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  1. Religião e política no pensamento de Maquiavel.J. L. Ames - 2006 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 47 (113):51-72.
    For Machiavelli, religion is valued not by the importance of its founder, the content of its teachings, the truth of its dogmas or the significance of its rites. It is not the essence of what really matters but its function and importance for collective life. Religion teaches to recognize and respect political rules through the religious commandments. This collective norm could assume the outer coercive aspect of the military discipline as well as the inner persuasive character of civic and moral (...)
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  2. ESTADO E GOVERNO NO PENSAMENTO DE MARSÍLIO DE PÁDUA: RAÍZES MEDIEVAIS DE UMA TEORIA MODERNA.J. L. Ames - 2003 - Ética and Filosofia Política 6 (2):0-0.
    This study brings light to the concepts of State and Government in the thought of Marsilio de Padua pointing out to profoundly modern institutions present in the reflection of this medieval philosopher. We attempt to show that Marsilio de Padua reflects based on Aristotle´s categories, but proposes a State and Government conception different from that common place of medieval politics as he insists on the need of the popular consent as a criterion of political legitimacy. -/- O estudo explicita os (...)
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  3. Law and violence or legitimizing politics in Machiavelli.J. L. Ames - 2011 - Trans/Form/Ação 34 (1):21-42.
    One of the Machiavelli's most famous and innovative thesis states that good laws arise from social conflicts, according to the Roman Empire example of the opposition between plebs and nobles. Conflicts are able to bring about order in virtue of the characteristic constrictive force of necessity, which prevents the ambition to prevail. Nonetheless, law does not neutralize the conflict; just give it a regulation. So, law is subjected to history, to the continuous change, which means that it is potentially corruptible. (...)
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