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  1. Mental Models in Galileo’s Early Mathematization of Nature.Paolo Palmieri - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (2):229-264.
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  • On Galileo's Method of Causal Proportionality.Donald W. Mertz - 1980 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 11 (3):229.
    It is a common occurence to find Galileo claimed as the father of modern science, particularly as to his method being appropriate for its pursuit. Yet, it is apparent from the literature that little agreement has been reached concerning the specifics of the structure and nature of his method(s). Galileo himself is explicit in little more than describing it as „geometrical“, and as such contrasting its greater demonstrative power with that of the traditional Peripatetic logic. One is then left with (...)
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  • EPR and the 'Passage' of Time.Friedel Weinert - 2013 - Philosophia Naturalis 50 (2):173-199.
    The essay revisits the puzzle of the ‘passage’ of time in relation to EPR-type measurements and asks what philosophical consequences can be drawn from them. Some argue that the lack of invariance of temporal order in the measurement of a space-like related EPR pair, under relativistic motion, casts serious doubts on the ‘reality’ of the lapse of time. Others argue thatcertain features of quantum mechanics establisha tensed theory of time – understood here as Possibilism or the growing block universe. The (...)
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  • Descartes, Spacetime, and Relational Motion.Edward Slowik - 1999 - Philosophy of Science 66 (1):117-139.
    This paper examines Descartes' problematic relational theory of motion, especially when viewed within the context of his dynamics, the Cartesian natural laws. The work of various commentators on Cartesian motion is also surveyed, with particular emphasis placed upon the recent important texts of Garber and Des Chene. In contrast to the methodology of most previous interpretations, however, this essay employs a modern "spacetime" approach to the problem. By this means, the role of dynamics in Descartes' theory, which has often been (...)
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  • Descartes' Forgotten Hypotheses on Motion.Edward Slowik - 2002 - Journal of Philosophical Research 27:433-448.
    This essay explores two of the more neglected hypotheses that comprise, or supplement, Descartes’ relationalist doctrine of bodily motion. These criteria are of great importance, for they would appear to challenge Descartes’ principal judgment that motion is a purely reciprocal change of a body’s contiguous neighborhood. After critiquing the work of the few commentators who have previously examined these forgotten hypotheses, mainly, D. Garber and M. Gueroult, the overall strengths and weaknesses of Descartes’ supplementary criteria will be assessed. Overall, despite (...)
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  • “Strange Trajectories”: Naive Physics, Epistemology and History of Science.Francesco Crapanzano - 2018 - Transversal: International Journal for the Historiography of Science 5:49-65.
    In the 1980s naive physics almost suddenly became a field of research for physicists interested in teaching and experimental psychologists. Such research, however, was limited to accurately recording the bizarre Aristotelian responses of “layman” struggling with simple physics issues. Another research on this topic is that one of phenomenological origin: starting from the studies of the psychologist of perception Paolo Bozzi naive physics had entered the laboratory, and he was the first to find that the physical knowledge of the adult (...)
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  • Mathematical Models and Reality: A Constructivist Perspective. [REVIEW]Christian Hennig - 2010 - Foundations of Science 15 (1):29-48.
    To explore the relation between mathematical models and reality, four different domains of reality are distinguished: observer-independent reality, personal reality, social reality and mathematical/formal reality. The concepts of personal and social reality are strongly inspired by constructivist ideas. Mathematical reality is social as well, but constructed as an autonomous system in order to make absolute agreement possible. The essential problem of mathematical modelling is that within mathematics there is agreement about ‘truth’, but the assignment of mathematics to informal reality is (...)
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  • A Note on the Quantum Mechanical Measurement Process.Michael Drieschner - 2013 - Philosophia Naturalis 50 (2):201-213.
    Traditionally one main emphasis of the quantum mechanical measurement theory is on the question how the pure state of the compound system 'measured system + measuring apparatus' is transformed into the 'mixture' of all possible results of that measurement, weighted with their probability: the so-called “disappearance of the interference terms”. It is argued in this note that in reality there is no such transformation, so that there is no need to account for such a transformation theoretically. _German_ Gewöhnlich liegt ein (...)
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  • The Completeness of Physics.David Spurrett - 1999 - Dissertation, University of Natal, Durban
    The present work is focussed on the completeness of physics, or what is here called the Completeness Thesis: the claim that the domain of the physical is causally closed. Two major questions are tackled: How best is the Completeness Thesis to be formulated? What can be said in defence of the Completeness Thesis? My principal conclusions are that the Completeness Thesis can be coherently formulated, and that the evidence in favour if it significantly outweighs that against it. In opposition to (...)
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  • Science, Certainty, and Descartes.Gary Hatfield - 1988 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:249 - 262.
    During the 1630s Descartes recognized that he could not expect all legitimate claims in natural science to meet the standard of absolute certainty. The realization resulted from a change in his physics, which itself arose not through methodological reflections, but through developments in his substantive metaphysical doctrines. Descartes discovered the metaphysical foundations of his physics in 1629-30; as a consequence, the style of explanation employed in his physical writings changed. His early methodological conceptions, as preserved in the Rules and sketched (...)
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  • On Some Unwarranted Tacit Assumptions in Cognitive Neuroscience.Rainer Mausfeld - 2012 - Frontiers in Cognition 3 (67):1-13.
    The cognitive neurosciences are based on the idea that the level of neurons or neural networks constitutes a privileged level of analysis for the explanation of mental phenomena. This paper brings to mind several arguments to the effect that this presumption is ill-conceived and unwarranted in light of what is currently understood about the physical principles underlying mental achievements. It then scrutinizes the question why such conceptions are nevertheless currently prevailing in many areas of psychology. The paper argues that corresponding (...)
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  • A History of Science Approach to the Nature of Science.Nahum Kipnis - 2000 - In W. McComas (ed.), The Nature of Science in Science Education: Rationales and Strategies. pp. 177-196.
    I subordinated the discussion of historical and philosophical issues of science to learning scientific concepts, superimposing them so as to make them inseparable. The topics of units are the same as in regular science courses, such as "electrical conductors and nonconductors," and the goal is the same: to formulate the laws of phenomena. The difference is in the ways the unit is taught. I have found that understanding of a concept improves if it is "rediscovered" with active participation on the (...)
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  • N.R. Hanson on the Relation Between Philosophy and History of Science.Matthew Lund - unknown
    Despite having put the concept of HPS on the institutional map, N.R. Hanson’s distinctive account of the interdependence between history of science and philosophy of science has been mostly forgotten, and misinterpreted where it is remembered. It is argued that Hanson’s account is worthy of renewed attention and extension since, through its special emphasis on a variety of different normative criteria, it provides the framework for a fruitful and transformative interaction between the two disciplines. This essay also examines two separate (...)
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  • The Content of Science Debate in the Historiography of the Scientific Revolution.John Nnaji & José Luis Luján - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):99-109.
    The issue of internalism and externalism in historiography of science was intensely debated two decades ago. The conclusions of such debate on the ‘context of science’ appear to be a reinstatement of the positivist view of the ‘content of science’ as comprising only ideas and concepts uninfluenced by extra-scientific factors. The description of the roles of politics, economy, and socio-cultural factors in science was limited only within the ‘context of science’. This article seeks to resituate the ‘content of science’ debate (...)
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  • Drake on Galileo.Maurice A. Finocchiaro - 2002 - Annals of Science 59 (1):83-88.
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  • Medieval Representations of Change and Their Early Modern Application.Matthias Schemmel - 2014 - Foundations of Science 19 (1):11-34.
    The article investigates the role of symbolic means of knowledge representation in concept development using the historical example of medieval diagrams of change employed in early modern work on the motion of fall. The parallel cases of Galileo Galilei, Thomas Harriot, and René Descartes and Isaac Beeckman are discussed. It is argued that the similarities concerning the achievements as well as the shortcomings of their respective work on the motion of fall can to a large extent be attributed to their (...)
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  • Duhem and Koyré on Domingo de Soto.William Wallace - 1990 - Synthese 83 (2):239 - 260.
    Galileo's view of science is indebted to the teaching of the Jesuit professors at the Collegio Romano, but Galileo's concept of mathematical physics also corresponds to that of Giovan Battista Benedetti. Lacking documentary evidence that would connect Benedetti directly with the Jesuits, or the Jesuits with Benedetti, I infer a common source: the Spanish connection, that is, Domingo de Soto. I then give indications that the fourteenth-century work at Oxford and Paris on calculationes was transmitted via Spain and Portugal to (...)
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  • Abstraction Via Generic Modeling in Concept Formation in Science.Nancy J. Nersessian - 2005 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 86 (1):117-144.
    Cases where analogy has played a significant role in the formation of a new scientific concept are well-documented. Yet, how is it that genuinely new representations can be constructed from existing representations? It is argued that the process of ‘generic modeling’ enables abstraction of features common to both the domain of the source of the analogy and of the target phenomena. The analysis focuses on James Clerk Maxwell's construction of the electromagnetic field concept. The mathematical representation Maxwell constructed turned out (...)
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  • Review Essay: The Importance of the History of Science for Philosophy in General. [REVIEW]Gary Hatfield - 1996 - Synthese 106 (1):113 - 138.
    Essay review of Daniel Garber, 1992, Descartes' Metaphysical Physics, University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London, xiv + 389 pp., and Michael Friedman,: 1992, Kant and the Exact Sciences, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., and London, xvii + 357 pp. These two books display the historical connection between science and philosophy in the writings of Descartes and Kant. They show the place of science in, or the scientific context of, these authors' central metaphysical doctrines, pertaining to substance and its properties, (...)
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  • Descartes as Critic of Galileo's Scientific Methodology.Roger Ariew - 1986 - Synthese 67 (1):77 - 90.
    Some philosophers of science suggest that philosophical assumptions must influence historical scholarship, because history (like science) has no neutral data and because the treatment of any particular historical episode is going to be influenced to some degree by one's prior philosophical conceptions of what is important in science. However, if the history of science must be laden with philosophical assumptions, then how can the history of science be evidence for the philosophy of science? Would not an inductivist history of science (...)
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  • Conceptual Change in Science and in Science Education.Nancy J. Nersessian - 1989 - Synthese 80 (1):163 - 183.
    There is substantial evidence that traditional instructional methods have not been successful in helping students to restructure their commonsense conceptions and learn the conceptual structures of scientific theories. This paper argues that the nature of the changes and the kinds of reasoning required in a major conceptual restructuring of a representation of a domain are fundamentally the same in the discovery and in the learning processes. Understanding conceptual change as it occurs in science and in learning science will require the (...)
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  • Antirationalistische Erklärungen in der Wissenschaftstheorie.Gisela Loeck - 1983 - Erkenntnis 20 (3):341 - 375.
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  • Galilean Argumentation and the Inauthenticity of the Cigoli Letter on Painting Vs. Sculpture.Maurice A. Finocchiaro - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (4):492-508.
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  • Narrative Constraints on Historical Writing: The Case of the Scientific Revolution.Rivka Feldhay - 1994 - Science in Context 7 (1):7-24.
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  • Tropes and Topics in Scientific Discourse: Galileo's De Motu.Ofer Gal - 1994 - Science in Context 7 (1):25-52.
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  • The Theory‐Ladenness of Observations, the Role of Scientific Instruments, and the Kantiana Priori.Ragnar Fjelland - 1991 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 5 (3):269 – 280.
    Abstract During the last decades it has become widely accepted that scientific observations are ?theory?laden?. Scientists ?see? the world with their theories or theoretical presuppositions. In the present paper it is argued that they ?see? with their scientific instruments as well, as the uses of scientific instruments is an important characteristic of modern natural science. It is further argued that Euclidean geometry is intimately linked to technology, and hence that it plays a fundamental part in the construction and operation of (...)
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  • Kuhn and Philosophy.Michael Friedman - 2012 - Modern Intellectual History 9 (1):77-88.
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  • Galileo, Viviani and the Tower of Pisa.Michael Segre - 1989 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 20 (4):435-451.
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  • Honoré Fabri and the Trojan Horse of Inertia.Michael Elazar - 2008 - Science in Context 21 (1):1-38.
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  • Epicurean and Galilean Motion in Gassendi's Physics.Antonia LoLordo - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (2):301–314.
    This is about the tension between Epicurean and Galilean accounts of motion in Gassendi. For my more recent thoughts on this, see http://philpapers.org/rec/LOLCEG.
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  • The Tower Experiment and the Copernican Revolution.Gunnar Andersson - 1991 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 5 (2):143 – 152.
    Abstract During the Copernican revolution the supporters of the Ptolemaic theory argued that the tower experiment refuted the Copernican hypothesis of the (diurnal) motion of the earth, but was in agreement with the Ptolemaic theory. In his defence of the Copernican theory Galileo argued that the experiment was in agreement both with Copernican and Ptolemaic theory. The reason for these different views of the same experiment was not that the two theories were incommensurable, as Paul Feyerabend argues, but that Galileo (...)
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  • Book Review. [REVIEW]A. van Helden - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 38 (4):986-989.
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  • From Paradigms to Figures of Thought.Denise Najmanovich - 2002 - Emergence: Complexity and Organization 4 (1):85-93.
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  • Abstraction Via Generic Modeling in Concept Formation in Science.Nancy J. Nersessian - 2002 - Mind and Society 3 (1):129-154.
    Cases where analogy has played a significant role in the formation of a new scientific concept are well-documented. Yet, how is it that genuinely new representations can be constructed from existing representations? It is argued that the process of ‘generic modeling’ enables abstraction of features common to both the domain of the source of the analogy and of the target phenomena. The analysis focuses on James Clerk Maxwell's construction of the electromagnetic field concept. The mathematical representation Maxwell constructed turned out (...)
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