Results for 'Chuang-Tzu'

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  1. On Chuang Tzu as a Deconstructionist with a Difference.Robert E. Allinson - 2003 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (3-4):487-500.
    The common understanding of Chuang-Tzu as one of the earliest deconstructionists is only half true. This article sets out to challenge conventional characterizations of Chuang-Tzu by adding the important caveat that not only is he a philosophical deconstructionist but that his writings also reveal a non-relativistic, transcendental basis to understanding. The road to such understanding, as argued by this author, can be found in Chuang-Tzu’s emphasis on the illusory or dream-like nature of the self and, by extension, (...)
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  2. Wittgenstein, Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu: The Art of Circumlocution.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2007 - Asian Philosophy 17 (1):97 – 108.
    Where Western philosophy ends, with the limits of language, marks the beginning of Eastern philosophy. The Tao de jing of Laozi begins with the limitations of language and then proceeds from that as a starting point. On the other hand, the limitation of language marks the end of Wittgenstein's cogitations. In contrast to Wittgenstein, who thought that one should remain silent about that which cannot be put into words, the message of the Zhuangzi is that one can speak about that (...)
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  3. I and Tao: Martin Buber's Encounter with Chuang Tzu.Robert E. Allinson & Jonathan R. Herman - 1998 - Philosophy East and West 48 (3):529.
    This review confirms Herman’s work as a praiseworthy contribution to East-West and comparative philosophical literature. Due credit is given to Herman for providing English readers with access to Buber’s commentary on, a personal translation of, the Chuang-Tzu; Herman’s insight into the later influence of I and Thou on Buber’s understanding of Chuang-Tzu and Taoism is also appropriately commended. In latter half of this review, constructive criticisms of Herman’s work are put forward, such as formatting inconsistencies, a tendency toward (...)
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  4. On the Question of Relativism in the Chuang-Tzu.Robert E. Allinson - 1989 - Philosophy East and West 39 (1):13-26.
    This article offers a meta-analysis of contemporary approaches aimed at resolving the internal, relativistic-non-relativistic tension within the text of the Chuang-Tzu. In the first section, the four most commonly applied approaches are unpacked and evaluated, ranging from relativistic approaches such as hard relativism and soft relativism, to approaches that acknowledge both relativism and non-relativism, as well as others which acknowledge neither of the two perspectives (relativism and non-relativism). After demonstrating the immanent difficulties these four types of approaches encounter, the (...)
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  5. Study on Logic Reasoning and Ideological Characteristic of “Equivalence of Life and Death” of Chuang-Tzu. Di Wu - 2017 - Theory Horizon 526 (6):46-51.
    The Concept of Life and Death of Chuang-tzu have inherited and developed Confucianism and Taoism thoughts, establishing Ontological foundation of "Life - Body", distinguishing the transcendental concept of "Dead Heart" and the empirical concept of "Death Body", as well as proposing the thought of "Equivalence of Life and Death" finally. The logic Reasoning of Chuang-tzu "Equivalence of Life and Death", start from constructing the equal status of "Life" and “Death" from ontological argument. Life and Death then are reduced (...)
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  6. Perspectivism Narrow and Wide: An Examination of Nietzsche's Limited Perspectivism From a Daoist Lens.Casey Rentmeester - 2013 - Kritike 7 (1):1-21.
    Western liberal intellectuals often find themselves in a precarious situation with regard to whether or not they should celebrate and endorse Friedrich Nietzsche as a philosopher who we should all unequivocally embrace into our Western philosophical canon. While his critique of the Western philosophical tradition and his own creative insights are unprecedented and immensely important, his blatant inegalitarianism and remarks against women are often too difficult to stomach. This paper attempts to introduce Western philosophers to Chuang Tzu, a Chinese (...)
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  7. Competing Interpretations of the Inner Chapters of the "Zhuangzi".W. Van Norden Bryan - 1996 - Philosophy East and West 46 (2):247-268.
    In the Inner Chapters, arguments for a variety of different philosophical positions are present, including skepticism, relativism, particularism, and objectivism. Given that these are not all mutually consistent, we are left with the problem of reconciling the tensions among them. The various positions are described and passages from the Inner Chapters are presented illustrating each. A detailed commentary is offered on the opening of the Inner Chapters, arguing that it is best understood in an objectivist fashion. An interpretation is presented (...)
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  8. Commentary on the Lao Tzu by Wang Pi.David Hall - 1981 - Philosophy East and West 31 (1):97-98.
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  9.  68
    Hansen on Hsün-Tzu.Bryan Van Norden & Bryan Van Norden - 1993 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 20 (3):365-382.
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  10. Fictionalism, Realism, Empiricism on Scientific Models.Chuang Liu - 2014
    This paper defends an approach to modeling and models in science that is against model fictionalism of a recent stripe (the “new fictionalism” that takes models to be abstract entities that are analogous to works of fiction). It further argues that there is a version of fictionalism on models to which my approach is neutral and which only makes sense if one adopts a special sort of antirealism (e.g. constructive empiricism). Otherwise, my approach strongly suggests that one stays away from (...)
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  11. Symbols Versus Models.Chuang Liu - 2013
    In this paper I argue against a deflationist view that as representational vehicles symbols and models do their jobs in essentially the same way. I argue that symbols are conventional vehicles whose chief function is denotation while models are epistemic vehicles whose chief function is showing what their targets are like in the relevant aspects. It is further pointed out that models usually do not rely on similarity or some such relations to relate to their targets. For that referential relation (...)
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  12. The Debate Between Mencius and Hsün-Tzu: Contemporary Applications.Robert E. Allinson - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (1):31-49.
    This article takes one of the richest historical debates, that of Hsun-Tzu and Mencius, as the contextual starting-point for the elaboration of human goodness. In support of Mencius, this article develops additional metaphysical and bio-social-evolutionary grounds, both of which parallel each other. The metaphysical analysis suggests that, in the spirit of Spinoza, an entity’s nature must necessarily include the drive toward its preservation. Likewise, the multi-faceted bio-social-evolutionary argument locates the fundamental telos of humanity in the preservation of social ties and (...)
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  13.  81
    Three Models of Self-Integration (Tzu Te) in Early China.James D. Sellmann - 1987 - Philosophy East and West 37 (4):372-391.
    This paper examines Confucian, Daoist and Legalist view of self-realization zide 自得.
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  14. Google and Facebook Vs Rawls and Lao-Tzu: How Silicon Valley’s Utilitarianism and Confucianism Are Bad for Internet Ethics.Morten Bay - 2020 - AoIR 2020: The 21th Annual Conference of the Association of Internet Researchers.
    The proposed paper presents an argument in favor of a Rawlsian approach to ethics for Internet technology companies (den Hoven & Rooksby, 2008; Hoffman, 2017). Ethics statements from such companies are analyzed and shown to be utilitarian and teleological in nature, and therefore in opposition to Rawls’ theories of justice and fairness. The statements are also shown to have traits in common with Confucian virtue ethics (Ames, 2011; Nylan, 2008).
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  15. Alchemy, Medicine, Religion in the China of A.D. 320: The Nei Pʻien of Ko Hung (Pao-Pʻu Tzu).Hong Ge - 1966 - Cambridge: Mass., M.I.T. Press.
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    An Open Letter to the APA.Bryan W. Van Norden - 1996 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 70 (2):161-163.
    I am writing because I am disturbed by the apparent policy of many mainstream philosophy journals toward Chinese and comparative philosophy. The assumption seems to be that such work should be confined to the handful of specialist journals. I believe that this is an antiquated and counterproductive policy. Philosophers have recognized for a long time that any well-educated ethicist needs to know something about Aristotle, Kant, and the secondary work published on them. Because of changes in our society and in (...)
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  17. Human Survival: Evolution, Religion and the Irrational.Milton H. Saier & Jack T. Trevors - 2010 - Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 3 (1):17-20.
    Is there a possible biological explanation for religion? That is, is there a genetic basis for believing in mystical, supernatural beings when there is no scientifi c evidence for their existence? Can we explain why some people prefer to accept myth over science? Why do so many people still accept creation and refuse to embrace evolution? Is there an evolutionary basis for religious beliefs? It is certainly true that religions have been part of human civilization throughout most of its recent (...)
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  18.  34
    Two Types of Fish: Confucianism and Taoism.Britton Watson - manuscript
    I briefly compare and contrast the philosophy of Confucius as written in the I Ching and Lao Tzu's philosophy presented in the Tao Te Ching.
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