Results for 'Shi Fei'

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  1. 存在”、“此在是非”——兼论庄子海德格尔对人的存在问题观点之异同(“Sein”, “DaseinandShi Fei”: Zhuang Zi and Heidggers Opinions on the Issue of Human Existence).Keqian Xu - 1999 - 南京师大学报(Journal of Nanjing Normal University) 1999 (6):25-30.
    The thorny problem, which we are confronted with in translating the term ofSein”(Being) from western Philosophy into Chinese, highlights the ambiguity, paradoxy and vagueness of (...)the issue of Sein from a specific viewpoint. Although there is no exact equivalent in Chinese for the word ofSein”, we use several different words to express the meanings consisted in the issue ofSein”. By comparison we may find that what is discussed by Zhuang Zi using the terms ofShiandFeiare just in a considerable degree the same issue discussed by Heidegger using the terms ofSeinandDasein”. However, they gave different opinions to the issue, which show their divergence in their philosophic thinking. (shrink)
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  2. Xunzi and Han Fei on Human Nature.Alejandro Bárcenas - 2012 - International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):135-148.
    It is commonly accepted that Han Fei studied under Xunzi sometime during the late third century BCE. However, there is surprisingly little dedicated to the in-depth (...)study of the relationship between Xunzis ideas and one of his best-known followers. In this essay I argue that Han Feis notion of xing, commonly translated as human nature, was not only influenced by Xunzi but also that it is an important feature of his political philosophy. (shrink)
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  3. The Unique Features of Hui Shi's Thought: A Comparative Study Between Hui Shi and Other Pre-Qin Philosophers.Keqian Xu - 1997 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 24 (2):231-253.
    Hui Shi (370-310B.C.E.?) is a unique one among the pre-Qin scholars. The object and orientation of his scholarship emphasized onchasing after the materials (...)or the research for objective knowledge of natural things. He shows a tendency of tolerating and advocating diversity and variety, and intentionally pursuing new and unusual ideas. In certain degree he judges the value of knowledge by its truthfulness rather than its usefulness. As pointed out by Wing-tsit Chan, Hui shi represents atendency in ancient China toward intellectualism for its own sake”. (shrink)
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  4. Han Fei's Enlightened Ruler.Alejandro Bárcenas - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (3):236-259.
    In this essay I revise, based on the notion of theenlightened ruleror mingzhu and his critique of the literati of his time, the common belief (...)
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  5.  26
    Knowledge and Authority in ShīĪ Philosophy.Hossein Ziai - 2001 - In Linda Clarke (ed.), Shī‘ite Heritage: Essays on Classical and Modern Traditions. Binghamton and New York: GLOBAL PUBLICATIONS, Binghamton University. pp. 359-374.
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  6. Makeham, John, Ed., Dao Companion to Neo-Confucian Philosophy.Deborah A. Sommer - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):283-287.
    This volume includes nineteen articles by scholars from Asia, North America, and Europe on Chinese thinkers from the eleventh to the eighteenth centuries. Included here are intellectual (...)
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  7.  24
    Ontology and Cosmology of the ʿaql in Ṣadrā's Commentary on Uṣūl Al-Kāfī.Amir Asghari - 2017 - Journal of Shi'a Islamic Studies 10 (2):157-182.
    ABSTRACT: Mullā Ṣadrās (c 1571-1640) commentary on Uṣūl al- Kāfī is one of the more famous commentaries on this significant Shii hadith collection. For his (...)
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  8. 中國哲學之”“”“”“”“”.Keqian Xu - 2007 - Jounal of Nanjing Normal University 2007 (5):29-33.
    The fundamental task of philosophy is to seek forShiorBeing”. One of the features of Chinese Philosophy is that it seeksShi是(Bing)” throughshi实(fact)”, (...)
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  9. Tusi's Three Philosophical Questions ( Appendix: Arabic Text).Pirooz Fatoorchi - 2014 - International Journal of Shi'i Studies 9 (2):13-14.
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  10. Review of The Quran and the Secular Mind: A Philosophy of Islam, Shabbir Akhtar, 2008[REVIEW]Amir Dastmalchian - 2010 - Journal of Shi‘a Islamic Studies 3 (4):498-501.
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  11.  60
    A Branched Model For Substantial Motion.Muhammad Legenhausen - 2009 - Journal of Shi‘a Islamic Studies 2:53-67.
    The seventeenth century Muslim philosopher Muhammad Sadr al-Din Shirazi, known as Mulla Sadra, introduced the idea of substantial motion in Islamic philosophy. This view is characterized (...)by a continuity criterion for diachronic identity, a four-dimensional view of individual substances, the notion that possibilities change, and the continual creation of all creatures. Modern philosophical logic provides means to model a variety of claims about individuals, substances, modality and time. In this paper, the semantics of formal systems discussed by Carnap, Bressan and Gupta are reviewed with regard to the issue of substance and identity. Next a model introduced by Storrs McCall is described that is able to build upon and yet resolve some of the issues about substance and identity as characterized by Bressan and others. McCalls model is also shown to be able to provide an illustration of Mulla Sadras doctrine of substantial motion. (shrink)
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  12. Zhu Xis Spiritual Practice as the Basis of His Central Philosophical Concepts.Joseph A. Adler - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):57-79.
    The argument is that (1) the spiritual crisis that Zhu Xi discussed with Zhang Shi 張栻 (11331180) and the othergentlemen of Hunanfrom about 1167 (...)to 1169, which was resolved by an understanding of what we might call the interpenetration of the mind’s stillness and activity (dong-jing 動靜) or equilibrium and harmony (zhong-he 中和), (2) led directly to his realization that Zhou Dunyi’s thought provided a cosmological basis for that resolution, and (3) this in turn led Zhu Xi to understand (or construct) the meaning of taiji in terms of the polarity of yin and yang; i.e. the Supreme Polarity as the most fundamental ordering principle (li 理). (shrink)
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  13.  9
    A Study and Critique of the «Tark-i Awlà» Approach in Justifying Prophets' Lapses.Hossein Atrak - 2018 - Journal of Philosophical-Theological Research 20 (76):29-56.
    Abstract This article delves into the study of the term «tark-i awlà» (abandoning performance of that which is better and doing that which is less than (...)better) as an approach for defending the infallibility of the prophets when confronting verses from the Holy Qurān that apparently prove the prophets committed sins; and after going into the semantics of «tark-i awlà», the following question has been made the focus of discussion and study: are the intellectual arguments proving the infalliblity of the Prophets in agreement with the fact that the prophets committed tark-i awlà? According to the author, considering that tark-i awlà is a type of error and lapse and because the intellectual arguments for infallibility (like the trust and certitude of the people, the guiding purpose of prophet hood, the necessity of following the prophets, the principle of luṭf (grace) and absence of disinclination in the hearts of the people towards the prophets) necessitate the negation of all types of errors and lapses from the prophets, the prophets must be infallible from tark-i awlà too and this approach by Islamic theologians in justifying the verses that indicate the committing of sins by the prophets is not successful. Accepting the committing of tark-i awlà by the prophets is to accept that they committed errors and is against the belief of the Shia regarding the infallibility of the prophets. As a result, Shia theology will face a great challenge in justifying the verses that indicate the committing of errors and lapses by the Prophets which, according to the author, necessitates a revision of the Shia theological belief in regards to the absolute infallibility of the prophets. (shrink)
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  14. Existential Anthropology: What Could It Be? An Interpretation of Heidegger.Piette Albert - 2014 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 4 (2).
    Based on an interpretation of the work of martin Heidegger, this article o ers a shi away om social and cultural anthropology, which explores sociocultural aspects, and (...)
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