Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Emoțiile și inteligența emoțională în organizații.Nicolae Sfetcu - 2020 - Drobeta Turnu Severin: MultiMedia Publishing.
    O argumentare a importanței dualiste a emoțiilor în societate, individual și la nivel de comunitate. Tendința actuală de conștientizare și control al emoțiilor prin inteligența emoțională are un efect benefic în afaceri și pentru succesul activităților sociale dar, dacă nu suntem atenți, poate duce la o alienare ireversibilă la nivel individual și social. Lucrarea se compune din trei părți principale: Emoții (Modele ale emoțiilor, Procesarea emoțiilor, Fericirea, Filosofia emoțiilor, Etica emotiilor), Inteligența emoțională (Modele ale inteligenței emoționale, Inteligența emoțională în cercetare (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Enacting Musical Emotions. Sense-Making, Dynamic Systems, and the Embodied Mind.Andrea Schiavio, Dylan van der Schyff, Julian Cespedes-Guevara & Mark Reybrouck - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (5):785-809.
    The subject of musical emotions has emerged only recently as a major area of research. While much work in this area offers fascinating insights to musicological research, assumptions about the nature of emotional experience seem to remain committed to appraisal, representations, and a rule-based or information-processing model of cognition. Over the past three decades alternative ‘embodied’ and ‘enactive’ models of mind have challenged this approach by emphasising the self-organising aspects of cognition, often describing it as an ongoing process of dynamic (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Emotions Emerge From More Basic Psychological Ingredients: A Modern Psychological Constructionist Model.Kristen A. Lindquist - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (4):356-368.
    Over a century ago, William James outlined the first psychological constructionist model of emotion, arguing that emotions are phenomena constructed of more basic psychological parts. In this article, I outline a modern psychological constructionist model of emotion. I first explore the history of psychological construction to demonstrate that psychological constructionist models have historically emerged in an attempt to explain variability in emotion that cannot be accounted for by other approaches. I next discuss the modern psychological constructionist model of emotion that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Author Reply: Appraisal is Transactional, Not All-Inclusive, and Cognitive in a Broad Sense.Agnes Moors - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):185-186.
    I reply to the comments of Parkinson (2013), and de Sousa (2013), discussing the transactional nature of appraisal, the presumably overinclusive definition of appraisal, and the cognitive nature of appraisal.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Author Reply: On the Frontiers of Appraisal Theory.Ira J. Roseman - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):187-188.
    The special section commentators take us to the frontiers of appraisal theory. Following their lead, I discuss cross-cultural commonalities, domain-specific appraisals, individual differences, nonappraisal determinants, and a blueprint for the appraising brain.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Appraisal Theories of Emotion: State of the Art and Future Development.Agnes Moors, Phoebe C. Ellsworth, Klaus R. Scherer & Nico H. Frijda - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):119-124.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   78 citations  
  • Comment: Journeys to the Center of Emotion.Brian Parkinson - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):180-184.
    Does appraisal co-ordinate emotional responses? Are emotions usually reached via mental representations of relational meaning? This comment considers alternative causal routes in order to assess the centrality of appraisal in the explanation of emotion. Implicit and explicit meaning extraction can certainly help steer the course of emotion-related processes. However, presupposing that appraisals represent the driving force behind all aspects of emotion generation leads to inclusive formulations of appraisal or restrictive formulations of emotion.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Comment: The Appraising Brain: Towards a Neuro-Cognitive Model of Appraisal Processes in Emotion.Tobias Brosch & David Sander - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):163-168.
    Appraisal theories have described elaborate mechanisms underlying the elicitation of emotion at the psychological-cognitive level, but typically do not integrate neuroscientific concepts and findings. At the same time, theoretical developments in appraisal theory have been pretty much ignored by researchers studying the neuroscience of emotion. We feel that a stronger integration of these two literatures would be highly profitable for both sides. Here we outline a blueprint of the “appraising brain.” To this end, we review neuroimaging research investigating the processing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Comment: Language and Dimensionality in Appraisal Theory.Ronald de Sousa - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):171-175.
    The proliferation of dimensions of appraisal is both welcome and worrying. The preoccupation with sorting out causes may be somewhat otiose. And the ubiquity of emotions in levels of processing raises intriguing problems about the role of language in identifying and triggering emotions and appraisals.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Appraisal Theory: Old and New Questions.Phoebe C. Ellsworth - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):125-131.
    I describe my current thinking on two old questions—the causal role of appraisals and the relationship of appraisal theories to basic emotions theories and constructivist theories, and three (sort of) new questions—the completeness of appraisals, the role of language, and the development of automaticity in emotional responses.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • Comment: Appraisal Affords Flexibility to Emotion in More Ways Than One.Peter Kuppens - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):176-179.
    The appraisal theory formulations posited in this special section consider the appraisal process to afford flexibility to emotional responding by the malleability of how people appraise events. I argue that not only the way in which events are appraised but also the way in which appraisals drive changes in other emotion components is characterized by flexibility across persons and context. Accounting for such flexibility is crucial for the further development of appraisal theories and their application to other domains.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Current Emotion Research in Social Psychology: Thinking About Emotions and Other People.Brian Parkinson & Antony S. R. Manstead - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (4):371-380.
    This article discusses contemporary social psychological approaches to the social relations and appraisals associated with specific emotions; other people’s impact on appraisal processes; effects of emotion on other people; and interpersonal emotion regulation. We argue that single-minded cognitive perspectives restrict our understanding of interpersonal and group-related emotional processes, and that new methodologies addressing real-time interpersonal and group processes present promising opportunities for future progress.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Flavors of Appraisal Theories of Emotion.Agnes Moors - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (4):303-307.
    Appraisal theories of emotion have two fundamental assumptions: that there are regularities to be discovered between situations and components of emotional episodes, and that the influence of these situations on these components is causally mediated by a mental process called appraisal. Appraisal theories come in different flavors, proposing different to-be-explained phenomena and different underlying mechanisms for the influence of appraisal on the other components.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • The Emotions Behind Character Friendship: From Other‐Oriented Emotions to the ‘Bonding Feeling’.Consuelo Martínez-Priego & Ana Romero-Iribas - forthcoming - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Emotion: Animal and Reflective.Hichem Naar - 2019 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 57 (4):561-588.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Emotion Meets Action: Towards an Integration of Research and Theory.Bernhard Hommel, Agnes Moors, David Sander & Julien Deonna - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (4):295-298.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Varieties of Cognition-Arousal Theory.Rainer Reisenzein - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (1):17-26.
    Three main versions of cognition-arousal theory are distinguished depending on how they interpret the theory’s basic postulate, that an emotion is a function of cognition and arousal: objectivist causal theories, attributional theories, and fusion theories. The objectivist causal and attributional theories each comprise a causal-functional and a part-whole version, and the fusion theory subsumes in particular a categorization and a perceptual integration version. In addition, the attributional version of cognition-arousal theory can be reinterpreted as a theory of emotion self-ascription. Although (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Appraisals, Emotions, and Inherited Intentional Objects.Daniel Shargel - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (1):46-54.
    Modern appraisal theories inherited a problem from the Schachter theory: are emotions directed at intentional objects, and if so, why? On both theories the emotion is initiated by some sort of cognitive state, which according to Schachter produces a state of arousal, and according to appraisal theorists a cluster of emotion-specific states. If cognitions are components of the emotional state it may seem like we can explain why emotions inherit objects from those cognitions. In this article I focus on appraisal (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Implicit Affect and Autonomous Nervous System Reactions: A Review of Research Using the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test. [REVIEW]Anna-Sophie Weil, Gina Patricia Hernández, Thomas Suslow & Markus Quirin - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Role of Emotional Appraisal in Episodic Memory in a Sample of Argentinean Preschoolers.Eliana Ruetti, María Soledad Segretin, Verónica Adriana Ramírez & Sebastian J. Lipina - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Emotion.Ronald de Sousa - 2007 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   71 citations  
  • Better Together: A Unified Perspective on Appraisal and Emotion Regulation.Jennifer Yih, Andero Uusberg, Jamie L. Taxer & James J. Gross - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (1):41-47.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Cognition and Emotion: On Paradigms and Metaphors.Dirk Wentura - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (1):85-93.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Do Emotions Represent Values?Laura Schroeter, François Schroeter & Karen Jones - 2015 - Dialectica 69 (3):357-380.
    This paper articulates what it would take to defend representationalism in the case of emotions – i.e. the claim that emotions attribute evaluative properties to target objects or events. We argue that representationalism faces a significant explanatory challenge that has not yet been adequately recognized. Proponents must establish that a representation relation linking emotions and value is explanatorily necessary. We use the case of perception to bring out the difficulties in meeting this explanatory challenge.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Alternatives to the Fixed-Set Model: A Review of Appraisal Models of Emotion. [REVIEW]Julian W. Fernando, Yoshihisa Kashima & Simon M. Laham - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (1):19-32.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Responding to Emotional Scenes: Effects of Response Outcome and Picture Repetition on Reaction Times and the Late Positive Potential.Nina N. Thigpen, Andreas Keil & Alexandra M. Freund - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):1-13.
    Processing the motivational relevance of a visual scene and reacting accordingly is crucial for survival. Previous work suggests the emotional content of naturalistic scenes affects response speed, such that unpleasant content slows responses whereas pleasant content accelerates responses. It is unclear whether these effects reflect motor-cognitive processes, such as attentional orienting, or vary with the function/outcome of the motor response itself. Four experiments manipulated participants’ ability to terminate the picture and, thereby, the response’s function and motivational value. Attentive orienting was (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Emotion.R. De Sousa - 2003 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 3.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations