Creation

Edited by Daniel Von Wachter (International Academy of Philosophy In The Principality of Liechtenstein)
View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories
Subcategories:See also:

18 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
Material to categorize
  1. Sonsuz Tecellî ve Daimî Yaratma: İbn Arabī ve İbn Teymiyye’nin Yaratma Meselesine Ezelî Fiil Olarak Bakışı.Emrah Kaya - 2016 - Ankara Universitesi Ilahiyat Fakultesi Dergisi 57 (2):69-96.
    Creation or becoming as a philosophical and theological problem has always been one of the main controversial issues of philosophers and theologians. It is sometimes defended that creation is an instant act or event; sometimes it is thought that creation is a process without a beginning. In this article, the approaches of Ibn Arabī and Ibn Taymiyya to the issue of creation are examined and compared. These two scholars mainly advocate that it is not possible for creation to begin at (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
Creation, Misc
  1. Semiclassical Theism and the Passage of Planck Times.James Goetz - 2016 - Theology and Science 14 (3):325–339.
    This paper models God and time in the framework of modern physics. God bridges and simultaneously exists in (1) a universe with infinite tenseless time and (2) a created parallel universe with tensed time and a point origin. The primary attributes of God are inexhaustible love, inexhaustible perception, and inexhaustible force. The model also incorporates modern physics theories that include relativity, the conservation of energy, quantum mechanics, and multiverse geometry. For example, creation out of nothing and divine intervention are subject (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Divine Knowledge and Qualitative Indiscernibility.Daniel S. Murphy - 2016 - Faith and Philosophy 33 (1):25-47.
    This paper is about the nature of God’s pre-creation knowledge of possible creatures. I distinguish three theories: non-qualitative singularism, qualitative singularism, and qualitative generalism, which differ in terms of whether the relevant knowledge is qualitative or non-qualitative, and whether God has singular or merely general knowledge of creatures. My main aim is to argue that qualitative singularism does not depend on a version of the Principle of Identity of Indiscernibles to the effect that, necessarily, qualitatively indiscernible individuals are identical. It (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. On The Necessity Of The Best (Possible) World.Lloyd Strickland - 2005 - Ars Disputandi 5.
    Many have argued that if God exists then he must necessarily create the best possible world , which entails that the bpw necessarily exists, and is therefore the only possible world. But without any scope for comparison, the superlative term ‘best’ is clearly inappropriate and so the bpw cannot be the bpw at all! As such, it must be impossible for God to create it. Hence if God exists then he must of necessity make something that is impossible to create! (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Best of Possible Worlds: A Testable Claim of Choice.William C. Lane - 2006 - Theology and Science 4 (3):261-278.
    Leibniz said that the universe, if God-created, would exist at a unique, conjoint, physical maximum: Of all possible worlds, it would be richest in phenomena, but its richness would arise from the simplest physical laws and initial conditions. Using concepts of ‘‘variety’’ and algorithmic informational complexity, Leibniz’ claim can be reframed as a testable theory. This theory predicts that the laws and conditions of the actual universe should be simpler, and the universe richer in phenomena, than the presence of observers (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Persistence and Divine Conservation.David Vander Laan - 2006 - Religious Studies 42 (2):159-176.
    Plausibly, if an object persists through time, then its later existence must be caused by its earlier existence. Many theists endorse a theory of continuous creation, according to which God is the sole cause of a creature's existence at a given time. The conjunction of these two theses rather unfortunately implies that no object distinct from God persists at all. What strategies for resolving this difficulty are available? (Published Online April 7 2006).
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6. Leibniz's Best World Claim Restructured.William C. Lane - 2010 - American Philosophical Quarterly 47 (1):57-84.
    Leibniz claimed that the universe, if God-created, would be physically and morally optimal in this conjoint sense: Of all possible worlds, it would be richest in phenomena, but its richness would arise from the simplest physical laws and conditions. This claim raises two difficult questions. First, why would this “richest/simplest” world be morally optimal? Second, what is the optimal balance between these competing criteria? The latter question is especially hard to answer in the context of a multiverse or multi-domain universe. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. The Question of the Existence of God in the Book of Stephen Hawking: A Brief History of Time.Alfred Driessen - 1997 - In Alfred Driessen & Antoine Suarez (eds.), Mathematical undecidability, quantum nonlocality, and the question of the existence of God. Springer.
    The continuing interest in the book of S. Hawking "A Brief History of Time" makes a philosophical evaluation of the content highly desirable. As will be shown, the genre of this work can be identified as a speciality in philosophy, namely the proof of the existence of God. In this study an attempt is given to unveil the philosophical concepts and steps that lead to the final conclusions, without discussing in detail the remarkable review of modern physical theories. In order (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Review of Yves Tourenne, Introduction À la Métaphysique de Claude Tresmontant. Pour Une Recherche d'Articulation Entre Sciences Expérimentales, Métaphysique, Pensée de l'Église Et Mystique Chrétienne Orthodoxe. [REVIEW]Philippe Gagnon - 2012 - Science Et Esprit 64 (2):304-309.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Temporalité de la Genèse Chez Maurice Blondel Et Pierre Teilhard de Chardin. Esquisse D’Un Rapprochement.Philippe Gagnon - 2002 - Science Et Esprit 54 (1):75-95.
    Teilhard has never given up on permanence behind change, whereas Blondel, although interested by permanence, presents a very keen consciousness of irreversibility. Blondel attempts to construct an ontology that integrates this fact of change or becoming. Would this have satisfied Teilhard? Blondel develops a "logic of moral life" insisting on the initial option right to the end of our destiny. Teilhard develops a consciousness of time with a direct hold on a world apprehended first by the senses, whereas Blondel is (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Malebranche Et Berkeley: Les Créatures Et les Raisons Éternelles.Philippe Gagnon - 2003 - Bulletin de la Société de Philosophie du Québec 29 (2):15-16.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Physics in Catholicism in Encyclopedia of Sciences and Religions, Vol 3. Anne Runehov and Lluis Oviedo (Eds.) (Pp. 1718-1729).Philippe Gagnon - 2013 - In Anne L. C. Runehov & Luis Oviedo (eds.), Encyclopedia of Sciences and Religions, Vol 3. Dordrecht, Pays-Bas: Springer. pp. 1718-1729.
    Outline: The reality of Catholicism; The question of the development of science; Historical outlook at some transitional moments; When dogma meets science; Contemporary physics and the worldview of Catholicism; Awaiting a 'Grand Narrative' and the final vision of harmony.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. How Process Theology Can Affirm Creation Ex Nihilo.Rem B. Edwards - 2000 - Process Studies 29 (1):77-96.
    Most process theologians have rejected the creation of the world out of nothing, holding that our universe was created out of some antecedent universe. This article shows how on process grounds, and with faithfulness to much of what Whitehead had to say, process theologians can and should affirm the creation of our universe out of nothing. Standard process objections to this are refuted.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Ontology and Providence in Creation: Taking Ex Nihilo Seriously.Mark Ian Thomas Robson - 2008 - Continuum.
    My concern is to overturn the Leibnizean model of God's creation of the world which proposes that God selected a possible world out of a whole host of other alternative ones. This is the familiar possible worlds model of creation. I argue that this understanding of creation does not take seriously the idea of ex nihilo and that, rather than considering determinate possible worlds, we should understand possibility as indeterminate. I then develop this argument and explores how it impacts on (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Divine Temporality and Creation Ex Nihilo.Thomas D. Senor - 1993 - Faith and Philosophy 10 (1):86-92.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15. Colonizing the Galaxies.Graham Oppy - 2000 - Sophia 39 (2):117-142.
    Paper presented in East-West Symposium on Science, Philosophy and Religion, Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy Meeting with Australasian Association of Philosophy Annual Conference, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, July 1999.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16. Determining the Best of All Possible Worlds.Lloyd Strickland - 2005 - Journal of Value Inquiry 39 (1):37-47.
    The concept of the best of all possible worlds is widely considered to be incoherent on the grounds that, for any world that might be termed the best, there is always another that is better. I note that underlying this argument is a conviction that the goodness of a world is determined by a single kind of good, the most plausible candidates for which are not maximizable. Against this I suggest that several goods may have to combine to determine the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. God's Problem of Multiple Choice.Lloyd Strickland - 2006 - Religious Studies 42 (2):141-157.
    A question that has been largely overlooked by philosophers of religion is how God would be able to effect a rational choice between two worlds of unsurpassable goodness. To answer this question, I draw a parallel with the paradigm cases of indifferent choice, including Buridan's ass, and argue that such cases can be satisfactorily resolved provided that the protagonists employ what Otto Neurath calls an ‘auxiliary motive’. I supply rational grounds for the employment of such a motive, and then argue (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations