissertation, Uppsala University
    This dissertation is a study of appetite in Plato’s Timaeus, Republic and Phaedrus. In recent research is it often suggested that Plato considers appetite (i) to pertain to the essential needs of the body, (ii) to relate to a distinct set of objects, e.g. food or drink, and (iii) to cause behaviour aiming at sensory pleasure. Exploring how the notion of appetite, directly and indirectly, connects with Plato’s other purposes in these dialogues, this dissertation sets out to evaluate these ideas. (...)
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  3. La alegoría del carro del alma en Platón y en la Kaṭha Upaniṣad.Paolo Magnone - 2012 - In Gerardo Rodriguez (ed.), Textos y contextos (II). Exégesis y hermenéutica de obras tardoantiguas y medievales. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata. pp. 87-126.
    [The Soul Chariot Allegory in Plato and the Kaṭha Upaniṣad].
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  4. Soul-Leading: The Unity of the Phaedrus, Again.Jessica Moss - 2012 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 43--1.
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  5. Contemplation and Self-Mastery in Plato's Phaedrus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 42:77-107.
    This chapter examines Plato's moral psychology in the Phaedrus. It argues against interpreters such as Burnyeat and Nussbaum that Plato's treatment of the soul is increasingly pessimistic: reason's desire to contemplate is at odds with its obligation to rule the soul, and psychic harmony can only be secured by violently suppressing the lower parts of the soul.
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  6. Platon, Phaidros 249BC: Über den Menschen.E. Sonderegger - 1996 - Hermes 124 (3):375–377.
    Abstract Platon, Phaidros 249bc A philological check of the grammar of this passage shows its philosophical impact. To be able to understand the many as unity, thanks to the ideas, is the specifity of us human beings.
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  7. The Rhetoric of Morality and Philosophy: Plato’s “Gorgias” and “Phaedrus”.Seth BENARDETE - 1991 - University of Chicago Press.
    Benardete here interprets and, for the first time, pairs two important Platonic dialogues, the Gorgias and the Phaedrus . In linking these dialogues, he places Socrates' notion of rhetoric in a new light and illuminates the way in which Plato gives morality and eros a place in the human soul.
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