Results for 'Mimesis '

108 found
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  1. Platonic Mimesis.Mitchell Miller - 1999 - In Thomas Falkner, Nancy Felson & David Konstan (eds.), Contextualizing Classics: Ideology, Performance, Dialogue : Essays in Honor of John J. Peradotto. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 253-266.
    A two-fold study, on the one hand of the thought-provoking mimesis by which Plato gives his hearer an occasion for self-knowledge and self-transcendence and of the typical sequential structure, an appropriation of the trajectory of the poem of Parmenides, by which Plato orders the drama of inquiry, and on the other hand a commentary on the Crito that aims to show concretely how these elements — mimesis and Parmenidean structure — work together to give the dialogues their exceptional (...)
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  2. Mimesis according to Rene Girard and business ethical decision making.María Marta Preziosa - 2022 - Veritas: Revista de Filosofía y Teología 52:53–71.
    Resumen: Este artículo tiene como objetivo indagar si la mímesis ―o imitación― tal como la entiende René Girard (1923-2015), afecta el juicio ético ―o evaluación moral― de una acción que el ejecutivo realiza en la empresa. En la primera parte, se caracteriza el juicio ético de acuerdo con una revisión de la literatura de ética empresarial (2010-2020). En la segunda parte, se sintetiza cómo Girard explica la conformación de la sociedad a partir de la mímesis, una fuerza impulsora ambivalente que (...)
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  3. Methexis, Mimesis and Self Duality: Theoretical Physics as Formal Systems.Ignazio Licata - 2014 - Versus 118.
    The naive idea of a mimesis between theory and experiments, a concept still lasing in many epistemologies, is here substituted by a more sophisticated mathematical methexis where theoretical physics is a system of production of formal structures under strong mathematical constraints, such as global and local symmetries. Instead of an ultimate “everything theory”, the image of physical theories here proposed is a totality of interconnected structures establishing the very conditions of its “thinkability” and the relations with the experimental domain.
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  4. The Many Faces of Mimesis: Selected Essays from the 2017 Symposium on the Hellenic Heritage of Western Greece (Heritage of Western Greece Series, Book 3).Heather Reid & Jeremy DeLong (eds.) - 2018 - Sioux city, Iowa: Parnassos Press.
    Mimesis can refer to imitation, emulation, representation, or reenactment - and it is a concept that links together many aspects of ancient Greek Culture. The Western Greek bell-krater on the cover, for example, is painted with a scene from a phlyax play with performers imitating mythical characters drawn from poetry, which also represent collective cultural beliefs and practices. One figure is shown playing a flute, the music from which might imitate nature, or represent deeper truths of the cosmos based (...)
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  5. Fidelity without mimesis: Mental imagery from visual description.Anezka Kuzmicova - 2012 - In Gregory Currie, Petr Kot̓átko & Martin Pokorny (eds.), Mimesis: Metaphysics, Cognition, Pragmatics. College Publications.
    In this paper, I oppose the common assumption that visual descriptions in prose fiction are imageable by virtue of perceptual mimesis. Based on introspection as well as convergent support from cognitive science and other disciplines, I argue that visual description (and the mental imagery it elicits), unlike narrative (and the mental imagery it elicits), often stands in no positive relation to perceptual mimesis because it lacks a structural counterpart in perceptual experience. I present an alternative way of defining (...)
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  6. Technology as Mimesis: Biomimicry as Regenerative Sustainable Design, Engineering, and Technology.Vincent Blok - 2022 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 26 (3):426-446.
    In this article, we investigate how to explain the difference between traditional design, engineering, and technology—which have exploited nature and put increasing pressure on Earth’s carrying capacity since the industrial revolution—and biomimetic design—which claims to explore nature’s sustainable solutions and promises to be regenerative by design. We reflect on the concept of mimesis. Mimesis assumes a continuity between the natural environment as a regenerative model and measure for sustainable design that is imitated and reproduced in biomimetic design, engineering, (...)
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  7. Towards a Diffractive Mimesis: Karen Barad's and Isabelle Stengers' Re-Turnings.Karolina Rybačiauskaitė - 2022 - Journal of Posthumanism 2 (2):139-150.
    This article seeks to further the discussion of mimesis in the current new materialist philosophies that are charged with doubts about the potential of mimetic practices, i.e., practices of reflection, and propose a more differential /diffractive notion of mimesis. It argues that the concept of mimesis and performative approaches to knowledge making can be compatible. The figures of mimesis appear in the conceptualizations of both reflective and diffractive practices, and if mimesis is considered rather as (...)
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  8. Mimesis, kenosis, autoreferenzialità.Emanuele Antonelli - 2015 - Bollettino Filosofico 30:225-246.
    In this paper we offer an interpretation of the inner relationship between nihilism and the tragic. With reference to the work of Heinz von Foester and to the sciences of complexity, we will argue that the essential feature of the tragic is “autoreferentiality”. Furthermore, arguing in favor of the use of the theological notion of kenōsis as the most precise description of the “history of nihilism”, we will show that the latter is to be understood in terms of the “weakening”, (...)
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  9. On Reification and Extreme Violence. Mimesis, Play and Power in Adorno.Marco Angella - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (4):402-419.
    ABSTRACT In this paper, I will offer some examples of the effectiveness of Adorno’s concept of mimesis for an analysis of extreme violence and for a defence of democratic institutions against possible regressions into authoritarian regimes. I will start by reading the concept of mimesis through the lens of the interlacement between the concepts of play and power. My aim is twofold: first, I wish to further the analysis of Adorno’s concept of mimesis by showing that it (...)
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  10. Mímesis e Ficção: Por uma ontologia da representação literária.Rui Uchoa Dornelas - 2017 - Dissertation, Ufpe, Brazil
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  11. Memory and Mimesis.James Bardis - manuscript
    "Memory and Mimesis" commence par une réflexion sur la relation entre l'esprit et la mémoire invoqué par un scénario quotidien de la vie d'un père jouant avec sa fille âgée d'un an dans un bistrot et extrapole, a partir de cette relation, une parallèle relation entre psychologie de l'enfant et de l'évolution humaine en termes du «développement» des formes peu profondes de la mémoire au détriment d'une mémoire plus profonde et primale incorporée dans un esprit non- épiphenominal. -/- -/- (...)
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  12. The Carpenter as a Philosopher Artist: a Critique of Plato's Theory of Mimesis.Ilemobayo John Omogunwa - 2018 - Philosophy Pathways 222 (1).
    Plato’s theory of mimesis is expressed clearly and mainly in Plato’s Republic where he refers to his philosophy of Ideas in his definition of art, by arguing that all arts are imitative in nature. Reality according to him lies with the Idea, and the Form one confronts in this tangible world is a copy of that universal everlasting Idea. He poses that a carpenter’s chair is the result of the idea of chair in his mind, the created chair is (...)
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  13. In and Out of Character: Socratic Mimēsis.Mateo Duque - 2020 - Dissertation, Cuny Graduate Center
    In the "Republic," Plato has Socrates attack poetry’s use of mimēsis, often translated as ‘imitation’ or ‘representation.’ Various scholars (e.g. Blondell 2002; Frank 2018; Halliwell 2009; K. Morgan 2004) have noticed the tension between Socrates’ theory critical of mimēsis and Plato’s literary practice of speaking through various characters in his dialogues. However, none of these scholars have addressed that it is not only Plato the writer who uses mimēsis but also his own character, Socrates. At crucial moments in several dialogues, (...)
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  14.  12
    How to play the Platonic flute: Mimêsis and Truth in Republic X.Gene Fendt - 2018 - In Heather Reid & Jeremy DeLong (eds.), The Many Faces of Mimesis: Selected Essays from the 2017 Symposium on the Hellenic Heritage of Western Greece (Heritage of Western Greece Series, Book 3). Sioux city, Iowa: Parnassos Press. pp. 37-48.
    The usual interpretation of Republic 10 takes it as Socrates’ multilevel philosophical demonstration of the untruth and dangerousness of mimesis and its required excision from a well ordered polity. Such readings miss the play of the Platonic mimesis which has within it precisely ordered antistrophes which turn its oft remarked strophes perfectly around. First, this argument, famously concluding to the unreliability of image-makers for producing knowledge begins with two images—the mirror (596e) and the painter. I will show both (...)
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  15. The power of "Mimesis" and the "Mimesis" of power: Plato's concept of imitation and his judgment on the value of poetry and the arts.Santiago Juan-Navarro - 2007 - Studium 13:97-108.
    For Plato mimesis is the appearance of the external image of things. In his view, the reality was not to be found in the world of objects but in the realm of ideas. Therefore, Plato sees the arts as an occupation that is inferior to science and philosophy, but that is also a potential source of corruption. His concept of imitation, although it evolved over time, led him to take an increasingly dogmatic and intolerant position regarding artistic creation. His (...)
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  16. Tapping the wellsprings of action: Aristotle's birth of tragedy as a mimesis of poetic praxis.Katherine Kretler - 2018 - In Lillian Doherty & Bruce M. King (eds.), Thinking the Greeks: A Volume in Honour of James M. Redfield. Routledge. pp. 70-90.
    This essay offers an interpretation of Aristotle’s account of the birth of tragedy (Poetics 1448b18–1449a15) as a mimesis of poetic praxis. The workings of this passage emerge when read in connection with ring composition in Homeric speeches, and further unfold through a comparison with the Shield of Achilles and with an ode from Euripides’ Heracles. Aristotle appears to draw upon a traditional pattern enacting cyclical rebirth or revitalization. It is suggested that his puzzling insistence on “one complete action” in (...)
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  17. Kreativität und Mimesis. Das Bildschaffen in interkultureller Perspektive.Zhuofei Wang - 2022 - Image. Zeitschrift für Interdisziplinäre Bildwissenschaft 36:102-111.
    As two concepts that are both distinct and intertwined, creativity and mimesis have their own history of development. In the visual arts, both refer primarily to the principles, methods, and procedures of image production. The production of images is neither entirely arbitrary nor entirely plannable, but has its own logic, which lies between work and reality, the inner world and the outer world as well as tradition and innovation. The relevant discourses are influenced by the respective cultural-historical frameworks. Due (...)
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  18. Soul Division and Mimesis in Republic X.Rachel Singpurwalla - 2011 - In Pierre Destrée & Fritz Gregor Herrmann (eds.), Plato and the Poets. pp. 283-298.
    It is well known that in the Republic, Socrates presents a view of the soul or the psyche according to which it has three distinct parts or aspects, which he calls the reasoning, spirited, and appetitive parts. Socrates’ clearest characterization of these parts of the soul occurs in Republic IX, where he suggests that they should be understood in terms of the various goals or ends that give rise to the particular desires that motivate our actions. In Republic X, however, (...)
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  19. How to play the Platonic flute: Mimêsis and Truth in Republic X.Gene Fendt - 2018 - In How to play the Platonic flute: Mimêsis and Truth in Republic X. Sioux city, Iowa: pp. 37-48.
    The usual interpretation of Republic 10 takes it as Socrates’ multilevel philosophical demonstration of the untruth and dangerousness of mimesis and its required excision from a well ordered polity. Such readings miss the play of the Platonic mimesis which has within it precisely ordered antistrophes which turn its oft remarked strophes perfectly around. First, this argument, famously concluding to the unreliability of image-makers for producing knowledge begins with two images—the mirror (596e) and the painter. I will show both (...)
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  20. Mímesis e Tragédia na Poética de Aristóteles.Alexandre Mauro Toledo - 2005 - Dissertation, Ufmg, Brazil
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  21. The Politics of Mimesis in the Platonic Dialogues.Constantinos V. Proimos - 2002 - International Studies in Philosophy 34 (2):83-93.
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  22. Fantaisies architecturales chez Iakov Tchernikhov : surpasser la mimèsis à travers la phantasia comme agent du progrès.Marianna Charitonidou - 2021 - Nouvelle Revue d'Esthétique 27 (1):131-143.
    L’article examine les « compositions » de Tchernikhov en liant sa recherche constante de nouvelles formes à la capacité de convertir les « fantaisies » en représentations. Contrairement à Aristote, qui conçoit la mimèsis comme l’équivalent de l’entreprise artistique, Tchernikhov perçoit ses « compositions » comme des actes de dépassement de la mimèsis par la phantasia. Les illustrations visionnaires de ses Fantaisies architecturales expriment son intention de remplacer les mots par des images graphiques. Son approche est fondée sur la croyance (...)
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  23. "Jacques Derrida. Tentazione di Siracusa. Milano-Udine, Mimesis Edizioni. 74 pp." Reseña de Facundo Bey [Éndoxa (UNED), 2020, No. 46, pp. 497-504, ISSN 2174-5676]. [REVIEW]Facundo Bey - 2020 - Endoxa 46:497-504.
    Tentazione di Siracusa, "Tentación de Siracusa", es el título que eligió Jacques Derrida (1930-2004) para la breve, aunque magistral, conferencia que pronunció el 18 de enero de 2001 en Ortigia, en el Palacio del Senado siracusano. Allí fue convocado por las autoridades del Collegio Siciliano di Filosofía y por el entonces intendente de la comuna sícula, Giambattista Bufardeci, quien le otorgó en tal ocasión la ciudadanía honoraria de esa antigua y culturalmente variada urbe mediterránea, una ciudad atravesada milenariamente por la (...)
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  24. Autor, dzieło i czytelnik w świetle potrójnej mimesis Paula Ricoeura.Marek Kaplita - 2013 - Estetyka I Krytyka 29:115-138.
    This paper concerns the theory of triple mimesis formulated by the contemporary French philosopher, Paul Ricoeur, in his three-volume book Time and Narrative. It is a hermeneutical interpretation of the classical Aristotle’s definition of mimesis from his Poetics. Ricoeur’s argument is aimed at proving, that the way an imitative transformation of the reality in narrative operates, presupposes a circular relation between living experience and a narrative, which mutually determine each other. The main aim of this paper is to (...)
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  25. O ÉTICO E O MIMÉTICO NA EDUCAÇÃO DOS FILHOS: UMA LEITURA DA FUNÇÃO PEDAGÓGICA DA FAMÍLIA, NA FILOSOFIA DO DIREITO DE HEGEL, A PARTIR DO CONCEITO DE MÍMESIS DE RENÉ GIRARD.Wilson Franck Junior - 2021 - Caderno de Resumos Do XIX Congresso Internacional de Filosofia da PUCPR 2021 Subjetividade, Tecnologia E Meio Ambiente.
    Em sua Filosofia do Direito, Hegel, ao tratar da instituição da família e de seu papel na educação dos filhos, intuiu um traço característico da subjetividade infantil: no coração das crianças haveria um desejo de pertencer ao mundo dos adultos. Trata-se de um desejo que poderíamos qualificar de mimético, no sentido da teoria de René Girard, já que as crianças adotam os pais como seus primeiros modelos. Na teoria hegeliana, esse elemento mimético adquire, junto à educação infantil, uma importante função (...)
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  26. Pietro Salis, "Pratiche discorsive razionali. Studi sull'inferenzialismo di Robert Brandom", Milano-Udine, Mimesis Edizioni, 2016, pp. 332. [REVIEW]Giacomo Turbanti - 2018 - Aphex 17.
    Che cosa vuol dire per le espressioni del nostro linguaggio avere un significato? Secondo un approccio oggi sostanzialmente standard in semantica, avere significato vuol dire prima di tutto avere un contenuto rappresentazionale, cioè poter rappresentare qualcosa. Secondo un inferenzialista come Robert Brandom, invece, le espressioni del nostro linguaggio hanno contenuto perché sono inserite in una rete di relazioni inferenziali, rispetto alla quale possono essere utilizzate per dare e richiedere ragioni. Il libro di Pietro Salis, Pratiche discorsive razionali, presenta e discute (...)
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  27. A percepção do mito em Aristóteles: um estudo sobre o aprendizado proporcionado ao espectador/ ouvinte da mimesis poética.Vivian Val Monteiro - 2016 - Dissertation, Ufba, Brazil
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  28.  96
    Dibattiti filosofici. Da Marx a Habermas, a cura di Marcello Ostinelli, Mimesis Edizioni 2023.Marcello Ostinelli (ed.) - 2023 - Milano - Udine: Mimesis Edizioni.
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  29. Review of Iwona Janicka, "Theorizing Contemporary Anarchism: Solidarity, Mimesis and Radical Social Change". [REVIEW]Nathan Jun - 2019 - Anarchist Studies 27 (1):115-117.
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  30. Ecological Innovation: Biomimicry as a New Way of Thinking and Acting Ecologically.Vincent Blok & Bart Gremmen - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (2):203-217.
    In this article, we critically reflect on the concept of biomimicry. On the basis of an analysis of the concept of biomimicry in the literature and its philosophical origin, we distinguish between a strong and a weaker concept of biomimicry. The strength of the strong concept of biomimicry is that nature is seen as a measure by which to judge the ethical rightness of our technological innovations, but its weakness is found in questionable presuppositions. These presuppositions are addressed by the (...)
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  31.  60
    Imagem, Símbolo e Espírito – O emprego da estética na construção do éthos no Mediterr'neo Antigo.Leonardo de Rezende C. Fares - 2022 - Revista de Filosofia e Teologia da Faculdade de São Bento Do Rio de Janeiro 21 (42):561-579.
    This essay aims to appreciate the influence of the use of aesthetics on the process of confectioning the ἦθος (éthos: “character”) in the civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean. An anthropological approach of the premeditated use of different types of arts or techniques, aiming to provide to the individual an ideal image to be emulated allows the keys to the analytical comprehension of how those societies discovered that the several faculties of the human condition interact with its sensitivity. Printing symbols of (...)
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  32. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Aristotle and the Poetics.Angela Curran - 2015 - Routledge.
    Aristotle’s Poetics is the first philosophical account of an art form and is the foundational text in the history of aesthetics. The Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Aristotle and the Poetics is an accessible guide to this often dense and cryptic work. Angela Curran introduces and assesses: Aristotle’s life and the background to the Poetics the ideas and text of the Poetics , including mimēsis ; poetic technē; the definition of tragedy; the elements of poetic composition; the Poetics’ recommendations for tragic (...)
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  33. Ecological Innovation: Biomimicry as a New Way of Thinking and Acting Ecologically.Vincent Blok & Bart Gremmen - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (2):203-217.
    In this article, we critically reflect on the concept of biomimicry. On the basis of an analysis of the concept of biomimicry in the literature and its philosophical origin, we distinguish between a strong and a weaker concept of biomimicry. The strength of the strong concept of biomimicry is that nature is seen as a measure by which to judge the ethical rightness of our technological innovations, but its weakness is found in questionable presuppositions. These presuppositions are addressed by the (...)
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  34. Aesthetic Truth Through the Ages: A Lonerganian Theory of Art History.Ryan Michael Miller - 2020 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 94:139-151.
    Classical authors were generally artistic realists. The predominant aesthetic theory was mimesis, which saw the truth of art as its successful representation of reality. High modernists rejected this aesthetic theory as lifeless, seeing the truth of art as its subjective expression. This impasse has serious consequences for both the Church and the public square. Moving forward requires both, first, an appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of the high modernist critique of classical mimetic theory, and, second, a theory of (...)
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  35. Adorno on Mimetic Rationality: Three Puzzles.Noppen Pierre-Francois - 2017 - Adorno Studies 1 (1):79-100.
    In this paper, I examine Adorno’s controversial claim that human rationality is inherently mimetic. To do so, I break this claim down into three puzzles (the natural historical puzzle, the metaphysical puzzle, and the epistemic puzzle) and consider each in turn. The first puzzle originates in Adorno’s assertion that in the course of human history the mimetic moment of human thought “is melted together with the rational moment”. So whereas, on his narrative, mimesis has become an intrinsic component of (...)
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  36. Art, World, Artworld.Horvath Gizela - 2016 - Synthesis Philosophica 31 (1):117-127.
    Ancient Greek philosophers claimed that the particular task of art was mimesis. This kind of view about the relation between art and the world was dominant until the beginning of the 19th century. The theory of genius rethought this relation, and it did not presume that art needs to mirror the world. On the contrary, it expected originality, that is, the creation of a new world. Since the beginning of the 20th century, the artworld operates under a wider notion (...)
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  37. The Others In/Of Aristotle’s Poetics.Gene Fendt - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Research 22:245-260.
    This paper aims at interpreting (primarily) the first six chapters of Aristotle’s Poetics in a way that dissolves many of the scholarly arguments conceming them. It shows that Aristotle frequently identifies the object of his inquiry by opposing it to what is other than it (in several different ways). As a result aporiai arise where there is only supposed to be illuminating exclusion of one sort or another. Two exemplary cases of this in chapters 1-6 are Aristotle’s account of (...) as other than enunciative speech (speech that makes truth claims, or representation) and his account of the final cause of tragedy in itself as plot, vis a vis its final cause as regards the audience, which is katharsis. Confusions arising from failure to see the otherness of representation and katharsis leads to an overly intellectualist understanding of the purpose of tragedy. (shrink)
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  38. Hermeneutic Photography: An Innovative Intervention in Psychiatric.Jan Sitvast - 2014 - Journal of Psychiatric Nursing 5 (1):17-24.
    This article is about an intervention or approach in mental health care that has been developed from hermeneutics, more specifically the hermeneutics of Ricoeur. In this intervention photography is used as a means to assist patients in a process of meaning making from experiences in their life world. It aims at empowerment and strengthening the agency of patients. It does so by facilitating storytelling. Mimesis, as interpreted by Ricoeur, was found to be a central concept with which we could (...)
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  39. The Clash between Scientific and Religious Worldviews: A Re‐Evaluation.Louis Caruana - 2022 - Heythrop Journal 63 (1):19-26.
    Many assume that science and religion represent two worldviews in mutual conflict. These last decades however, the improved study of the social, psychological and historical dimensions of both science and religion has revealed that the two worldviews may not be as mutually antagonistic as previously assumed. It is important therefore to review carefully the very idea of a clash of worldviews. This paper seeks to make a contribution in this area by exploring the deeper, hidden attitudes and dispositions that are (...)
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  40. Introduction: The Reach of Make-Believe.Sonia Sedivy - 2021 - In Art, Representation, and Make-Believe: Essays on the Philosophy of Kendall L. Walton. New York: Routledge. pp. 1-22.
    The Introduction provides an overview of Kendall Walton’s make-believe framework for a variety of representations and his arguments that such representations are dependent on their social or historical context. Walton argues that diverse representations involve our capacities for imagination and make-believe with props; they overlap with the fictional. Focusing on make-believe with props explains paradigmatic representational arts such as paintings and novels, theater and film. But this perspective reaches beyond the arts: it explains pictures and photographs in general not only (...)
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  41. The Complicated History of Einfühlung.Magdalena Nowak - 2011 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 1 (2):301-326.
    The article analyses the history of the Einfühlung concept. Theories of ‘feeling into’ Nature, works of art or feelings and behaviours of other persons by German philosophers of the second half of the nineteenth century Robert and Friedrich Vischer and Theodor Lipps are evoked, as well as similar theory of understanding (Verstehen) by Wilhelm Dilthey and Friedrich Schleiermacher, to which Dilthey refers. The meaning of the term Einfühlung within Edith Stein’s thought is also analysed. Both Einfühlung and Verstehen were criticized (...)
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  42. Art as "Night": An Art-Theological Treatise.Gavin Keeney - 2010 - Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Press.
    Written over the course of two months in early 2008, Art as "Night" is a series of essays in part inspired by a January 2007 visit to the Velázquez exhibition at the National Gallery of Art, London, with subsequent forays into related themes and art-historical judgments for and against theories of meta-painting. Art as "Night" proposes a type of a-historical dark knowledge crossing painting since Velázquez, but reaching back to the Renaissance, especially Titian and Caravaggio. As a form of formalism, (...)
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  43. Likeness-Making and the Evolution of Cognition.Hajo Greif - 2021 - Biology and Philosophy 37 (1):1-24.
    Paleontological evidence suggests that human artefacts with intentional markings might have originated already in the Lower Paleolithic, up to 500.000 years ago and well before the advent of ‘behavioural modernity’. These markings apparently did not serve instrumental, tool-like functions, nor do they appear to be forms of figurative art. Instead, they display abstract geometric patterns that potentially testify to an emerging ability of symbol use. In a variation on Ian Hacking’s speculative account of the possible role of “likeness-making” in the (...)
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  44. El problema de la demarcación en estética: Una crítica del criterio de Danto.Andrés Páez - 2008 - Revista de Estudios Sociales 29:146-155.
    El desarrollo de las artes visuales durante el siglo XX desdibujó la frontera entre aquellos objetos y artefactos que llamamos obras de arte, y aquéllos que no son merecedores de ese título. Arthur Danto ha propuesto una teoría estética a la luz de la cual sería posible volver a definir los límites del arte. En este ensayo examino dos de los aspectos más problemáticos de la teoría: la importancia excesiva que Danto le otorga al concepto de mímesis y su concepción (...)
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  45. Do AIs Have Dasein? A Heideggerian-Girardian Answer.Jashiel Resto Quiñones - forthcoming - In Thomas Ryba & Sandy Goodhart (eds.), Desiring Machines. Bloomsbury.
    This paper is one (among many) approach to the question, “are AIs persons or are they conscious?” from a Heideggerian perspective. Here I argue for two claims. First, I argue that René Girard’s mimetic analysis of mitsein (being-with), one of Heidegger’s foundational concepts, illuminates what Heidegger takes mitsein to be. Second, I claim that this Girardian analysis gives us a way to answer the question of whether AIs have Dasein, to which I argue that the answer is negative. Specifically, I (...)
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  46. Marxism and the philosophy of music. The Case of Georg Lukacs.Panos Ntouvos - 2023 - Düren: Shaker Verlag.
    The present book is an in-depth study of Lukács’ musical aesthetics and, more specifically, of his essay on music from The Specificity of the Aesthetic (Die Eigenart des Ästhetischen, 1963). Lukács’ problematic in this essay revolves around a central issue in the history of Aesthetics: the problem of mimesis in music. Since the time of Plato and Aristotle music has been regarded as a mimesis (an imitation) of reality. However, this theory of music as mimesis presents major (...)
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  47. Mimetic Perfection: St Gregory Of Nyssa's Poetry of the Self.Timm Heinbokel - 2020 - St Vladimir's Theological Quarterly 64 (3-4):97-128.
    “Christianity is a μίμησις of the divine nature.” This definition of what it means to be a Christian, given by St Gregory of Nyssa in his letter De pro- fessione Christiana, employs a term commonly translated as “imitation” or “representation.” Even a brief study of some of the seminal sources of classical Greek thought, however, will show that the concept of mimesis surpasses any of these translations and effortlessly crosses the boundaries of the sphere of aesthetics, towards the fundamental (...)
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  48. The Soundscape of the Huainanzi 淮南子: Poetry, Performance, Philosophy, and Praxis in Early China.Peter Tsung Kei Wong - 2022 - Early China 45:515-539.
    This article proposes that oral performance could be a philosophical activity in early China. The focus is on the Huainanzi, a densely rhymed philosophical treatise compiled by Liu An in the second century b.c.e. I show that the tome contains various sound-correlated poetic forms that are intended not only to enable textual performance but also, by means of aural mimesis, to encourage the intuitive understanding of its philosophical messages. Thus scholars of ancient poetry, philosophy, or intellectual history, despite being (...)
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  49. Interacción Internalizada: El desarrollo especular del lenguaje y del orden simbólico (Internalized interaction: The specular development of language and the symbolic order).José Angel García Landa - manuscript
    This paper expounds a symbolic interactionist theory of consciousness as an emergent phenomenon. It relates Michael Arbib's theory of the origin of language and Erving Goffman's frame analysis, especially as it bears on our understanding of the subject and of personal experience. Reflexivity and fictional mimesis are shown to be inherent to the origin of language and to the continuing emergent creativity of human communicative action. The emergent aspect of consciousness is also dealt with from the perspective of a (...)
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  50. Forms of enlightenment in art.Brian R. Nelson - 2010 - Cambridge, England: Open Angle Books.
    Mimesis and the portrayal of reflective life in action : Aristotle's Poetics and Sophocles' Oedipus the King -- The portrayal of reflective life in action in poetry : Shakespeare's dramatization of the poet in Sonnets 1-126 -- The portrayal of reflective life in action in music : Bach's Prelude and Fugue in B flat minor (The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book 1) and Beethoven's String Quartet in A minor, opus 132 -- The portrayal of reflective life in action in painting : (...)
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