Contents
5 found
Order:
  1. Plato’s Ion as an Ethical Performance.Toby Svoboda - 2021 - In Garry L. Hagberg (ed.), Fictional Worlds and the Moral Imagination. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 3-18.
    Plato’s Ion is primarily ethical rather than epistemological, investigating the implications of transgressing one’s own epistemic limits. The figures of Socrates and Ion are juxtaposed in the dialogue, Ion being a laughable, comic, ethically inferior character who cannot recognize his own epistemic limits, Socrates being an elevated, serious, ethically superior character who exhibits disciplined epistemic restraint. The point of the dialogue is to contrast Ion’s laughable state with the serious state of Socrates. In this sense, the dialogue’s central argument is (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Socrates.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Socrates_ presents a compelling case for some life-changing conclusions that follow from a close reading of Socrates' arguments. Offers a highly original study of Socrates and his thought, accessible to contemporary readers Argues that through studying Socrates we can learn practical wisdom to apply to our lives Lovingly crafted with humour, thought-experiments and literary references, and with close reading sof key Socratic arguments Aids readers with diagrams to make clear complex arguments.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  3. Ion.Gene Fendt - 1997 - International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):23-50.
    This reading of Plato's Ion shows that the philosophic action mimed and engendered by the dialogue thoroughly reverses its (and Plato's) often supposed philosophical point, revealing that poetry is just as defensible as philosophy, and only in the same way. It is by Plato's indirections we find true directions out: the war between philosophy and poetry is a hoax on Plato's part, and a mistake on the part of his literalist readers. The dilemma around which the dialogue moves is false, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Plato and the New Rhapsody.Dirk C. Baltzly - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):29-52.
    In Plato’s dialogues we often find Socrates talking at length about poetry. Sometimes he proposes censorship of certain works because what they say is false or harmful. Other times we find him interpreting the poets or rejecting potential interpretations of them. This raises the question of whether there is any consistent account to be given of Socrates’ practice as a literary critic. One might think that Plato himself in the Ion answers the question that I have raised. Rhapsody, at least (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Plato's idea of poetical inspiration.Eugène Napoleon Tigerstedt - 1969 - Helsinki,: Helsinki.
    The second article, in which the author suggests an analysis of other three authors' state of nature models and tries to define the role of the models in their respective law concepts. The analysis demonstrates that all three models share same basic idea, which is the concept of an independent reasonable individual; this very idea is what these different models are based upon. The concept of an individual itself does not have a substantiation.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations