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  1. Ethics of Consumption: The Good Life, Justice, and Global Stewardship.David A. Crocker & Toby Linden (eds.) - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this comprehensive collection of essays, most of which appear for the first time, eminent scholars from many disciplines—philosophy, economics, sociology, political science, demography, theology, history, and social psychology—examine the causes, nature, and consequences of present-day consumption patterns in the United States and throughout the world.
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  • Fairness in Trade II: Export Subsidies and the Fair Trade Movement.Malgorzata Kurjanska & Mathias Risse - 2008 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 7 (1):29-56.
    Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, USA, mathias_risse{at}ksg.harvard.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> It is a widespread view that support for Fair Trade is called for, whereas agricultural subsidies are pegged as unjustifiable. Though one supports farmers in developing countries while the other does the same for those in already developed ones, there are, nonetheless, similarities between both scenarios. Both are economically `inefficient', upholding production beyond what the market would sustain. In both cases, supportive arguments (...)
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  • Fairness in Trade I: Obligations From Trading and the Pauper-Labor Argument.Mathias Risse - 2007 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 6 (3):355-377.
    Standard economic theory teaches that trade benefits all countries involved, at least in the long run. While there are other reasons for trade liberalization, this insight, going back to Ricardo's 1817 Principles of Political Economy , continues to underlie international economics. Trade also raises fairness questions. First, suppose A trades with B while parts of A's population are oppressed. Do the oppressed in A have a complaint in fairness against B? Should B cease to trade? Second, suppose because of oppression (...)
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  • The Benefits of Cooperation.Joseph Heath - 2006 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (4):313-351.
    There is an idea, extremely common among social contract theorists, that the primary function of social institutions is to secure some form of cooperative benefit. If individuals simply seek to satisfy their own preferences in a narrowly instrumental fashion, they will find themselves embroiled in collective action problems – interactions with an outcome that is worse for everyone involved than some other possible outcome. Thus they have reason to accept some form of constraint over their conduct, in order to achieve (...)
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  • The Market, Competition, and Equality.Peter Dietsch - 2010 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 9 (2):213-244.
    How much inequality does market interaction generate? The answer to this question partly depends on the level of competition among economic agents. Yet, in their normative analysis of the market, theories of distributive justice focus on individual characteristics such as talents as determinants of income, and tend to ignore structural features such as competition. Economists, on the other hand, dispose of the conceptual tools to assess the distributive impact of competition, but their analysis is usually limited to allocative efficiency. Part (...)
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  • The Status Struggle. A Recognition-Based Interpretation of the Positional Economy.Rutger Claassen - 2008 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (9):1021-1049.
    Competition for positional goods is an important feature of contemporary consumer societies. This paper discusses three strategies for a normative evaluation of positional competition. First, it criticizes an evaluation in terms of people's motives to engage in such competition. A reconstruction of an American debate over the status-motivation of consumer behavior shows how such an analysis founders on the difficulties of distinguishing between status and non-status motives for consumption. Second, the article criticizes an approach based on assessing the (positive and (...)
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  • Freedom in the Market.Philip Pettit - 2006 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (2):131-149.
    The market is traditionally hailed as the very exemplar of a system under which people enjoy freedom, in particular the negative sort of freedom associated with liberal and libertarian thought: freedom as noninterference. But how does the market appear from the perspective of a rival conception of freedom (freedom as non-domination) that is linked with the Roman and neo-Roman tradition of republicanism? The republican conception of freedom argues for important normative constraints on property, exchange, and regulation, without supporting extremes to (...)
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  • Principles of Political Economy with Some of Their Applications to Social Philosophy.John Stuart Mill (ed.) - 2004 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    Stephen Nathanson's clear-sighted abridgment of _Principles of Political Economy_, Mill's first major work in moral and political philosophy, provides a challenging, sometimes surprising account of Mill's views on many important topics: socialism, population, the status of women, the cultural bases of economic productivity, the causes and possible cures of poverty, the nature of property rights, taxation, and the legitimate functions of government. Nathanson cuts through the dated and less relevant sections of this large work and includes significant material omitted in (...)
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  • Illiberal Libertarians: Why Libertarianism Is Not a Liberal View.Samuel Freeman - 2001 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 30 (2):105-151.
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  • The Theory of Moral Sentiments.Adam Smith - 1759 - Dover Publications.
    The foundation for a system of morals, this 1749 work is a landmark of moral and political thought. Its highly original theories of conscience, moral judgment, and virtue offer a reconstruction of the Enlightenment concept of social science, embracing both political economy and theories of law and government.
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  • Rawls, Responsibility, and Distributive Justice.Richard Arneson - manuscript
    The theory of justice pioneered by John Rawls explores a simple idea--that the concern of distributive justice is to compensate individuals for misfortune. Some people are blessed with good luck, some are cursed with bad luck, and it is the responsibility of society--all of us regarded collectively--to alter the distribution of goods and evils that arises from the jumble of lotteries that constitutes human life as we know it. Some are lucky to be born wealthy, or into a favorable socializing (...)
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  • Is Liberal Society a Parasite on Tradition?Samuel Bowles - 2011 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 39 (1):46-81.
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  • Market Economies and Market Societies.Frank Cunningham - 2005 - Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (2):129–142.
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  • Capitalism and Freedom.Milton Friedman - 1962 - Ethics 74 (1):70-72.
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  • The Case Against Privatization.Avihay Dorfman & Alon Harel - 2013 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 41 (1):67-102.
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  • Is Ethical Consumerism an Impermissible Form of Vigilantism?Waheed Hussain - 2012 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 40 (2):111-143.
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  • Catching Capital: The Ethics of Tax Competition.Peter Dietsch (ed.) - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Rich people stash away trillions of dollars in tax havens like Switzerland, the Cayman Islands, or Singapore. Multinational corporations shift their profits to low-tax jurisdictions like Ireland or Panama to avoid paying tax. Recent stories in the media about Apple, Google, Starbucks, and Fiat are just the tip of the iceberg. There is hardly any multinational today that respects not just the letter but also the spirit of tax laws. All this becomes possible due to tax competition, with countries strategically (...)
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  • Libertarianism Without Inequality.Michael Otsuka - 2003 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Michael Otsuka sets out to vindicate left-libertarianism, a political philosophy which combines stringent rights of control over one's own mind, body, and life with egalitarian rights of ownership of the world. Otsuka reclaims the ideas of John Locke from the libertarian Right, and shows how his Second Treatise of Government provides the theoretical foundations for a left-libertarianism which is both more libertarian and more egalitarian than the Kantian liberal theories of John Rawls and Thomas Nagel. Otsuka's libertarianism is founded on (...)
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  • Whose Body is It Anyway?: Justice and the Integrity of the Person.Cécile Fabre - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Do we have the right to deny others access to our body? What if this would harm those who need personal services or body parts from us? Ccile Fabre examines the impact that arguments for distributive justice have on the rights we have over ourselves, and on such contentious issues as organ sales, prostitution, and surrogate motherhood.
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  • Alienation.Rahel Jaeggi - 2014 - Columbia University Press.
    In this book Jaeggi draws on phenomenological analyses grounded in modern conceptions of agency, along with recent work in the analytical tradition, to reconceive of alienation as the absence of a meaningful relationship to oneself and ...
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  • Justice Beyond Borders: A Global Political Theory.Simon Caney - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Which political principles should govern global politics? In his new book, Simon Caney engages with the work of philosophers, political theorists, and international relations scholars in order to examine some of the most pressing global issues of our time. Are there universal civil, political, and economic human rights? Should there be a system of supra- state institutions? Can humanitarian intervention be justified?
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  • Buyer Beware: A Critique of Leading Virtue Ethics Defenses of Markets.Roberto Fumagalli - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (3):457-482.
    Over the last few decades, there have been intense debates concerning the effects of markets on the morality of individuals’ behaviour. On the one hand, several authors argue that markets’ ongoing expansion tends to undermine individuals’ intentions for mutual benefit and virtuous character traits and actions. On the other hand, leading economists and philosophers characterize markets as a domain of intentional cooperation for mutual benefit that promotes many of the character traits and actions that traditional virtue ethics accounts classify as (...)
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  • Workplace Democracy Implies Economic Democracy.Nicholas Vrousalis - 2019 - Journal of Social Philosophy 50 (3):259-279.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  • Egalitarians and the Market: Dangerous Ideals.Anne Phillips - 2008 - Social Theory and Practice 34 (3):439-462.
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  • Distributive Justice Without Sovereign Rule: The Case of Trade.Aaron James - 2005 - Social Theory and Practice 31 (4):533-559.
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  • Practices, Firms and Varieties of Capitalism.Russell Keat - 2008 - Philosophy of Management 7 (1):77-91.
    Against MacIntyre’s view that capitalism is incompatible with the conduct of economic production as a genuine practice, this paper claims that capitalist economies take a number of institutionally distinct forms, and that these differ significantly in the extent to which, and the reasons for which, they are antithetical to production as a practice. Drawing on the extensive literature in comparative political economy on varieties of capitalism, it argues that while ‘Liberal’ Market Economies such as the USA and UK conform quite (...)
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  • Pitting People Against Each Other.Waheed Hussain - 2020 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 48 (1):79-113.
    Philosophy &Public Affairs, Volume 48, Issue 1, Page 79-113, Winter 2020.
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  • Animal Spirits: How Human Psychology Drives the Economy, and Why It Matters for Global Capitalism.George A. Akerlof & Robert J. Shiller - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    "This book is a sorely needed corrective. Animal Spirits is an important--maybe even a decisive--contribution at a difficult juncture in macroeconomic theory.
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  • Self-Ownership, Freedom, and Equality.G. A. Cohen - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book G. A. Cohen examines the libertarian principle of self-ownership, which says that each person belongs to himself and therefore owes no service or product to anyone else. This principle is used to defend capitalist inequality, which is said to reflect each person's freedom to do as as he wishes with himself. The author argues that self-ownership cannot deliver the freedom it promises to secure, thereby undermining the idea that lovers of freedom should embrace capitalism and the inequality (...)
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  • The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money.John Maynard Keynes - 1936 - Macmillan.
    Although Considered By A Few Critics That The Sentence Structures Of The Book Are Quite Incomprehensible And Almost Unbearable To Read, The Book Is An Essential ...
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  • Business Ethics and (or as) Political Philosophy.Joseph Heath, Jeffrey Moriarty & Wayne Norman - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):427-452.
    There is considerable overlap between the interests of business ethicists and those of political philosophers. Questions about the moral justifiability of the capitalist system, the basis of property rights, and the problem of inequality in the distribution of income have been of central importance in both fields. However, political philosophers have developed, especially over the past four decades, a set of tools and concepts for addressing these questions that are in many ways quite distinctive. Most business ethicists, on the other (...)
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  • Equality, Priority, and Positional Goods.Harry Brighouse & Adam Swift - 2006 - Ethics 116 (3):471-497.
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  • Liberty, Desert and the Market: A Philosophical Study.Serena Olsaretti - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Are inequalities of income created by the free market just? In this book Serena Olsaretti examines two main arguments that justify those inequalities: the first claims that they are just because they are deserved, and the second claims that they are just because they are what free individuals are entitled to. Both these arguments purport to show, in different ways, that giving responsible individuals their due requires that free market inequalities in incomes be allowed. Olsaretti argues, however, that neither argument (...)
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  • An Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations.Adam Smith - unknown
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  • Morality, Competition, and the Firm: The Market Failures Approach to Business Ethics.Joseph Heath (ed.) - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    In four new and nine previously published essays, Joseph Heath provides a compelling new framework for thinking about the moral obligations of economic actors. The "market failures" approach to business ethics that he develops provides the basis for a unified theory of business ethics, corporate law, economic regulation, and the welfare state.
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  • Anarchy, State, and Utopia.Robert Nozick - 1974 - Basic Books.
    Winner of the 1975 National Book Award, this brilliant and widely acclaimed book is a powerful philosophical challenge to the most widely held political and social positions of our age--liberal, socialist, and conservative.
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  • On the Origin, Content, and Relevance of the Market Failures Approach.Jeffrey Moriarty - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 165 (1):113-124.
    The view of business ethics that Christopher McMahon calls the “implicit morality of the market” and Joseph Heath calls the “market failures approach” has received a significant amount of recent attention. The idea of this view is that we can derive an ethics for market participants by thinking about the “point” of market activity, and asking what the world would have to be like for this point to be realized. While this view has been much-discussed, it is still not well-understood. (...)
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  • The Myth of Ownership: Taxes and Justice.Liam Murphy & Thomas Nagel - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    In a capitalist economy, taxes are the most important instrument by which the political system puts into practice a conception of economic and distributive justice. Taxes arouse strong passions, fueled not only by conflicts of economic self-interest, but by conflicting ideas of fairness. Taking as a guiding principle the conventional nature of private property, Murphy and Nagel show how taxes can only be evaluated as part of the overall system of property rights that they help to create. Justice or injustice (...)
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  • Do Markets Corrupt Our Morals?Virgil Henry Storr & Ginny Seung Choi - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    The most damning criticism of markets is that they are morally corrupting. As we increasingly engage in market activity, the more likely we are to become selfish, corrupt, rapacious and debased. Even Adam Smith, who famously celebrated markets, believed that there were moral costs associated with life in market societies. This book explores whether or not engaging in market activities is morally corrupting. Storr and Choi demonstrate that people in market societies are wealthier, healthier, happier and better connected than those (...)
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  • Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives.Elizabeth Anderson - 2017 - Princeton University Press.
    Why our workplaces are authoritarian private governments—and why we can’t see it One in four American workers says their workplace is a “dictatorship.” Yet that number almost certainly would be higher if we recognized employers for what they are—private governments with sweeping authoritarian power over our lives. Many employers minutely regulate workers’ speech, clothing, and manners on the job, and employers often extend their authority to the off-duty lives of workers, who can be fired for their political speech, recreational activities, (...)
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  • Philosophy of Right.G. W. F. Hegel - 1967 - Oup Usa.
    Among the most influential parts of the philosophy of G.W.F. Hegel (1770-1831) were his ethics, his theory of the state, and his philosophy of history. The Philosophy of Right (Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts) (1821), the last work published in Hegel's lifetime, is a combined system of moral and political philosophy, or a sociology dominated by the idea of the state. Here Hegel repudiates his earlier assessment of the French Revolution as a "a marvelous sunrise" in the realization of liberty. (...)
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  • Trade Justice.James Christensen - 2017 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    The international trading system remains a locus of fierce social conflict. The protesters who besiege gatherings of its managers—most famously on the streets of Seattle at the turn of the millennium—regard it with suspicion and hostility, as a threat to their livelihoods, an enemy of global justice, and their grievances are exploited by populist statesmen peddling their own mercantilist agendas. If we are to support the trading system, we must first assure ourselves that it can withstand moral scrutiny. We must (...)
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  • Just Financial Markets?: Finance in a Just Society.Lisa Herzog (ed.) - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume brings together leading scholars from political theory, law, and economics in order to discuss the relationship between financial markets and justice, and invites us to rethink the place and role of financial markets in our societies.
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  • Participation and Democratic Theory.Carole Pateman - 1975 - Cambridge University Press.
    Shows that current elitist theories are based on an inadequate understanding of the early writings of democratic theory and that much sociological evidence has been ignored.
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  • The Invention of Market Freedom.Eric MacGilvray (ed.) - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    How did the value of freedom become so closely associated with the institution of the market? Why did the idea of market freedom hold so little appeal before the modern period and how can we explain its rise to dominance? In The Invention of Market Freedom, Eric MacGilvray addresses these questions by contrasting the market conception of freedom with the republican view that it displaced. After analyzing the ethical core and exploring the conceptual complexity of republican freedom, MacGilvray shows how (...)
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  • Our Bodies, Whose Property?Anne Phillips - 2013 - Princeton University Press.
    An argument against treating our bodies as commodities No one wants to be treated like an object, regarded as an item of property, or put up for sale. Yet many people frame personal autonomy in terms of self-ownership, representing themselves as property owners with the right to do as they wish with their bodies. Others do not use the language of property, but are similarly insistent on the rights of free individuals to decide for themselves whether to engage in commercial (...)
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  • Markets Without Limits: Moral Virtues and Commercial Interests.Jason F. Brennan & Peter Jaworski - 2015 - Routledge.
    May you sell your vote? May you sell your kidney? May gay men pay surrogates to bear them children? May spouses pay each other to watch the kids, do the dishes, or have sex? Should we allow the rich to genetically engineer gifted, beautiful children? Should we allow betting markets on terrorist attacks and natural disasters? Most people shudder at the thought. To put some goods and services for sale offends human dignity. If everything is commodified , then nothing is (...)
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  • Real Freedom for All: What (If Anything) Can Justify Capitalism?Philippe Van Parijs - 1995 - Oxford University Press.
    Capitalist societies are full of unacceptable inequalities. Freedom is of paramount importance. These two convictions, widely shared around the world, seem to be in direct contradiction with each other. Fighting inequality jeopardizes freedom, and taking freedom seriously boosts inequality. Can this conflict be resolved? In this ground-breaking book, Philippe Van Parijs sets a new and compelling case for a just society. Assessing and rejecting the claims of both socialism and conventional capitalism, he presents a clear and compelling alternative vision of (...)
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  • On Economic Inequality.Amartya Sen - 1997 - Clarendon Press.
    Based on the 1972 Radcliffe Lectures, this book presents a systematic treatment of the conceptual framework as well as the practical problems of measurement of inequality.
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  • Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets.Debra Satz - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    In Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale, philosopher Debra Satz takes a penetrating look at those commodity exchanges that strike most of us as problematic. What considerations, she asks, ought to guide the debates about such markets? What is it about a market involving prostitution or the sale of kidneys that makes it morally objectionable? How is a market in weapons or pollution different than a market in soybeans or automobiles? Are laws and social policies banning the more (...)
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