Results for 'Omar Edward Moad'

Order:
  1. Comparing Phases of Skepticism in Al-Ghazālī and Descartes: Some First Meditations on Deliverance From Error.Omar Edward Moad - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (1):pp. 88-101.
    Abū Hāmid al-Ghazālī (1058–1111 c.e .) is well known, among other things, for his account, in al-Munqidh min al-ḍalāl (Deliverance from error), of a struggle with philosophical skepticism that bears a striking resemblance to that described by Descartes in the Meditations . This essay aims to give a close comparative analysis of these respective accounts, and will concentrate solely on the processes of invoking or entertaining doubt that al-Ghazālī and Descartes describe, respectively. In the process some subtle differences between them (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2. A Significant Difference Between Al-Ghazālī and Hume on Causation.Edward Omar Moad - 2008 - Journal of Islamic Philosophy 3:22-39.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. A Path to the Oasis: Sharī‘Ah and Reason in Islamic Moral Epistemology.Edward Omar Moad - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (3):135 - 148.
    I propose a framework for comparative Islamic—Western ethics in which the Islamic categories "Islam, Iman," and "Ihsan" are juxtaposed with the concepts of obligation, value, and virtue, respectively. I argue that "shari'a" refers to both the obligation component and the entire structure of the Islamic ethic; suggesting a suspension of the understanding of "shari'a" as simply Islamic "law," and an alternative understanding of "usul al-fiqh" as a moral epistemology of obligation. I will test this approach by addressing the question of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. The Jinn and the Shayatin.Edward Moad - 2017 - In Benjamin McCraw & Robert Arp (eds.), Philosophical Approaches to Demonology. New York, NY, USA: pp. 137-155.
    If by “demon” one understands an evil occult being, then its equivalent in the Islamic narrative is the intersection of the category jinn with that of the shayātīn: a demon is a shaytān from among the jinn. The literature in the Islamic tradition on these subjects is vast. In what follows, we will select some key elements from it to provide a brief summary: first on the nature of the jinn, their nature, and their relationship to God and human beings; (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  76
    Actualism and the Distinction of Truth Over Truth in a World.Edward Moad - 2008 - Sorites 20:43-48.
    Robert Adams characterizes actualism regarding possible worlds as «the view that if there are any true statements in which there are said to be nonactual possible worlds, they must be reducible to statements in which the only things there are said to be are things which there are in the actual world, and which are not identical with nonactual possibles.» In this paper, I will briefly explain actualism about possible worlds, showing that an essential pillar of the theory is the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Ibn Khaldun and Occasionalism.Edward Moad - 2017 - In Nazif Muhtaroglu (ed.), Occasionalism Revisited. Abu Dhabi - United Arab Emirates: pp. 61-82.
    Ibn Khaldun (1332-1406) is said to be the first scholar to make history and society the direct objects of a systematic science. This paper will examine the role of occasionalism in his thought. This question is interesting because a perennial objection to occasionalism has been that it denies any real natural order, and therefore precludes the possibility of any systematic natural science. If Ibn Khaldun was an occasionalist, then it would mean that one of the earliest pioneers in attempting to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  33
    Moral Dilemmas.Edward Moad - 2013 - In Vibha Chaturvedi & Pragati Sahni (eds.), Understanding Ethics. New Delhi, Delhi, India: pp. 304-314.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Problem's with Aquinas' Third Way.Edward Moad - 2016 - In Robert Arp (ed.), Revisiting Aquinas' Proofs for the Existence of God. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill. pp. 131-140.
    The object of this paper is not arguments from contingency in general, but specifically Aquinas’s ‘Third Way’ as it appears in his Summa Theologica. I will raise three objections to this argument. First, the argument depends on the premise, that if everything were contingent, then there would have been a time during which nothing exists, but this is not self-evident and no argument is given for it here. Secondly, Aquinas tells us that a key premise in this argument, that an (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Dukkha, Inaction and Nirvana: Suffering, Weariness and Death? A Look at Nietzsche's Criticisms of Buddhist Philosophy.O. Moad - 2004 - The Philosopher 92 (1).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Hilmi Omar Budda’s Contribution to the History of Religions / Hi̇lmi̇ ömer budda’nin di̇nler tari̇hi̇ di̇si̇pli̇ni̇ne katkisi.Cemil Kutluturk - 2017 - Sakarya Üniversitesi İlahiyat Fakültesi Dergisi 19 (36):139-167.
    Hilmi Omar Budda (1894-1952) has played a significant role in the process of institutionalization of History of Religions in Turkey. He, who was the first academician in the field of History of Religions in Turkey, lectured for many years in Dâru’l-Funûn (Ottoman University) Faculty of Divinity, which was found in 1924. Then he worked in department of Institute of Islamic Sciences, which was a branch of Istanbul University Faculty of Arts, by pursuing his same position and career. After that, (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Doing, Allowing, and the State.Adam Omar Hosein - 2014 - Law and Philosophy 33 (2):235-264.
    The doing/allowing distinction plays an important role in our thinking about a number of legal issues, such as the need for criminal process protections, prohibitions on torture, the permissibility of the death penalty and so on. These are areas where, at least initially, there seem to be distinctions between harms that the state inflicts and harms that it merely allows. In this paper I will argue for the importance of the doing/allowing distinction as applied to state action. Sunstein, Holmes, Vermeule (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Unawareness and Implicit Belief.Edward J. R. Elliott - manuscript
    Possible worlds models of belief have difficulties accounting for unawareness, the inability to entertain (and hence believe) certain propositions. Accommodating unawareness is important for adequately modelling epistemic states, and representing the informational content to which agents have in principle access given their explicit beliefs. In this paper, I develop a model of explicit belief, awareness, and informational content, along with an sound and complete axiomatisation. I furthermore defend the model against the seminal impossibility result of Dekel, Lipman and Rustichini, according (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  24
    Trust and Will.Edward Hinchman - 2020 - In Judith Simon (ed.), Routledge Handbook on Trust and Philosophy. New York: Routledge.
    This paper treats two questions about the relation between trust and the will. One question, about trust, is whether you can trust ‘at will.’ Can you trust despite acknowledging that you lack evidence of the trustee’s worthiness of your trust? Another question, about the will, is whether you can exercise your will at all without trust – at least, in yourself. I treat the second question as a guide to the first, arguing that the role of trust in the will (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  39
    Another Look at the Modal Collapse Argument.Omar Fakhri - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (1):1-23.
    On one classical conception of God, God has no parts, not even metaphysical parts. God is not composed of form and matter, act and potency, and he is not composed of existence and essence. God is absolutely simple. This is the doctrine of Absolute Divine Simplicity. It is claimed that ADS implies a modal collapse, i.e. that God’s creation is absolutely necessary. I argue that a proper way of understanding the modal collapse argument naturally leads the proponent of ADS to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  95
    Review of Idealism and Christian Theology. [REVIEW]Omar Fakhri - 2018 - Journal of Analytic Theology 6:716-721.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Impossible Worlds and Partial Belief.Edward Elliott - 2019 - Synthese 196 (8):3433-3458.
    One response to the problem of logical omniscience in standard possible worlds models of belief is to extend the space of worlds so as to include impossible worlds. It is natural to think that essentially the same strategy can be applied to probabilistic models of partial belief, for which parallel problems also arise. In this paper, I note a difficulty with the inclusion of impossible worlds into probabilistic models. Under weak assumptions about the space of worlds, most of the propositions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17.  70
    Assertion and Testimony.Edward Hinchman - 2020 - In Sanford Goldberg (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Assertion. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    [The version of this paper published by Oxford online in 2019 was not copy-edited and has some sense-obscuring typos. I have posted a corrected (but not the final published) version on this site. The version published in print in 2020 has these corrections.] Which is more fundamental, assertion or testimony? Should we understand assertion as basic, treating testimony as what you get when you add an interpersonal addressee? Or should we understand testimony as basic, treating mere assertion -- assertion without (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. A Representation Theorem for Frequently Irrational Agents.Edward Elliott - 2017 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 46 (5):467-506.
    The standard representation theorem for expected utility theory tells us that if a subject’s preferences conform to certain axioms, then she can be represented as maximising her expected utility given a particular set of credences and utilities—and, moreover, that having those credences and utilities is the only way that she could be maximising her expected utility. However, the kinds of agents these theorems seem apt to tell us anything about are highly idealised, being always probabilistically coherent with infinitely precise degrees (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19. Normative Decision Theory.Edward Elliott - 2019 - Analysis 79 (4):755-772.
    A review of some major topics of debate in normative decision theory from circa 2007 to 2019. Topics discussed include the ongoing debate between causal and evidential decision theory, decision instability, risk-weighted expected utility theory, decision-making with incomplete preferences, and decision-making with imprecise credences.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Spacetime, Ontology, and Structural Realism.Edward Slowik - 2005 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 19 (2):147 – 166.
    This essay explores the possibility of constructing a structural realist interpretation of spacetime theories that can resolve the ontological debate between substantivalists and relationists. Drawing on various structuralist approaches in the philosophy of mathematics, as well as on the theoretical complexities of general relativity, our investigation will reveal that a structuralist approach can be beneficial to the spacetime theorist as a means of deflating some of the ontological disputes regarding similarly structured spacetimes.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  21. Hobbes and the Phantasm of Space.Edward Slowik - 2014 - Hobbes Studies 27 (1):61-79.
    This essay examines Hobbes’ philosophy of space, with emphasis placed on the variety of interpretations that his concept of imaginary space has elicited from commentators. The process by which the idea of space is acquired from experience, as well as the role of nominalism, will be offered as important factors in tracking down the elusive content of Hobbes’ conception of imaginary space.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22. Newton's Metaphysics of Space: A “Tertium Quid” Betwixt Substantivalism and Relationism, or Merely a “God of the (Rational Mechanical) Gaps”?Edward Slowik - 2009 - Perspectives on Science 17 (4):pp. 429-456.
    This paper investigates the question of, and the degree to which, Newton’s theory of space constitutes a third-way between the traditional substantivalist and relationist ontologies, i.e., that Newton judged that space is neither a type of substance/entity nor purely a relation among such substances. A non-substantivalist reading of Newton has been famously defended by Howard Stein, among others; but, as will be demonstrated, these claims are problematic on various grounds, especially as regards Newton’s alleged rejection of the traditional substance/accident dichotomy (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  23. Newton’s Neo-Platonic Ontology of Space.Edward Slowik - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (3):419-448.
    This paper investigates Newton’s ontology of space in order to determine its commitment, if any, to both Cambridge neo-Platonism, which posits an incorporeal basis for space, and substantivalism, which regards space as a form of substance or entity. A non-substantivalist interpretation of Newton’s theory has been famously championed by Howard Stein and Robert DiSalle, among others, while both Stein and the early work of J. E. McGuire have downplayed the influence of Cambridge neo-Platonism on various aspects of Newton’s own spatial (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  24. The Definition of Systematizing in S. Baron-Cohen's Gender and Autism Research.Terence Rajivan Edward - 2018 - Philosophical Pathways (219):1-4.
    The professor of psychopathology Simon Baron-Cohen is well-known for his thesis that males are on average better at systematizing than empathizing and females are on average better at empathizing than systematizing. In this paper, I note an ambiguity in how he defines systematizing.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Comparativism and the Measurement of Partial Belief.Edward Elliott - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-28.
    According to comparativism, degrees of belief are reducible to a system of purely ordinal comparisons of relative confidence. (For example, being more confident that P than that Q, or being equally confident that P and that Q.) In this paper, I raise several general challenges for comparativism, relating to (i) its capacity to illuminate apparently meaningful claims regarding intervals and ratios of strengths of belief, (ii) its capacity to draw enough intuitively meaningful and theoretically relevant distinctions between doxastic states, and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Descartes and Individual Corporeal Substance.Edward Slowik - 2001 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (1):1 – 15.
    This essay explores the vexed issue of individual corporeal substance in Descartes' natural philosophy. Although Descartes' often referred to individual material objects as separate substances, the constraints on his definitions of matter and substance would seem to favor the opposite view; namely, that there exists only one corporeal substance, the plenum. In contrast to this standard interpretation, however, it will be demonstrated that Descartes' hypotheses make a fairly convincing case for the existence of individual material substances; and the key to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  27. Descartes, Spacetime, and Relational Motion.Edward Slowik - 1999 - Philosophy of Science 66 (1):117-139.
    This paper examines Descartes' problematic relational theory of motion, especially when viewed within the context of his dynamics, the Cartesian natural laws. The work of various commentators on Cartesian motion is also surveyed, with particular emphasis placed upon the recent important texts of Garber and Des Chene. In contrast to the methodology of most previous interpretations, however, this essay employs a modern "spacetime" approach to the problem. By this means, the role of dynamics in Descartes' theory, which has often been (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  28. Plotinian Henadology.Edward P. Butler - 2016 - Kronos - metafizyka, kultura, religia 1 (5):143-159.
    Plotinus’ famous treatise against the Gnostics (33), together with contemporary and thematically related treatises on Intelligible Beauty (31), on Number (34), and on Free Will and the Will of the One (39), can be seen as providing the essential components of a Plotinian defense of polytheism against conceptual moves that, while associated for him primarily with Gnostic sectarians overlapping with Platonic philosophical circles, will become typical of monotheism in its era of hegemony. When Plotinus’ Gnostics ‘contract’ divinity into a single (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. A Solution to the Surprise Exam Paradox.Terence Rajivan Edward - 2017 - Filozofia 72 (4):325-327.
    The students’ argument against the possibility of a surprise exam assumes that the following would not occur: the teacher decides to give the exam on a certain day; the teacher believes that the exam would be a surprise on that day; but, actually, the exam would not be a surprise on that day. I give a reason to reject this assumption, and I point out that an attempt to reformulate the surprise exam paradox in order to allow for the assumption (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. On Structuralism’s Multiple Paths Through Spacetime Theories.Edward Slowik - 2012 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 2 (1):45-66.
    This essay examines the underdetermination problem that plagues structuralist approaches to spacetime theories, with special emphasis placed on the epistemic brands of structuralism, whether of the scientific realist variety or not. Recent non-realist structuralist accounts, by Friedman and van Fraassen, have touted the fact that different structures can accommodate the same evidence as a virtue vis-à-vis their realist counterparts; but, as will be argued, these claims gain little traction against a properly constructed liberal version of epistemic structural realism. Overall, a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31. Why Interpret Quantum Physics?Edward MacKinnon - 2016 - Open Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):86-102.
    This article probes the question of what interpretations of quantum mechanics actually accomplish. In other domains, which are briefly considered, interpretations serve to make alien systematizations intelligible to us. This often involves clarifying the status of their implicit ontology. A survey of interpretations of non-relativistic quantum mechanics supports the evaluation that these interpretations make a contribution to philosophy, but not to physics. Interpretations of quantum field theory are polarized by the divergence between the Lagrangian field theory that led to the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. The Intelligible Gods in the Platonic Theology of Proclus.Edward P. Butler - 2008 - Méthexis 21:131-143.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33. On the Cartesian Ontology of General Relativity: Or, Conventionalism in the History of the Substantival‐Relational Debate.Edward Slowik - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (5):1312-1323.
    Utilizing Einstein’s comparison of General Relativity and Descartes’ physics, this investigation explores the alleged conventionalism that pervades the ontology of substantival and relationist conceptions of spacetime. Although previously discussed, namely by Rynasiewicz and Hoefer, it will be argued that the close similarities between General Relativity and Cartesian physics have not been adequately treated in the literature—and that the disclosure of these similarities bolsters the case for a conventionalist interpretation of spacetime ontology.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  34. The 'Properties' of Leibnizian Space: Whither Relationism?Edward Slowik - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (1):107-129.
    This essay examines the metaphysical foundation of Leibniz’s theory of space against the backdrop of the subtantivalism/relationism debate and at the ontological level of material bodies and properties. As will be demonstrated, the details of Leibniz’ theory defy a straightforward categorization employing the standard relationism often attributed to his views. Rather, a more careful analysis of his metaphysical doctrines related to bodies and space will reveal the importance of a host of concepts, such as the foundational role of God, the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35. Taking the Concepts of Others Seriously.Terence Rajivan Edward - 2016 - Meta 8 (1):143-153.
    This paper assesses an argument against the representationalist tradition in anthropology: the tradition of reporting how a cultural group represents the world. According to the argument, anthropologists working within this tradition cannot take the concepts of those they study seriously. I defend the representationalist tradition against this argument.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Plato's Gods and the Way of Ideas.Edward P. Butler - 2011 - Diotima 39:73-87.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. Ending the so-Called 'Friedman-Freeman'debate.R. Edward Freeman - 2008 - Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (2):153-190.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  38. The Deep Metaphysics of Quantum Gravity: The Seventeenth Century Legacy and an Alternative Ontology Beyond Substantivalism and Relationism.Edward Slowik - 2013 - Studies in the History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (4):490-499.
    This essay presents an alternative to contemporary substantivalist and relationist interpretations of quantum gravity hypotheses by means of an historical comparison with the ontology of space in the seventeenth century. Utilizing differences in the spatial geometry between the foundational theory and the theory derived from the foundational, in conjunction with nominalism and platonism, it will be argued that there are crucial similarities between seventeenth century and contemporary theories of space, and that these similarities reveal a host of underlying conceptual issues (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. The Consistent Histories Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics.Edward MacKinnon - unknown
    The consistent histories reformulation of quantum mechanics was developed by Robert Griffiths, given a formal logical systematization by Roland Omn\`{e}s, and under the label `decoherent histories', was independently developed by Murray Gell-Mann and James Hartle and extended to quantum cosmology. Criticisms of CH involve issues of meaning, truth, objectivity, and coherence, a mixture of philosophy and physics. We will briefly consider the original formulation of CH and some basic objections. The reply to these objections, like the objections themselves, involves a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40. Are There Uncontroversial Error Theories?Terence Rajivan Edward - 2011 - Philosophical Pathways (162).
    This paper evaluates an argument for the conclusion that in order to produce a viable objection to a particular error theory, the objection must not be applicable to any error theory. The reason given for this conclusion is that error theories about some discourses are uncontroversial. But the examples given of uncontroversial error theories are not good ones, nor do there appear to be other examples available.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41. Nagel on Conceivability.Terence Rajivan Edward - 2009 - Abstracta 5 (1):16-29.
    In the sixth chapter of The View from Nowhere, Thomas Nagel aims to identify a form of idealism, to isolate the argument for it and to counter this argument. The position that Nagel takes to be idealist is that what there is must be possibly conceivable by us. In this paper, I show that Nagel has not made a convincing case against this position. I then present an alternative case. In light of this alternative case, we have reason to reject (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  73
    Descartes' Quantity of Motion: 'New Age' Holism Meets the Cartesian Conservation Principle.Edward Slowik - 1999 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 80 (2):178–202.
    This essay explores various problematical aspects of Descartes' conservation principle for the quantity of motion (size times speed), particularly its largely neglected "dual role" as a measure of both durational motion and instantaneous "tendencies towards motion". Overall, an underlying non-local, or "holistic", element of quantity of motion (largely derived from his statics) will be revealed as central to a full understanding of the conservation principle's conceptual development and intended operation; and this insight can be of use in responding to some (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  43. Newton, the Parts of Space, and the Holism of Spatial Ontology.Edward Slowik - 2011 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (2):249-272.
    This article investigates the problem of the identity of the parts of space in Newton’s natural philosophy, as well as the holistic or structuralist nature of Newton’s ontology of space. Additionally, this article relates the lessons reached in this historical and philosophical investigation to analogous debates in contemporary space-time ontology. While previous contributions, by Nerlich, Huggett, and others, have proven to be informative in evaluating Newton’s claims, it will be argued that the underlying goals of Newton’s views have largely eluded (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44. Adaptive Diversity and Misbelief.Edward T. Cokely & Adam Feltz - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (6):516.
    Although it makes some progress, McKay & Dennett's (M&D's) proposal is limited because (1) the argument for adaptive misbelief is not new, (2) arguments overextend the evidence provided, and (3) the alleged sufficient conditions are not as prohibitive as suggested. We offer alternative perspectives and evidence, including individual differences research, indicating that adaptive misbeliefs are likely much more widespread than implied.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. On the Logic of the Ontological Argument.Paul E. Oppenheimer & Edward N. Zalta - 1991 - Philosophical Perspectives 5:509-529.
    In this paper, the authors show that there is a reading of St. Anselm's ontological argument in Proslogium II that is logically valid (the premises entail the conclusion). This reading takes Anselm's use of the definite description "that than which nothing greater can be conceived" seriously. Consider a first-order language and logic in which definite descriptions are genuine terms, and in which the quantified sentence "there is an x such that..." does not imply "x exists". Then, using an ordinary logic (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  46.  20
    Assessment of Serum Zinc and Albumin Levels Among Newly Diagnosed Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Khartoum State.Nuha Eljaili Abubaker, Hassan Siddig AbdElgader Omar & Hind Haidar Ahmed - 2019 - International Journal of Academic Health and Medical Research (IJAHMR) 3 (5):1-9.
    Abstract: Background: Tuberculosis is a major public health problem world-wide, it is contagious disease caused by organism mycobacterium tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to assess the level of zinc and albumin in newly diagnosed patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Khartoum state. Methods: Fifty blood samples were collected from newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients during the period between April to May 2017, chosen randomly from Abu Anga Teaching Hospital and fifty blood samples from apparently healthy individuals serve as control (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  92
    Presence of Amphibian Species Prediction Using Features Obtained From GIS and Satellite Images.Nadia Shaker Habib, Omar Kamal Abu Maghasib, Ahmed Rashad Al-Ghazali, Bassem S. Abu-Nasser & Samy S. Abu-Naser - 2020 - International Journal of Academic and Applied Research (IJAAR) 4 (11):13-22.
    The establishment of the transport infrastructure is usually preceded by an EIA procedure, which should determine amphibian breeding sites and migration routes. However, evaluation is very difficult due to the large number of habitats spread over a vast area and the limited time available for field work. An artificial Neural Network (ANN) is proposed for predicting the presence of amphibians species near the water reservoirs based on features obtained from GIS systems and satellite images. The dataset collected from UCI Machine (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. What Can We Learn From Happiness Surveys?Edward Skidelsky - 2014 - Journal of Practical Ethics 2 (2):20-32.
    Defenders of happiness surveys often claim that individuals are infallible judges of their own happiness. I argue that this claim is untrue. Happiness, like other emotions, has three features that make it vulnerable to introspective error: it is dispositional, it is intentional, and it is publically manifest. Other defenders of the survey method claim, more modestly, that individuals are in general reliable judges of their own happiness. I argue that this is probably true, but that it limits what happiness surveys (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. In Incognito: The Principle of Double Effect in American Constitutional Law.Edward C. Lyons - 2005 - Florida Law Review 57 (3):469-563.
    Abstract: In Vacco v. Quill, 521 U.S. 793 (1997), the Supreme Court for the first time in American case law explicitly applied the principle of double effect to reject an equal protection claim to physician-assisted suicide. Double effect, traced historically to Thomas Aquinas, proposes that under certain circumstances it is permissible unintentionally to cause foreseen evil effects that would not be permissible to cause intentionally. The court rejected the constitutional claim on the basis of a distinction marked out by the (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  66
    Perfect Solidity: Natural Laws and the Problem of Matter in Descartes' Universe.Edward Slowik - 1996 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 13 (2):187 - 204.
    In the Principles of Philosophy, Descartes attempts to explicate the well-known phenomena of varying bodily size through an appeal to the concept of "solidity," a notion that roughly corresponds to our present-day concept of density. Descartes' interest in these issues can be partially traced to the need to define clearly the role of matter in his natural laws, a problem particularly acute for the application of his conservation principle. Specifically, since Descartes insists that a body's "quantity of motion," defined as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations