Results for 'End of Art'

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  1.  7
    The End Of Art Revisited: A Response To Kalle Puolakka.Hans Maes - 2005 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 2 (3).
    InThe End of Art: A Real Problem or Not Really a Problem?’ I raised some questions about Arthur Dantos famousend of artthesis. A (...)largely polemical paper, it was intended as an invitation to further discussion, and Kalle Puolakka has now taken up this invitation inPlaying The Game After The End of Art’. I thank him for his many insightful remarks. Critical comments are typically more interesting and helpful than simple praise, and Puolakkas comments are no exception. I would therefore like to return the favour. I will place Puolakkas remarks under critical examination and in the process hope to rephrase, refine, and defend some of my original claims. First, however, I will briefly restate my reading of Dantos ideas on the end of art. (shrink)
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  2. "And Why Not?" Hegel, Comedy, and the End of Art.Lydia L. Moland - 2016 - Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane (1-2):73-104.
    Towards the very end of his wide-ranging lectures on the philosophy of art, Hegel unexpectedly expresses a preference for comedy over tragedy. More surprisingly, given his (...)systematic claims for his aesthetic theory, he suggests that this preference is arbitrary. This essay suggests that this arbitrariness is itself systematic, given Hegels broader claims about unity and necessity in art generally and his analysis of ancient as opposed to modern drama in particular. With the emergence of modern subjectivity, tragic plots lose their necessity and so their redemptive conclusions; comic plots disintegrate into mockery and entertainment. In many cases, the dramas in question consequently fail to be art. This does not, however, mean that art ends: insofar as it inspires humans to a better understanding of their unity with the divine, it will continue to meet its mandate. But the lack of necessity in modern drama means we are free to prefer happy endings. Hegels seemingly arbitrary preference is, in the end, systematically justified. (shrink)
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  3. The End of Art: Hegels Appropriation of Artistotles Nous.Stephen Snyder - 2006 - Modern Schoolman 83 (4):301-316.
    This article investigates a tension that arises in Hegels aesthetic theory between theoretical and practical forms of reason. This tension, I argue, stems from Hegels appropriation (...) of an Aristotelian framework for a historically unfolding social teleology which puts practical reason to work for the aims of theoretical reason. Recognizing that this aspect of Hegels dialectic is essential in overcoming problems left in Kants transcendental idealism, the appearance of incongruence does not lessen. Grouped together with absolute spirit, Hegel positions art as a transitory mode of mind, a vehicle, which aims to raise spirit to the higher cognition of philosophy. When the unfolding absolute concept becomes too complex for articulation in the material, art must end, as spirits message can be expressed only through the non-material form of philosophy. This study focuses on the ambivalence found in Hegels writings regarding his account of historical completion. Though Hegel sees in the Absolute a metaphysical solution to the unity of subject and object, the practical aspects of the unity appear to falter when philosophy becomes the dominant mode of expression at the close of a historical cycle. In Lectures on the History of Philosophy, Hegel links his notion of the Absolute, albeit with modification, to Aristotles nous. As described in De Anima, this entails a progression in which active and possible intellect rise to the level of the eternal, while passive intellect, the imaginative element, passes on with the body. Because the architecture of Aristotles nous, which is not in line with his defense of poetry, is integrated into the blueprint of Hegels absolute, an unresolved tension emerges in the spirit of art. A divergence of aims is forced to the surface through Hegels application of a template for achievement of theoretical knowledge, with an end in the universal, to a form of practical knowing which has an end in the particular. (shrink)
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  4.  98
    THE END OF ART AND PATOČKAS PHILOSOPHY OF ART.Josl Jan - 2016 - HORIZON. Studies in Phenomenology 1 (1):232-246.
    In this essay I consider the end-of-art thesis in its metaphysical and empirical versions. I show that both use the correspondence theory of truth as the (...) basis for their conception of the history of art. As a counterpart to these theories I have chosen Patočkas conception of the history of art. His theory is based also on the relationship between art and truth, but he conceives truth in the phenomenological sense of manifestation. In the rest of the essay I seek to show the consequences Patočkas conception has for the history of art. In the rst part, I set out to show Patockas critique of Hegels aesthetics as a system based on the correspondence theory of truth. In particular, I endeavour to explain his critique of some intrinsic problems of Hegels aesthetics, the general failure of Hegels system to achieve its goal, and, lastly, Hegels giving up on the meaning of the art in the present. I also seek to show that Dantos version runs into the same problems and conclusions as Hegels. In the second part I discuss Patočkas analysis of modern art and the aesthetic attitude, where he nds a hidden a nity between art and aletheia, which Hegel overlooked. e last part of the essay focuses on the consequences that the conception of the truth of art as aletheia have for the history of art. I conclude that art in such a conception represents an independent eld of the manifestation of being in history beside philosophy. Moreover, modern and contemporary art do not mean the end of art; rather, they have their place in art history based on aletheia, since they are more focused on the manifestation itself than on what is manifested. Unlike Hegel and Danto, therefore, Patočka retains the historical meaning of modern and contemporary art. His conception of the history of art, summed up under the idea of aletheia, has greater explanatory potential than Hegels and Dantos conceptions, and it retains the historical meaning of modern and contemporary art. (shrink)
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  5.  6
    Individual Style After The End Of Art.Regina Wenninger - 2005 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 2 (3):105-115.
    In The Transfiguration of the Commonplace (1981)1 Arthur Danto construes individual style as somethinggiventhat belongs to the artistessentiallyandinseparably.” By contrast, his (...)theory of the end of art, set forth in After the End of Art (1997) and elsewhere,2 suggests the liberation of artists from any stylistic commitments. How do these two theories go together? Can there be individual styles after the end of art? Examining the compatibility between Dantos end of art thesis and his essentialist conception of individual style, this paper tries to approach an answer to these questions. (shrink)
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  6.  14
    Playing The Game After The End Of Art: Comments For Hans Maes.Kalle Puolakka - 2005 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 2 (1):12-19.
    In his philosophy of art history, Arthur C. Danto claims that in the 1960 ́s the master narrative of art had come to an end, and that (...)
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  7.  13
    The End Of Art: A Real Problem Or Not Really A Problem?Hans Maes - 2004 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 1 (2):59-68.
    In 1984, Arthur Danto wrote an article with the telling titleThe End of Art.’ Just a few years earlier, Richard Rorty had declared the end of (...)
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  8.  69
    Hegel and Semiotics: Beyond the End of Art.William D. Melaney - 2016 - In K. Bankov (ed.), New Semiotics: Between Tradition and Innovation Proceedings of the Twelfth World Congress of Semiotics. New Bulgarian University. pp. 10 pages.
    This paper argues that Hegel attempts to appropriate the irreversible aspects of Romantic aesthetics in four ways: (i) Hegel radicalizes Kantian aesthetics on the basis of a (...)
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  9.  18
    Impressions Of Reflection And The End Of Art: A Re-Evaluation Of Humes Standard Of Taste.Gary Jaeger - 2004 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 1 (1):25-31.
    In his 'Of the Standard of Taste' David Hume seems to make the paradoxical claim that even though the sentiments an agent feels in response to an (...)
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  10. The End of the World After the End of Finitude: On a Recently Prominent Speculative Tone in Philosophy.Jussi Backman - 2017 - In Marcia Cavalcante Schuback & Susanna Lindberg (eds.), The End of the World: Contemporary Philosophy and Art. London: Rowman and Littlefield International. pp. 105-123.
    The chapter studies the speculative realist critique of the notion of finitude and its implications for the theme of the "end of the world" as a (...) teleological and eschatological idea. It is first explained how Quentin Meillassoux proposes to overcome both Kantian and Heideggerian "correlationist" approaches with his speculative thesis of absolute contingency. It is then shown that Meillassoux's speculative materialism also dismantles the close link forged by Kant between the teleological ends of human existence and a teleological notion of the "end of the world." Speculative materialism no longer sees the end of thought, or the end of the thinking human being, as an insurmountable limit of conceivability, but rather as one contingent and possible event among others. This allows us to conceive an "end of all things" in a positive sense with regard to which the old eschatological hope for the end of the present world of injustice and for the emergence of a new world of perfect, "divine" justice becomes meaningful and legitimate in an entirely new sense. (shrink)
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  11. Art: A Brief History of Absence.Davor Dzalto - 2015 - Filozofija I Društvo 26 (3):652-676.
    This essay focuses on the logic of the aesthetic argument used in the eighteenth century as a conceptual tool for formulating the modern concept of “(fine) art( (...)s).” The essay also examines the main developments in the history of the art of modernity which were initiated from the way thenatureof art was conceived in early modern aesthetics. The author claims that the formulation of theaesthetic natureof art led to the process of the gradual disappearance of all of the formal elements that had previously characterized the visual arts; the result wasemptinessornothingnessas art. The author refers to this process in terms ofvanishing actsthat allow for the formulation of an aesthetics of absence in connection to twentieth-century art (complementing the Ästhetik der Absenz, formulated in German art theory). The author also briefly addresses the consequences that these processes have for the way contemporary art, and art world operate. (shrink)
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  12.  5
    The End of the Art, the Tedium and Misery of Everyday Life (Guy Debords Work: an Essential Place from the Critical Point of View of our Times).Carvalho Eurico - 2014 - Aufklärung 1 (1):191-202.
    Satisfying the demand of questioning the contemporary condition implies, first of all, a criticism of present times. From this point of view, it becomes clear that art (...)
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  13. Games and the Art of Agency.C. Thi Nguyen - forthcoming - Philosophical Review.
    Games may seem like a waste of time, where we struggle under artificial rules for arbitrary goals. I suggest that the rules and goals of games are (...)
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  14. Alla fine della vita: bioetica e medicina alla ricerca di un confine [At the end of life: bioethics and medicine looking for a boundary].Rosangela Barcaro - 2015 - Laboratorio Dell’ISPF.
    Bioethics, neuroscience, medicine are contributing to a debate on the definition and criteria of death. This topic is very controversial, and it demonstrates clashing views on the (...)
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  15. Intentional Image and Transcendental Image in the Work of Art.Bogdan Nita - 2012 - Image 2 (2321):231.
    The purpose of this paper is to show that images have an ontological support by which they obtain an independent existence from the mind. In accordance with (...)
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  16.  36
    Review of New Feminist Art Criticism by Katy Deepwell[REVIEW]Peg Brand - 1997 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55 (3):344-345.
    Katy Deepwell calls for a vital and visible "new" feminist criticism in 1997 amidst a pessimistic overview of the state of feminist art and criticism in (...) Britain, Canada, and the U.S. As an update to this review, I note that Deepwell took decisive and effective action on her pessimism and for the past twenty years (as of this writing in July 2017) created an online feminist journal--n.paradoxa: international feminist art journal--that has published over 550 articles by 400 writers and artists from more than 80 countries. After 40 issues, the journal has come to an end. What a success story! (shrink)
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  17. Glaring Omissions in Traditional Theories of Art.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - 2003 - In Steven Cahn (ed.), Philosophy for the 21st Century: A Comprehensive Reader. Oxford University Press. pp. 779-813.
    I investigate the role of feminist theorizing in relation to traditionally-based aesthetics. Feminist artworks have arisen within the context of a patriarchal Artworld dominated for thousands (...)of years by male artists, critics, theorists, and philosophers. I look at the history of that context as it impacts philosophical theorizing by pinpointing the narrow range of the paradigms used in definingart.” I test the plausibility of Dantos After the End of Art vision of a post-historical, pluralistic future in whichanything goes,” a future that unfortunately rests upon the same outdated foundation as the conceptart.” This essay was originally published in The Proceedings of the Twentieth Century World Congress of Philosophy (1999) and reprinted in Noel Carroll, ed., Theories of Art Today (The University of Wisconsin Press, 2000). (shrink)
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  18.  45
    Not-I/Thou: The Other Subject of Art and Architecture.Gavin Keeney - 2014 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    Not-I/Thou: The Other Subject of Art and Architecture is a series of essays delineating the gray areas and black zones in present-day cultural production. Part (...)
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  19. Wittgenstein, Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu: The Art of Circumlocution.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2007 - Asian Philosophy 17 (1):97 – 108.
    Where Western philosophy ends, with the limits of language, marks the beginning of Eastern philosophy. The Tao de jing of Laozi begins with the limitations of language (...)
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  20. A Philosophy of Art in Plato's Republic: An Analysis of Collingwood's Proposal.José Juan González - 2010 - Proceeding of the European Society for Aesthetics 2:161-177.
    The status of art in Plato's philosophy has always been a difficult problem. As a matter of fact, he even threw the poets out from his (...)ideal state, a passage that has led some interpreters to assess that Plato did not develop a proper philosophy of art. Nevertheless, R. G. Collingwood, wrote an article titledPlato's Philosophy of Art”. How can it be? What could lead one of the most important aesthetic scholars of the first half of the twentieth century to make this thesis about Plato? To understand Collingwood's position at that time, I will review it in a new light: his own philosophy of art at that moment as it was propounded in Outlines of a Philosophy of Art, a work he published that same year. I will also examine how Collingwood's position changed when he returned to the same subject in 1938, on the publication of The Principles of Art. Finally, I will end this article defending the correctness of Collingwood's earlier interpretation of Plato's position on art. (shrink)
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  21.  87
    Grief and End-of-Life Surrogate Decision Making.Michael Cholbi - 2017 - In John K. Davis (ed.), Ethics at the End of Life: New Issues and Arguments. New York: Routledge. pp. 201-217.
    Because an increasing number of patients have medical conditions that render them incompetent at making their own medical choices, more and more medical choices are now made (...)
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  22.  97
    Lord, Lewis, and the Institutional Theory of Art.Peggy Zeglin Brand - 1982 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 40 (3):309-314.
    In "Convention and Dickie's Institutional Theory" (British Journal of Aesthetics 1980), Catherine Lord maintains the following thesis: (L) If a work of art is defined (...)
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  23. Cognitive Penetration and the Perception of Art (Winner of 2012 Dialectica Essay Prize).Dustin Stokes - 2014 - Dialectica 68 (1):1-34.
    There are good, even if inconclusive, reasons to think that cognitive penetration of perception occurs: that cognitive states like belief causally affect, in a relatively direct way, (...)
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  24. The Pleasure of Art.Mohan Matthen - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (1):6-28.
    This paper presents a new account of aesthetic pleasure, according to which it is a distinct psychological structure marked by a characteristic self-reinforcing motivation. Pleasure figures (...)in the appreciation of an object in two ways: In the short run, when we are in contact with particular artefacts on particular occasions, aesthetic pleasure motivates engagement and keeps it running smoothlyit may do this despite the fact that the object we engagement is aversive in some ways. Over longer periods, it plays a critical role in shaping how we engage with objects to get this kind of pleasure from them. This account is yoked to a broadly functional understanding of art: it is not the nature of the object that makes it art, but the nature of the response that it is designed to elicit. The view does not, however, rest on individual psychology alone, as some other functional accounts do. Crucially, it is argued that shared cultural context is a key determinant of the pleasure we derive from aesthetic artefacts. The pleasure of art is always communal and communicative. (shrink)
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  25. Why is the Amphibian Status of the Human Unavoidable? Some Remarks on Robert Pippin's "After the Beautiful".Italo Testa - 2015 - Lebenswelt: Aesthetics and Philosophy of Experience 7:21-27.
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  26. Toward an Epistemology of Art.Arnold Cusmariu - 2016 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 3 (1):37-64.
    An epistemology of art has seemed problematic mainly because of arguments claiming that an essential element of a theory of knowledge, truth, has no place in aesthetic (...)
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  27. On Functioinal Definitions Of Art: A RESPONSE TO ROWE.Graham Oppy - 1993 - British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (1):67-71.
    This paper is a critical assessment of M. W. Rowe's functional definition of art.
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  28.  5
    How Can There Be Works Of Art?Michael Morris - 2008 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 5 (3):1-18.
    Interested in art, we tend to be interested in works of art. We seem to encounter works of art all the time, andsetting aside certain relatively (...)abstruse problems in ontologywe seem to have little difficulty in recognizing them for what they are. That there are works of art seems obvious and unproblematic. Quite so, I think. But reflection on what has to be the case if there are to be works of art shows that some quite demanding conditions have to be met. Some will find those conditions too demanding: if I am right, that means that they should not admit that there are any works of art, and they will have to give some other account of what might be involved when we think we are dealing with a work of art. For myself, I think the conditions are not too demanding: their interest comes in what they show us about the nature of artisticmedia’, and about what is involved in being a great artist. (shrink)
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  29.  43
    Practices of Art.Barry Smith - 1988 - In J. C. Nyíri & Barry Smith (eds.), Practical Knowledge: Outlines of a Theory of Traditions and Skills. London: Croom Helm. pp. 172-209.
    Starting out from the ontology of human work set out by Marx in Das Kapital, the paper seeks to analyse the relations between the artist and his (...)
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  30.  42
    On Davies' Institutional Definition of Art.Graham Oppy - 1991 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 29 (3):371-382.
    This paper is a critique of Stephen Davies' institutional definition of art. I argue that Davies' definition suffers from a range of problems.
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  31. Managing Intentions: The End-of-Life Administration of Analgesics and Sedatives, and the Possibility of Slow Euthanasia.Charles Douglas, Ian Kerridge & Rachel Ankeny - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (7):388-396.
    There has been much debate regarding the 'double-effect' of sedatives and analgesics administered at the end-of-life, and the possibility that health professionals using these drugs (...)
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  32.  9
    Kierkegaard on the Value of Art: An Indirect Method of Communication.Antony Aumann - 2019 - In Patrick Stokes, Eleanor Helms & Adam Buben (eds.), The Kierkegaardian Mind. New York: pp. 166-176.
    Like many 19th c. thinkers, Kierkegaard embraces a cognitivist view of art. He thinks works of art matter because they can teach us in important ways. This (...)
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  33. The Buck Passing Theory of Art.James O. Young - 2016 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 3 (4): 421-433.
    In Beyond Art (2014), Dominic Lopes proposed a new theory of art, the buck passing theory. Rather than attempting to define art in terms of exhibited or (...)
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  34. Solving Wollheim's Dilemma: A Fix for the Institutional Definition of Art.Simon Fokt - 2013 - Metaphilosophy 44 (5):640-654.
    Richard Wollheim threatened George Dickie's institutional definition of art with a dilemma which entailed that the theory is either redundant or incomprehensible and useless. This article (...)modifies the definition to avoid such criticism. First, it shows that the definition's concept of the artworld is not vague when understood as a conventional system of beliefs and practices. Then, based on Gaut's cluster theory, it provides an account of reasons artworld members have to confer the status of a candidate for appreciation. An authorised member of an artworld has a good reason to confer the status on an object if it satisfies a subset of criteria respected as sufficient within this artworld. The first horn of the dilemma is averted because explaining the reasons behind conferral cannot eliminate references to the institution, and the second loses its sharpness, as accepting partial arbitrariness of the conferral does not deprive the theory of its explanatory power. (shrink)
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  35. A Proposal for a Dualistic Ontology of Art.Simon Fokt - 2013 - Sztuka I Filozofia (42):29-47.
    While pluralism in ontology of art improves on various monistic views, through its eclectic approach it lost a lot of their simplicity, parsimony, unity and intuitiveness. The (...)
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  36. Circulation and Constitution at the End of History.David Kolb - 1991 - Noûs 25 (2):204.
    What goes round at the end of history for the two Germans.
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  37. The Aesthetics of Theory Selection and the Logics of Art.Ian O’Loughlin & Kate McCallum - 2018 - Philosophy of Science (2):325-343.
    Philosophers of science discuss whether theory selection depends on aesthetic judgments or criteria, and whether these putatively aesthetic features are genuinely extra-epistemic. As examples, judgments involving (...)criteria such as simplicity and symmetry are often cited. However, other theory selection criteria, such as fecundity, coherence, internal consistency, and fertility, more closely match those criteria used in art contexts and by scholars working in aesthetics. Paying closer attention to the way these criteria are used in art contexts allows us to understand some evaluative and developmental practices in scientific theory selection as genuinely aesthetic, enlarging the scope of the goals of science. (shrink)
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  38. This Is Art: A Defence of R. G. Collingwood's Philosophy of Art.James Camien McGuiggan - 2017 - Dissertation, University of Southampton
    R. G. Collingwoods 'The Principles of Art' argues that art is the expression of emotion. This dissertation offers a new interpretation of that philosophy, and argues (...)that this interpretation is both hermeneutically and philosophically plausible. The offered interpretation differs from the received interpretation most significantly in treating the concept ofartas primarily scalarly rather than binarily realisable (this is introduced in ch. 1), and in understanding Collingwoods use of the termemotionmore broadly (introduced in ch. 2). -/- After the exposition of ch. 1, the remainder of that chapter and the subsequent three chapters are each centred around one sort of objection. In ch. 1, I consider the objection that Collingwoods scalar understanding ofartis deviant and unhelpful. I respond by first observing that the understanding is not deviant, and second that it is more philosophically and artistically illuminating. In ch. 2, I consider the objection that Collingwoods understanding ofemotionis so narrow that it fails to do justice to the fact that art can be philosophically potent. I respond that his understanding ofemotionis broad enough that this objection fails. In ch. 3, I consider the objection that Collingwood has no theoretical room for the prima facie plausible thought that some emotions are not worth expressing in art. In response, I reinterpret the points that appear to support this contention in a way that makes them both more plausible and more Collingwoodian. Finally, in ch. 4, I consider the objection that Collingwood does not have the theoretical room to do justice to the value of the delight we take in art. I respond by arguing that although he does not have this room to say that this delight is itself an artistic value, it does yet have an important place in his philosophy. (shrink)
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  39.  49
    Near-Death, End-of-Life Experiences and Quantum Physics.Contzen Pereira, J. Shashi Kiran Reddy ... & Janice Harter - 2017 - Germany:
    This book is a compilation of the work published by the present authors in various scientific journals mainly focused on understanding how quantum physics could decipher the (...)
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  40. Mirrors of the Soul and Mirrors of the Brain? The Expression of Emotions as the Subject of Art and Science.Machiel Keestra - 2014 - In Gary Schwartz (ed.), Emotions. Pain and pleasure in Dutch painting of the Golden Age. nai010 publishers. pp. 81-92.
    Is it not surprising that we look with so much pleasure and emotion at works of art that were made thousands of years ago? Works depicting people (...)
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  41. Joseph Margolis, What, After All, Is a Work of Art? Reviewed by.John Dilworth - 2000 - Philosophy in Review 20 (2):129-131.
    This book is the outcome of a series of lectures on art-related topics which Margolis gave in various places, including Finland, Russia, Japan and the USA, (...)from 1995 through 1997. Mainly these lectures vividly distill views which Margolis has developed more fully elsewhere. Also, as his readers know, Margolis has an unusually allencompassing and closely integrated series of views on almost all of the main issues concerning both art and philosophy generally. Thus the task of a reviewer of this book is the difficult one of somehow coming to terms and finding something useful to say (in a brief compass) on the full sweep of Margolis's philosophy as encapsulated by these lectures. (shrink)
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  42. an End of All Things: a Hundred and Eighteen Verses.Paul Bali - unknown
    verses and aphorisms from a 2014 art show.
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  43. Playing with Fire: Art and the Seductive Power of Pain.Iskra Fileva - 2013 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotions in Art. Palgrave Macmillan.
    I discuss the aesthetic power of painful art. I focus on artworks that occasion pain byhitting too close to home,” i.e., by presenting narratives meant (...)to beabout us.” I consider various reasons why such works may have aesthetic value for us, but I argue that the main reason has to do with the power of such works to transgress conversational boundaries. The discussion is meant as a contribution to the debate on the paradox of tragedy. (shrink)
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  44. Definitions of Art, by Stephen Davies[REVIEW]Peg Brand - 1994 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (2):492-494.
    Davies presents the reader with a sterling review of the literature on the definition of "art" and a stimulating discussion of the role of conventions in (...) the making and appreciating of contemporary art. Definitions of Art is essential reading for anyone interested in the history of aesthetics and as it informs the current dialectic on art. (shrink)
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  45.  88
    The Ancient Quarrel Between Art and Philosophy in Contemporary Exhibitions of Visual Art.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2019 - Curator: The Museum Journal 62 (1):7-17.
    At a time when professional art criticism is on the wane, the ancient quarrel between art and philosophy demands fresh answers. Professional art criticism provided a basis (...)
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  46.  37
    Semantic Interoperability in Healthcare. State of the Art in the US. A Position Paper with Background Materials.Werner Ceusters & Barry Smith - 2010 - In European Union ARGOS Project: Transatlantic Observatory for Meeting Global Health Policy Challenges through ICT-Enabled Solution.
    Semantic interoperability can be defined as the ability of two or more computer systems to exchange information in such a way that the meaning of that information (...)
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  47.  23
    Dispensing with the Generic Sense of" Art'.Raymond Kolcaba - 1989 - Southwest Philosophical Studies 11.
    The question of whether the termart,” or art as an array of objects, can be defined depends upon the sense ofartand its extension. The (...)
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  48. Play, Skill, and the Origins of Perceptual Art.Mohan Matthen - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (2):173-197.
    Art is universal across cultures. Yet, it is biologically expensive because of the energy expended and reduced vigilance. Why do humans make and contemplate it? This paper (...)
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  49. Art, Sexual Selection, Group Selection (Critical Notice of Denis Dutton, The Art Instinct).Mohan Matthen - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):337-356.
    The capacity to engage with art is a human universal present in all cultures and just about every individual human. This indicates that this capacity is evolved. (...)
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    End-of-Life Experience Case Study and a Proposed Quantum Physics Hypothesis.Contzen Pereira & J. Shashi Kiran Reddy ... - 2017 - Journal of Near Death Studies 35 (1):57 - 61.
    This case study is a retrospection of my familys experiences that highlight several ELE facets. Following a description, we attempt to explain some of these phenomena (...)from the perspectives of science and other germane disciplines. (shrink)
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