Results for 'England'

111 found
Order:
See also
Richard England
University of Toronto (PhD)
  1.  41
    Petition to Include Cephalopods as “Animals” Deserving of Humane Treatment Under the Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals.New England Anti-Vivisection Society, American Anti-Vivisection Society, The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, The Humane Society of the United States, Humane Society Legislative Fund, Jennifer Jacquet, Becca Franks, Judit Pungor, Jennifer Mather, Peter Godfrey-Smith, Lori Marino, Greg Barord, Carl Safina, Heather Browning & Walter Veit - forthcoming - Harvard Law School Animal Law and Policy Clinic:1–30.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2. China and England: On the Structural Convergence of Political Values. [REVIEW]Sandra Leonie Field - 2020 - Journal of World Philosophies 5 (1):188-195.
    At the centre of Powers' (2019) China and England is an extraordinary forgotten episode in the history of political ideas. There was a time when English radicals critiqued the corruption and injustice of the English political system by contrasting it with the superior example of China. There was a time when they advocated adopting a Chinese conceptual framework for thinking about politics. So dominant and prevalent was the English radicals' use of this framework, that their opponents took to dismissing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  26
    Heavenly Creatures? Visions of Animal Afterlife in Seventeenth-Century England.Lloyd Strickland - 2022 - Journal of Religious History, Literature, and Culture 1 (8):1-24.
    This article offers an extensive study of the idea of an animal afterlife in seventeenth-century England. While some have argued that the idea of an animal afterlife became prevalent at the time due to increased awareness of animals’ mental abilities, others have suggested it was due to greater sensitivity to animal suffering and the perceived need to square this suffering with divine justice. I show that both views are incorrect, and that seventeenth-century thinking about an animal afterlife was first (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Law Society of England and Wales Published a Recent 'Practice Note' on Criminal Prosecutions of Victims of Trafficking.Sally Ramage - forthcoming - Criminal Law News (88).
    The Law Society recently published a practice note titled 'Prosecutions of victims of trafficking'. This practice note comes many years after many lawyers had highlighted the problem and after the government machinery had chuntered into action and passed the UK Modern Slavery Act 2015 with explanatory notes and non-statutory guidelines for corporations. Since 2012 there had been issued warnings about the way defence lawyers, the Crown Prosecution Service and the UK police were dealing with trafficking and the Criminal Cases Review (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. “Now and in England:” Four Quartets, Place and Martin Heidegger’s Concept of Dwelling.Dominic Griffiths - 2012 - Yeats Eliot Review 29 (1/2):3-18.
    T.S. Eliot’s Four Quartets is foremost a meditation on the significance of place. Each quartet is named for a place which holds importance for Eliot, either because of historical or personal memory. I argue that this importance is grounded in an ontological topology, by which I mean that the poem explores the fate of the individual and his/her heritage as inextricably bound up with the notion of place. This sense of place extends beyond the borders of a single life to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  80
    The Reception of the Theodicy in England.Lloyd Strickland - 2016 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), Leibniz, Caroline und die Folgen der englischen Sukzession. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag. pp. 69-91.
    Leibniz wished that his Theodicy (1710) would have as great and as wide an impact as possible, and to further this end we find him in his correspondence with Caroline often expressing his desire that the book be translated into English. Despite his wishes, and Caroline’s efforts, this was not to happen in his lifetime (indeed, it did not happen until 1951, almost 250 years after Leibniz’s death). But even though the Theodicy did not make quite the impact in (...) that Leibniz had hoped it would, it did draw some attention from the English intelligentsia. In this paper I shall focus on two responses to the Theodicy that were made in England in the years immediately following its publication. First, I shall consider the response of Michel de la Roche and his efforts to promote the book to an English audience in 1711 (efforts which only came to Leibniz’s attention much later, in 1713). De la Roche’s response was broadly positive, though his admiration for the Theodicy was tempered by his belief that Leibniz had struggled – unsuccessfully – to reconcile free will with divine foreknowledge. Second, I shall consider the largely negative response of George Smalridge, the Bishop of Bristol, who delivered his verdict on the book in a letter to Sophie written in 1714. Leibniz subsequently wrote a point-by-point rebuttal of (most of) Smalridge’s criticisms in a letter to Caroline, conceding only one very minor point to the Bishop. As we shall see, some of the points of substance raised by de la Roche and Smalridge have loomed over the Theodicy ever since. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Women on Liberty in Early Modern England.Jacqueline Broad - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (2):112-122.
    Our modern ideals about liberty were forged in the great political and philosophical debates of the 17th and 18th centuries, but we seldom hear about women's contributions to those debates. This paper examines the ideas of early modern English women – namely Margaret Cavendish, Mary Astell, Mary Overton, ‘Eugenia’, Sarah Chapone and the civil war women petitioners – with respect to the classic political concepts of negative, positive and republican liberty. The author suggests that these writers' woman-centred concerns provide a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8. Religion and Enlightenment in Eighteenth-Century England: Theological Debate From Locke to Burke.B. W. Young - 1998 - Clarendon Press.
    This is a description and analysis of the intellectual culture of the eighteenth-century Church of England. Challenging conventional perceptions of the Church as an intellectually moribund institution, the study traces the influence of thinkers such as Locke, Newton, Burke, and Gibbon on theological debate in England during this period.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Die Philosophie des 17. Jahrhunderts. Volume 3: England by Jean-Pierre Schobinger. [REVIEW]Gary Hatfield - 1992 - Isis 83 (1):126-128.
    Review of: Jean-Pierre Schobinger (Editor). Die Philosophie des 17. Jahrhunderts. Volume 3: England. 2 half-volumes. xxxiv + 874 pp., bibls., index. Basel: Schwabe, 1988. SFr 160, DM 195.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  81
    Richard Kroll, Richard Ashcraft and Perez Zagorin (eds.), Philosophy, Science and Religion in England, 1640-1700 (Cambridge-New York-Port Chester : Cambridge Univ. Press, 1992). [REVIEW]Francoise Monnoyeur - 1993 - Revue D Histoire des Sciences 47 (1):149-150.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Traumatic Brain Injury with Personality Change: A Challenge to Mental Capacity Law in England and Wales.Demian Whiting - 2020 - Psychological Injury and Law 13 (1):11-18.
    It is well documented that people with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) can undergo personality changes, including becoming more impulsive in terms of how they behave. Legal guidance and academic commentary support the view that impulsiveness can render someone decisionally incompetent as defined by English and Welsh law. However, impulsiveness is a trait found within the healthy population. Arguably, impulsiveness is also a trait that gives rise to behaviours that should normally be tolerated even when they cause harm to the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Vitalistic Approaches to Life in Early Modern England.Veronika Szanto - 2015 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 37 (2):209-230.
    Vitalism has been given different definitions and diverse figures have been labelled as vitalists throughout the history of ideas. Concentrating on the seventeenth century, we find that scholars identify as vitalists authors who endorse notions that are in diametrical opposition with each other. I briefly present the ideas of dualist vitalists and monist vitalists and the philosophical and theological considerations informing their thought. In all these varied forms of vitalism the identifiable common motives are the essential irreducibility of life and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. Regula Socratis: The Rediscovery of Ancient Induction in Early Modern England.John P. McCaskey - 2006 - Dissertation, Stanford University
    A revisionist account of how philosophical induction was conceived in the ancient world and how that conception was transmitted, altered, and then rediscovered. I show how philosophers of late antiquity and then the medieval period came step-by-step to seriously misunderstand Aristotle’s view of induction and how that mistake was reversed by humanists in the Renaissance and then especially by Francis Bacon. I show, naturally enough then, that in early modern science, Baconians were Aristotelians and Aristotelians were Baconians.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14. Review: Miles Hollingworth, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Oxford, England: Oxford University Press , October 2018. 304 Pages. $34.95. Hardcover. ISBN 9780190873998. [REVIEW]Thomas D. Carroll - 2019 - Reading Religion.
    This is a review of Miles Hollingworth's recent intellectual biography of Wittgenstein.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. David Hume and the Common Law of England.Neil McArthur - 2005 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 3 (1):67-82.
    David Hume’s legal theory has normally been interpreted as bearing close affinities to the English common law theory of jurisprudence. I argue that this is not accurate. For Hume, it is the nature and functioning of a country’s legal system, not the provenance of that system, that provides the foundation of its authority. He judges government by its ability to protect property in a reliable and equitable way. His positions on the role of equity in the law, on artificial reason (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  50
    Richard Kroll, Richard Ashcraft and Perez Zagorin , Philosophy, Science and Religion in England, 1640-1700.Jan W. Wojcik - 1994 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 47 (1):149-150.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  34
    DS Katz, Sabbath and Sectarianism in Seventeenth-Century England[REVIEW]Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1991 - Cristianesimo Nella Storia 12 (2):442-443.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Bernard Barber, Intellectual Pursuits: Toward an Understanding of Culture. Lanham MD & Oxford, England 1998: Rowman and Littlefield. ISBN 0847688607. [REVIEW]Bruce C. Wearne - 2002 - Philosophia Reformata 67 (2):194-196.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. An ‘Anti-Utopian Age?’: Isaiah Berlin’s England, Hannah Arendt’s America, and Utopian Thinking in Dark Times.Kei Hiruta - 2017 - Journal of Political Ideologies 22 (1):12-29.
    This essay challenges the influential view that Isaiah Berlin and Hannah Arendt played a central role in inaugurating an ‘anti-utopian age’. While the two thinkers certainly did their share to discredit the radical utopian inclination to portray a political blueprint in the abstract, I show that neither was straightforwardly anti-utopian. On the contrary, both thinkers’ writings display a different kind of utopian thinking, consisting in an imaginative and idealized reconstruction of existing polities. Schematically put, Berlin’s utopia was England reconstructed (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Gendering the Quixote in Eighteenth-Century England.Amelia Dale - 2017 - Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture 46:5-19.
    English interpretations, appropriations, and transpositions of the figure of Don Quixote play a pivotal role in eighteenth-century constructions of so-called English national character. A corpus of quixotic narratives worked to reinforce the centrality of Don Quixote and the practice of quixotism in the national literary landscape. They stressed the man from La Mancha’s eccentricity and melancholy in ways inextricable from English self-constructions of these traits.2 This is why Stuart Tave is able to write that eighteenth-century Britons could “recast” Don Quixote (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  48
    Konzeptuelle Kunst in Amerika Und England Zwischen 1963 Und 1976.Thomas Dreher - 1988 - Dissertation, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität
    The core of the Conceptual artists (Mel Bochner, Sol LeWitt; the Siegelaub group with Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth, Lawrence Weiner; English and American members of Art and Language) is situated in the art context of the late sixties and the first half of the seventies. The self-positioning of the Conceptual artists within the art world in texts dealing with art theoretical as well as institutional problems is outlined, and selected works are interpreted.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. The Relevance of Pusey’s Eirenicon Today: Intercommunion Between Anglicans and Roman Catholics.Emmanuel Orok Duke - 2017 - Lwati: A Journal of Contemporary Research 14 (1).
    This paper investigates how Edward Pusey, a nineteenth century Anglican clergy and scholar responded to Edward Manning’s claim that the Church of England is not an authentic church. This led the former to write his Eirenicon, as an intellectual justification and a response to apostolicity and catholicity of the Anglican faith. Eirenicon is an example in rigorous dialogue on religious faith claims. The ecumenical rapprochement suggested by Pusey is very insightful: emphasis on the elements that unites Roman Catholics and (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. DR. [REVIEW]Sally Ramage - 2015 - Current Criminal Law 7 (4):1-14.
    Dido Belle was the illegitimate daughter of Captain Lindsay, the aristocratic nephew of William Murray, Scottish by birth and Lord Chief Justice of England for many decades. The book tells the story of Dido's life in Lord Mansfield homes, from the time her father begged Lord and Lady Mansfield to be wards of the child Dido to the death at age 88 of Lord Mansfield, mainly cared for by Dido and to Dido's young death at age 43. It also (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  12
    To What Extent Can Religious Education Help Shape Pupils’ Practical Wisdom?Jason Metcalfe - 2019 - Jubilee Centre Insight Series.
    In the Nichomachean Ethics, Aristotle outlines his thoughts about eudaimonia, a notion most accurately translated in English as “flourishing” or the idea of fulfilling our potential. For Aristotle, eudaimonia is “the activity of the soul in accord with reason or requiring reason” and must accord with virtues, the qualities of our character. -/- In the final chapter of the Nichomachean Ethics, Aristotle links eudaimonia with sophia (theoretical wisdom). For Aristotle, phronesis (practical wisdom) and sophia are two central intellectual virtues, whilst (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. What Schools Are for and Why.John White - 2007 - Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain IMPACT pamphlet No 14.
    In England and Wales we have had a National Curriculum since 1988. How can it have survived so long without aims to guide it? This IMPACT pamphlet argues that curriculum planning should begin not with a boxed set of academic subjects of a familiar sort, but with wider considerations of what schools should be for. We first work out a defensible set of wider aims backed by a well-argued rationale. From these we develop sub-aims constituting an aims-based curriculum. Further (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  26. On Denoting.Bertrand Russell - 1905 - Mind 14 (56):479-493.
    By a `denoting phrase' I mean a phrase such as any one of the following: a man, some man, any man, every man, all men, the present King of England, the present King of France, the center of mass of the solar system at the first instant of the twentieth century, the revolution of the earth round the sun, the revolution of the sun round the earth. Thus a phrase is denoting solely in virtue of its form. We may (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1080 citations  
  27. Compulsory Medical Intervention Versus External Constraint in Pandemic Control.Thomas Douglas, Lisa Forsberg & Jonathan Pugh - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics (12).
    Would compulsory treatment or vaccination for Covid-19 be justified? In England, there would be significant legal barriers to it. However, we offer a conditional ethical argument in favour of allowing compulsory treatment and vaccination, drawing on an ethical comparison with external constraints—such as quarantine, isolation and ‘lockdown’—that have already been authorised to control the pandemic. We argue that, if the permissive English approach to external constraints for Covid-19 has been justified, then there is a case for a similarly permissive (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28. Capturing and Promoting the Autonomy of Capacitous Vulnerable Adults.Jonathan Lewis - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):e21.
    According to the High Court in England and Wales, the primary purpose of legal interventions into the lives of vulnerable adults with mental capacity should be to allow the individuals concerned to regain their autonomy of decision making. However, recent cases of clinical decision making involving capacitous vulnerable adults have shown that, when it comes to medical law, medical ethics and clinical practice, vulnerability is typically conceived as opposed to autonomy. The first aim of this paper is to detail (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  71
    Clarke Against Spinoza on the Manifest Diversity of the World.Timothy Yenter - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):260-280.
    Samuel Clarke was one of Spinoza's earliest and fiercest opponents in England. I uncover three related Clarkean arguments against Spinoza's metaphysic that deserve more attention from readers today. Collectively, these arguments draw out a tension at the very heart of Spinoza's rationalist system. From the conjunction of a necessary being who acts necessarily and the principle of sufficient reason, Clarke reasons that there could be none of the diversity we find in the universe. In doing so, Clarke potentially reveals (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  30. Locke and William Molyneux.Ruth Boeker - 2021 - In Jessica Gordon-Roth & Shelley Weinberg (eds.), The Lockean Mind. Routledge.
    William Molyneux (1656–1698) was an Irish experimental philosopher and politician, who played a major role in the intellectual life in seventeenth-century Dublin. He became Locke’s friend and correspondent in 1692 and was probably Locke’s philosophically most significant correspondent. Locke approached Molyneux for advice for revising his Essay concerning Human Understanding as he was preparing the second and subsequent editions. Locke made several changes in response to Molyneux’s suggestions; they include major revisions of the chapter ‘Of Power’ (2.21), the addition of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  79
    What Hume Didn't Notice About Divine Causation.Timothy Yenter - 2022 - In Gregory Ganssle (ed.), Philosophical Essays on Divine Causation. New York, NY, USA: pp. 158-173.
    Hume’s criticisms of divine causation are insufficient because he does not respond to important philosophical positions that are defended by those whom he closely read. Hume’s arguments might work against the background of a Cartesian definition of body, or a Malebranchian conception of causation, or some defenses of occasionalism. At least, I will not here argue that they succeed or fail against those targets. Instead, I will lay out two major deficiencies in his arguments against divine causation. I call these (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Of Vikings and Nazis: Norwegian Contributions to the Rise and the Fall of the Idea of a Superior Aryan Race.Adam Hochman - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 54:84-88.
    Nazi ideology was premised on a belief in the superiority of the Germanic race. However, the idea of a superior Germanic race was not invented by the Nazis. By the beginning of the 20th century this idea had already gained not only popular but also mainstream scientific support in England, Germany, the U.S., Scandinavia, and other parts of the world in which people claimed Germanic origins (p. xiii). Yet how could this idea, which is now recognised as ideology of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33. Spongy Brains and Material Memories.John Sutton - 2007 - In Mary Floyd-Wilson & Garrett Sullivan (eds.), Embodiment and Environment in Early Modern England. Palgrave.
    Embodied human minds operate in and spread across a vast and uneven world of things—artifacts, technologies, and institutions which they have collectively constructed and maintained through cultural and individual history. This chapter seeks to add a historical dimension to the enthusiastically future-oriented study of “natural-born cyborgs” in the philosophy of cognitive science,3 and a cognitive dimension to recent work on material memories and symbol systems in early modern England, bringing humoral psychophysiology together with material culture studies. The aim is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  34. Decolonising Philosophy.Nelson Maldonado-Torres, Rafael Vizcaíno, Jasmine Wallace & Jeong Eun Annabel We - 2018 - In Gurminder K. Bhambra, Dalia Gebrial & Kerem Nişancıoğlu (eds.), Decolonising the University. London: Pluto Press. pp. 64-90.
    Based on Maldonado-Torres’s formulation of the term, we conceive the decolonial turn as a form of liberating and decolonising reason beyond the liberal and Enlightened emancipation of rationality, and beyond the more radical Euro-critiques that have failed to consistently challenge the legacies of Eurocentrism and white male heteronormativity (often Eurocentric critiques of Eurocentrism). We complement Maldonado-Torres’s account of the decolonial turn in philosophy, theory and critique by providing an analysis of the trajectories of academic philosophy and clarifying the relevance of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  60
    Equipoise, Standard of Care, and Consent: Responding to the Authorisation of New COVID-19 Treatments in Randomised Controlled Trials.Soren Holm, Jonathan Lewis & Rafael Dal-Ré - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics:1-6.
    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, large-scale research and pharmaceutical regulatory processes have proceeded at a dramatically increased pace with new and effective, evidence-based COVID-19 interventions rapidly making their way into the clinic. However, the swift generation of high-quality evidence and the efficient processing of regulatory authorisation have given rise to more specific and complex versions of well-known research ethics issues. In this paper, we identify three such issues by focusing on the authorisation of Molnupiravir, a novel antiviral medicine aimed (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. "A Great Championess for Her Sex": Sarah Chapone on Liberty as Nondomination and Self-Mastery.Jacqueline Broad - 2015 - The Monist 98 (1):77-88.
    This paper examines the concept of liberty at the heart of Sarah Chapone’s 1735 work, The Hardships of the English Laws in Relation to Wives. In this work, Chapone (1699-1764) advocates an ideal of freedom from domination that closely resembles the republican ideal in seventeenth and eighteenth- century England. This is the idea that an agent is free provided that no-one else has the power to dispose of that agent’s property—her “life, liberty, and limb” and her material possessions—according to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37. Universals and the Methodenstreit: A Re-Examination of Carl Menger's Conception of Economics as an Exact Science.Uskali Mäki - 1997 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 28 (3):475-495.
    In the latter half of the 19th century, economic thought in the Germanspeaking world was dominated, both intellectually and academically, by the so-called historical school, from Wilhelm Roscher to Gustav Schmoller and others. In 1871, the Austrian Carl Menger published his Grun&tze der Volkswirtschaftslehre (Menger, 1976 (1871)), customarily referred to as one of the three simultaneous discoveries of marginalist economics-the other two marginalist ‘revolutionaries’ being Jevons in England and Walras in France. Twelve years later, in 1883, Menger published a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  38.  6
    Lakatos and Lukács.László Ropolyi - 2002 - In G. Kampis, L.: Kvasz & M. Stöltzner (eds.), Appraising Lakatos: Mathematics, Methodology and the Man. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 303--337.
    Lakatos constructed his major contribution to the philosophy of science, the methodology of scientific research programmes (MSRP), in the late sixties and early seventies in England, after he had already become estranged from the Popperian philosophy of science. In this paper, we attempt to show that the MSRP was motivated by his philosophical and political ideas from the forties and fifties in Hungary, when he was imbued with the communist ideology and was influenced by the philosophy of Georg Lukács. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  39. Misleading Indexicals.Brian Weatherson - 2002 - Analysis 62 (4):308–310.
    In “Now the French are invading England” (Analysis 62, 2002, pp. 34-41), Komarine Romdenh-Romluc offers a new theory of the relationship between recorded indexicals and their content. Romdenh-Romluc’s proposes that Kaplan’s basic idea, that reference is determined by applying a rule to a context, is correct, but we have to be careful about what the context is, since it is not always the context of utterance. A few well known examples illustrate this. The “here” and “now” in “I am (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  40. Deep Brain Stimulation and Revising the Mental Health Act: The Case for Intervention-Specific Safeguards.Jonathan Pugh, Tipu Aziz, Jonathan Herring & Julian Savulescu - forthcoming - British Journal of Psychiatry.
    Under the current Mental Health Act of England and Wales, it is lawful to perform deep brain stimulation in the absence of consent and independent approval. We argue against the Care Quality Commission's preferred strategy of addressing this problematic issue, and offer recommendations for deep brain stimulation-specific provisions in a revised Mental Health Act.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  51
    The Relevance of Pusey’s Eirenicon Today: Intercommunion Between Anglicans and Roman Catholics.Emmanuel Orok Duke - 2017 - Lwati: A Journal of Contemporary Research 14 (1):pp.139-156.
    This paper investigates how Edward Pusey, a nineteenth century Anglican clergy and scholar responded to Edward Manning’s claim that the Church of England is not an authentic church. This led the former to write his Eirenicon, as an intellectual justification and a response to apostolicity and catholicity of the Anglican faith. Eirenicon is an example in rigorous dialogue on religious faith claims. The ecumenical rapprochement suggested by Pusey is very insightful: emphasis on the elements that unites Roman Catholics and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. Le scepticisme et les hypothèses de la physique.Sophie Roux - 1998 - Revue de Synthèse 119 (2-3):211-255.
    The History of scepticism from Erasmus to Spinoza is often called upon to support three theses: first, that Descartes had a dogmatic notion of systematic knowledge, and therefore of physics; second, that the hypothetical epistemology of physics which spread during the xviith century was the result of a general sceptical crisis; third, that this epistemology was more successful in England than in France. I reject these three theses: I point first to the tension in Descartes’ works between the ideal (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  43.  99
    Vietnam's Political Economy in Transition (1986-2016).Quan-Hoang Vuong - 2014 - Stratfor World View.
    The transition economy of Vietnam enjoyed remarkable achievements in the first 20 years of economic renovation (Doi Moi) from 1986 to 2006. Notably, the economy grew at an average annual rate of 7.5% in 1991-2000 period. Vietnam’s Amended Constitution 1992 recognized the role of private sector in the economy. U.S.-Vietnam Trade Bilateral Agreement (US-BTA) was signed in 2001. The country's stock market made debut trading in 2000. Vietnam became a member of Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in 1995, then (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44.  82
    Harmful Salience Perspectives.Ella Whiteley - 2022 - In Sophie Archer (ed.), Salience: A Philosophical Inquiry. Routledge. pp. Chapter 11.
    Consider a terrible situation that too many women find themselves in: 85,000 women are raped in England and Wales alone every year. Many of these women do not bring their cases to trial. There are multiple reasons that they might not want to testify in the courts. The incredibly low conviction rate is one. Another reason, however, might be that these women do not want the fact that they were raped to become the most salient thing about them. More (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  45. Hobbes, Heresy, and the Historia Ecclesiastica.Patricia Springborg - 1994 - Journal of the History of Ideas 55 (4):553-571.
    Thomas Hobbes's 'Historia Ecclesiastica' presents his views on religion and aims to divert the attention of the public from charges against his being a heretic to placing heresy in pagan history, claiming that Greek philosophers were responsible for introducing heresy in the Christian Church. His book reveals his interest in religious history and the growth of hermeticism and Cabalism in England in his age.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  46. Controlling the Passions: Passion, Memory, and the Moral Physiology of Self in Seventeenth-Century Neurophilosophy.John Sutton - 1998 - In S. Gaukroger (ed.), The Soft Underbelly of Reason: The Passions in the Seventeenth Century. Routledge. pp. 115-146.
    Some natural philosophers in the 17th century believed that they could control their own innards, specifically the animal spirits coursing incessantly through brain and nerves, in order to discipline or harness passion, cognition and action under rational guidance. This chapter addresses the mechanisms thought necessary after Eden for controlling the physiology of passion. The tragedy of human embedding in the body, with its cognitive and moral limitations, was paired with a sense of our confinement in sequential time. I use two (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47.  12
    Surprise Combined Studies: Something Learnt From Elmdon Anthropology.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    Do we learn anything from social anthropology done in more familiar settings, such as England? In this paper, I draw attention to something I learnt from Frances Oxford’s commentary on Elmdon: a surprising combination. I also propose a solution based on a conception of labour and inheritance rights.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  23
    R.K. N*R*Yan on Fake Chernobyl Poetry and Two Reasons for Pastiche.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    In this paper, I predict a reaction within the English literary world if Ukrainian poets head to England owing to war. I also identify two reasons for pastiche. I attempt to do so by means of a pastiche of a notable writer from the Indian sub-continent, for a version of one of these reasons.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Religion and the Failures of Determinism.John Sutton - 1991 - In S. Gaukroger (ed.), The Uses of Antiquity: the scientific revolution and the classical tradition. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 25-51.
    'Io trace a path from Pico della Mirandola's Renaissance man to the Jacobean malcontents of Marston or Webster is to document not an inflation of hopes for dominion over the natural world, but rather a loss of confidence in the possibility of control over even human affairs. 'For I am going into a wilderness, /Where I shall find nor path, nor friendly clew/To be my guide'.2 The bleak consequences of this lack of direction, leaving traces through into the Restoration period (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. Truth and Toleration in Early Modern Thought.Maria Rosa Antognazza - forthcoming - In Richard Whatmore & Ian Hunter (eds.), Natural Law and Politics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    The issue discussed in this paper is as topical today as it was in the early modern period. The Reformation presented with heightened urgency the question of how to relate the system of beliefs and values regarded as fundamental by an established political community to alternative beliefs and values introduced by new groups and individuals. Through a discussion of the views on toleration advanced by some key early modern thinkers, this paper will revisit different ways of addressing this problem, focusing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 111