Results for 'Grzegorczyk and his life and views'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  42
    On Life According to the Logic of Gift, Toil, and Challenges.Urszula Wybraniec-Skardowska - 2012 - Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 27 (40).
    The present essay deals with certain questions in the feld of humanistic philosophy, ethics and axiology, discussed in the light of still newer and newer challenges of our changing times. It highlights the signicant role of Professor Andrzej Grzegorczyk in solving and overcoming problems encountered in the life of man, which is based on his natural logic and incessant eorts aimed at preservation of fundamental moral values, as well as at shaping the principles of the individual and social (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  20
    The Enlightened Joseph Priestley: A Study of His Life and Work From 1773-1804. [REVIEW]Alan Tapper - 2008 - Enlightenment and Dissent 24:138-143.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. On the Philosophical Views of Werner Heisenberg and His Notion of a Closed Theory From the Later Wittgenstein's Perspective.Francois-Igor Pris - 2014 - AL-Mukhatabat 9.
    I interpret the philosophical views of Werner Heisenberg as a pragmatism and non-metaphysical realism of a Wittgensteinian kind. The “closed theory” is a Wittgensteinian rule/concept.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Canguilhem and the Logic of Life.Arantza Etxeberria & Charles T. Wolfe - 2018 - Transversal: International Journal for the Historiography of Science 4:47.
    In this paper we examine aspects of Canguilhem’s philosophy of biology, concerning the knowledge of life and its consequences on science and vitalism. His concept of life stems from the idea of a living individual, endowed with creative subjectivity and norms, a Kantian view which “disconcerts logic”. In contrast, two different approaches ground naturalistic perspectives to explore the logic of life and the logic of the living individual in the 1970s. Although Canguilhem is closer to the second, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Nietzsche on Realism in Art and the Role of Illusions in Life-Affirmation.Marie Kerguelen Le Blevennec - unknown
    In this paper, I investigate Nietzsche’s views about realism in art, and use the resulting textual evidence to explain the connection between realism, health and life-affirmation. First, I show that Nietzsche’s contrasting claims about artists like Flaubert and Stendhal reflect a distinction between two types of realism: the unhealthy realism of Flaubert, and the healthy realism of Stendhal. I then use this understanding of healthy realism in art to argue that for Nietzsche, healthy realism is vital for (...)-affirmation. Finally, I apply this evidence to a debate between Daniel Came and Bernard Reginster concerning whether Nietzsche thinks life-affirmation requires falsifying reality using illusions, especially artistic illusions, for the purpose of masking life’s terrible truths. Against Came, I argue that Nietzsche’s remarks about realism in art support Bernard Reginster’s claim that Nietzsche abandons his emphasis on illusion in The Birth of Tragedy in favor of tough-minded realism about life’s terrible truths. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  96
    Syed Abdul Malik: His Life and Works.Mahbubur Rahman - 2013 - Pratidhwani the Echo (II):04-07.
    Syed Abdul Malik (1919-2000) was an uncrowned emperor of Assamese literature. He started his literary career in the early forties and enriched Assamese literature with short stories, novels, poetry and other writings spanning over five decades. In terms of statistics of fictional work, Syed Abdul Malik was unrivalled. No other writer has contributed so extensively towards the growth of Assamese literature as he did. Malik’s contribution to Assamese literature, particularly in the sphere of novel and short story, is indeed noteworthy. (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  29
    Mulla Sadra: His Life and Works.Hossein Ziai - 1995. - In History of Islamic Philosophy. London: Routledge. pp. 635-641.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. On Dealing with Kant's Sexism and Racism.Pauline Kleingeld - 2019 - SGIR Review 2 (2):3-22.
    Kant is famous for his universalist moral theory, which emphasizes human dignity, equality, and autonomy. Yet he also defended sexist and (until late in his life) racist views. In this essay, I address the question of how current readers of Kant should deal with Kant’s sexism and racism. I first provide a brief description of Kant’s views on sexual and racial hierarchies, and of the way they intersect. I then turn to the question of whether we should (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Aristotle's Theory of Potentiality.Mohan Matthen - 2014 - In John P. Lizza (ed.), Potentiality: Metaphysical and Bioethical Dimensions. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 29-48.
    In this paper, I examine Aristotle's notion of potentiality as it applies to the beginning of life. Aristotle’s notion of natural kinēsis implies that we should not treat the entity at the beginning of embryonic development as human, or indeed as the same as the one that is born. This leads us to ask: When does the embryo turn into a human? Aristotle’s own answer to this question is very harsh. Bracketing the views that lead to this harsh (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. William James on Emotion and Morals.Guy Axtell - forthcoming - In Jacob Goodson (ed.), Cries of the Wounded: William James, Moral Philosophy, and the Moral Life. Rowman & Littlefield.
    The Emotions chapter (XXV) in James' Principles of Psychology traverses the entire range of experienced emotions from the “coarser” and more instinctual to the “subtler” emotions intimately involved in cognitive, moral, and aesthetic aspects of life. But Principles limits himself to an account of emotional consciousness and so there are few direct discussions in the text of Principles about what later came to be called moral psychology, and fewer about anything resembling philosophical ethics. Still, James’ short section on the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Postmodernism and Our Understanding of Science.Hennie Lotter - 1995 - In Deon Rossouw (ed.), Life in a postmodern culture. Human Sciences Research Council Press.
    Despite the flood of philosophical texts on postmodernism, relatively few attempts have been made to gauge the importance of postmodern ideas for the philosophy of science. However, Lyotard's enormously influential text The postmodern condition (1979) focussed on science and knowledge. He put the term metanarrative (grand narrative) into circulation. Lyotard defines the term modern to refer to the way in which science tries to legitimate its own status by means of philosophical discourse which appeal to some kind of grand narrative (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Brentano's Latter-Day Monism.Uriah Kriegel - 2016 - Brentano Studien 14:69-77.
    According to “existence monism,” there is only one concrete particular, the cosmos as a whole (Horgan and Potrč 2000, 2008). According to “priority monism,” there are many concrete particulars, but all are ontologically dependent upon the cosmos as a whole, which accordingly is the only fundamental concrete particular (Schaffer 2010a, 2010b). In essence, the difference between them is that existence monism does not recognize any parts of the cosmos, whereas priority monism does – it just insists that the parts are (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. Alexander Forbes, Walter Cannon, and Science-Based Literature.Justin Garson - 2013 - In A. Stiles, S. Finger & F. Boller (eds.), Progress in Brain Research Vol. 205: Literature, Neurology, and Neuroscience: Historical and Literary Connections. Amsterdam: Elsevier. pp. 241-256.
    The Harvard physiologists Alexander Forbes (1882-1965) and Walter Bradford Cannon (1871-1945) had an enormous impact on the physiology and neuroscience of the twentieth century. In addition to their voluminous scientific output, they also used literature to reflect on the nature of science itself and its social significance. Forbes wrote a novel, The Radio Gunner, a literary memoir, Quest for a Northern Air Route, and several short stories. Cannon, in addition to several books of popular science, wrote a literary memoir in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. "Bertrand Russell 1921-1970: The Ghost of Madness" by Ray Monk. [REVIEW]Tim Crane - 2000 - The Economist 1.
    ‘Poor Bertie’ Beatrice Webb wrote after receiving a visit from Bertrand Russell in 1931, ‘he has made a mess of his life and he knows it’. In the 1931 version of his Autobiography, Russell himself seemed to share Webb’s estimate of his achievements. Emotionally, intellectually and politically, he wrote, his life had been a failure. This sense of failure pervades the second volume of Ray Monk’s engrossing and insightful biography. At its heart is the failure of Russell’s marriages (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. D'vûd-i Karsî’nin Şerhu Îs'gûcî Adlı Eserinin Eleştirmeli Metin Neşri ve Değerlendirmesi.Ferruh Özpilavcı - 2017 - Cumhuriyet İlahiyat Dergisi 21 (3):2009-2009.
    Dâwûd al-Qarisî (Dâvûd al-Karsî) was a versatile and prolific 18th century Ottoman scholar who studied in İstanbul and Egypt and then taught for long years in various centers of learning like Egypt, Cyprus, Karaman, and İstanbul. He held high esteem for Mehmed Efendi of Birgi (Imâm Birgivî/Birgili, d.1573), out of respect for whom, towards the end of his life, Karsî, like Birgivî, occupied himself with teaching in the town of Birgi, where he died in 1756 and was buried next (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Is the Final Chapter of the Metaphysics of Morals Also the Final Chapter of the Practical Postulates?Samuel Kahn - 2015 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 89 (2):309-332.
    In this paper I trace the arc of Kant’s critical stance on the belief in God, beginning with the Critique of Pure Reason (1781) and culminating in the final chapter of the Metaphysics of Morals (1797). I argue that toward the end of his life, Kant changed his views on two important topics. First, despite his stinging criticism of it in the Critique of Pure Reason, by the time of the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant seems to endorse the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Jean-Paul Sartre: Key Concepts (Kindle E-Book Edition).Steven Churchill & Jack Reynolds (eds.) - 2013 - Routledge.
    Most readers of Sartre focus only on the works written at the peak of his influence as a public intellectual in the 1940s, notably "Being and Nothingness". "Jean-Paul Sartre: Key Concepts" aims to reassess Sartre and to introduce readers to the full breadth of his philosophy. Bringing together leading international scholars, the book examines concepts from across Sartre's career, from his initial views on the "inner life" of conscious experience, to his later conceptions of hope as the binding (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. The Intellectual Legacy of Stephen Bantu Biko (1946-1977).Hennie Lotter - 1992 - Acta Academica 24.
    In this essay I will attempt to explain the significance of Stephen Bantu Biko's life. This I will do in terms of his intellectual contribution to the liberation of black people from the radically unjust apartheid society in South Africa. Firstly, I will discuss his contribution to liberate blacks psychologically from the political system of apartheid, pointing out how he broke through the normative and pragmatic acceptance of the situation in the radically unjust apartheid society. He experienced black people (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. Sensibility as Vital Force or as Property of Matter in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Debates.Charles T. Wolfe - 2014 - In Henry Martyn Lloyd (ed.), The Discourse of Sensibility: The Knowing Body in the Enlightenment. Springer. pp. 147-170.
    Sensibility, in any of its myriad realms – moral, physical, aesthetic, medical and so on – seems to be a paramount case of a higher-level, intentional property, not a basic property. Diderot famously made the bold and attributive move of postulating that matter itself senses, or that sensibility (perhaps better translated ‘sensitivity’ here) is a general or universal property of matter, even if he at times took a step back from this claim and called it a “supposition.” Crucially, sensibility is (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20. The Practical Life, the Contemplative Life, and the Perfect Eudaimonia in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics 10.7-8.Timothy Roche - 2019 - Logos and Episteme 10 (1):31-49.
    Two views continue to be defended today. One is that the account of eudaimonia in EN 10 is inconsistent with claims made about it in other books of the work. The other view is that the account in EN 10 is consistent with other claims made in the other books because Aristotle presents one account of perfect eudaimonia by portraying it as consisting solely in contemplative activity. I call this view the intellectualist interpretation. I then argue that neither view (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Politics, Philosophy, Terror: Essays on the Thought of Hannah Arendt.Dana Villa - 1999 - Princeton University Press.
    Hannah Arendt's rich and varied political thought is more influential today than ever before, due in part to the collapse of communism and the need for ideas that move beyond the old ideologies of the Cold War. As Dana Villa shows, however, Arendt's thought is often poorly understood, both because of its complexity and because her fame has made it easy for critics to write about what she is reputed to have said rather than what she actually wrote. Villa sets (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  22. Intersubjectivity and Multiple Realities in Zarathushtra's Gathas.Olga Louchakova-Schwartz - 2018 - Open Theology 4 (1):471-488.
    The Gathas, a corpus of seventeen poems in Old Avestan composed by the ancient Iranian poet-priest Zarathushtra (Zoroaster) ca. 1200 B.C.E., is the foundation document of Zoroastrian religion. Even though the dualistic axiology of the Gathas has been widely noted, it has proved very difficult to understand the meaning and genre of the corpus or the position of Zarathushtra’s ideas with regard to other religious philosophies. Relying on recent advances in translation and decryptions of Gathic poetry, I shall here develop (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  86
    Introduction.Barry Smith & David Woodruff Smith - 1995 - In Barry Smith & David Woodruff Smith (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Husserl.
    Husserl’s philosophy, by the usual account, evolved through three stages: 1. development of an anti-psychologistic, objective foundation of logic and mathematics, rooted in Brentanian descriptive psychology; 2. development of a new discipline of "phenomenology" founded on a metaphysical position dubbed "transcendental idealism"; transformation of phenomenology from a form of methodological solipsism into a phenomenology of intersubjectivity and ultimately (in his Crisis of 1936) into an ontology of the life-world, embracing the social worlds of culture and history. We show that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  24.  12
    Aurel Kolnai.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran - 2020 - In Hilge Landweer & Thomas Szanto (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Phenomenology of Emotions. Routledge.
    Aurel Kolnai (1900–1973) is best known for his political and moral writings, but he also chiefly contributed to the phenomenology of the emotions. In a series of papers devoted to hostile and aversive emotions and, in particular, to disgust, haughty pride, fear, and hatred (Kolnai 1929, 1931, 1935 and 1998) Kolnai presents his most comprehensive views on the affective life and its ethical significance. Scattered discussions on the emotions can also be found in an early paper written on (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  97
    Spinoza, Religion and Recognition.Ericka Tucker - 2019 - In Maijastina Kahlos, Heikki J. Koskinen & Ritva Palmén (eds.), Reflections on Recognition: Contemporary and Historical Studies. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. pp. 219-231.
    In the pre-history of the concept of recognition Spinoza’s social philosophy deserves a special place. Although we rarely think of Spinoza as a social philosopher, Spinoza understood well the ways in which individual subjectivity is shaped by the social forces. I will argue that Spinoza offers a mechanism to understand the way in which recognition works, in order to untangle the web of affect, desire and ideas, which support the recognitions and misrecognitions at the foundation of social life. Spinoza (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Nietzschean Pragmatism. Sinhababu - 2017 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 48 (1):56-70.
    Nietzsche holds that one should believe what best promotes life, and he also accepts the correspondence theory of truth. I’ll call this conjunction of views Nietzschean pragmatism. This article provides textual evidence for attributing this pragmatist position to Nietzsche and explains how his broader metaethical views led him to it.The following section introduces Nietzschean pragmatism, discussing how Nietzsche expresses it in BGE, and distinguishing it from William James’s pragmatism about truth. The second section explains how Nietzsche’s skepticism (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Aristotle on Self-Sufficiency, External Goods, and Contemplation.Marc Gasser-Wingate - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (1):1-28.
    Aristotle tells us that contemplation is the most self-sufficient form of virtuous activity: we can contemplate alone, and with minimal resources, while moral virtues like courage require other individuals to be courageous towards, or courageous with. This is hard to square with the rest of his discussion of self-sufficiency in the Ethics: Aristotle doesn't generally seek to minimize the number of resources necessary for a flourishing human life, and seems happy to grant that such a life will be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  46
    Jaké to je, nebo o čem to je? Místo vědomí v materiálním světě.Tomas Hribek - 2017 - Praha, Česko: Filosofia.
    [What It’s Like, or What It’s About? The Place of Consciousness in the Material World] Summary: The book is both a survey of the contemporary debate and a defense of a distinctive position. Most philosophers nowadays assume that the focus of the philosophy of consciousness, its shared explanandum, is a certain property of experience variously called “phenomenal character,” “qualitative character,” “qualia” or “phenomenology,” understood in terms of what it is like to undergo the experience in question. Consciousness as defined in (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29.  89
    Craftspersonhood: The Forging of Selfhood Through Making.Jonathan Morgan - manuscript
    This paper examines the unique structures of identity formation within the craftsperson/maker mindset and their relation to Western views of work and labor. The contemporary Maker Movement has its origins not only in the internet revolution, but also in the revival of handicraft during the last several economic recessions. Economic uncertainty drives people toward the ideals and practices of craft as a way to regain a sense of agency and control. One learns how to become an active participant in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Hilmi Omar Budda’s Contribution to the History of Religions / Hi̇lmi̇ ömer budda’nin di̇nler tari̇hi̇ di̇si̇pli̇ni̇ne katkisi.Cemil Kutluturk - 2017 - Sakarya Üniversitesi İlahiyat Fakültesi Dergisi 19 (36):139-167.
    Hilmi Omar Budda (1894-1952) has played a significant role in the process of institutionalization of History of Religions in Turkey. He, who was the first academician in the field of History of Religions in Turkey, lectured for many years in Dâru’l-Funûn (Ottoman University) Faculty of Divinity, which was found in 1924. Then he worked in department of Institute of Islamic Sciences, which was a branch of Istanbul University Faculty of Arts, by pursuing his same position and career. After that, Budda (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. The Role of Platonism in Augustine's 386 Conversion to Christianity.Mark J. Boone - May 2015 - Religion Compass 9 (5):151-61.
    Augustine′s conversion to Christianity in A.D. 386 is a pivotal moment not only in his own life, but in Christian and world history, for the theology of Augustine set the course of theological and cultural development in the western Christian church. But to what exactly was Augustine converted? Scholars have long debated whether he really converted to Christianity in 386, whether he was a Platonist, and, if he adhered to both Platonism and Christianity, which dominated his thought. The debate (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Luminescent Physicalism, A Book Review of Evan Thompson's *Waking, Dreaming, Being*. [REVIEW]Gregory M. Nixon - 2016 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 23 (9-10):262-267.
    This is a fine book by an extraordinary author whose literary followers have awaited a definitive statement of his views on consciousness since his participation in the important book on biological autopoiesis, The Embodied Mind (Varela, Thompson, & Rosch, 1991) and his recent neurophenomenology of biological systems, Mind in Life (2007). In the latter book, Thompson demonstrated the continuity of life and mind, whereas in this book he uses neurophenomenology as well as erudite renditions of Buddhist philosophy (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Hegel's Moral Philosophy.Katerina Deligiorgi - 2016 - In Dean Moyar (ed.), Oxford Handbook to Hegel's Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Does Hegel have anything to contribute to moral philosophy? If moral philosophy presupposes the soundness of what he calls the 'standpoint of morality [Moralität]' (PR §137), then Hegel's contribution is likely to be negative. As is well known, he argues that morality fails to provide us with substantive answers to questions about what is good or morally required and tends to gives us a distorted, subject-centred view of our practical lives; moral concerns are best addressed from the 'standpoint of ethical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. The “Death” of Monads: G. W. Leibniz on Death and Anti-Death.Roinila Markku - 2016 - In Charles Tandy (ed.), Death and Anti Death, vol. 14: Four Decades after Michael Polanyi, Three Centuries after G. W. Leibniz. Ann Arbor: RIA University Press. pp. 243-266.
    According to Leibniz, there is no death in the sense that the human being or animal is destroyed completely. This is due to his metaphysical pluralism which would suffer if the number of substances decreased. While animals transform into other animals after “death”, human beings are rewarded or punished of their behavior in this life. This paper presents a comprehensive account of how Leibniz thought the “death” to take place and discusses his often unclear views on the (...) after death. I will also present a new, naturalistic reading of Leibniz’s views on afterlife. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  57
    One True Life: The Stoics and Early Christians as Rival Traditions.William O. Stephens - 2018 - Ancient Philosophy 38 (2):477-481.
    A sloppy, smug, conceptually muddled, and tendentious Christian apologist's comparison of narrowly selected texts from Seneca, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, Paul, Luke, and Justin Martyr. Following Alasdair MacIntyre, Rowe defends the traditionist view according to which Spirit-enhanced ‘supernatural’ discourse is intelligible only to those on the inside of Christian faith. Rowe argues that morality and religion are abstractions. Rowe presents his translations of Seneca, Epictetus, Marcus, Paul, Luke, and Justin into modern English while also being committed to the traditionist view that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. „ “What is Time?”.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2014 - In Aaron Garrett (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Eighteenth Century Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 232-244.
    Time is one of the most enigmatic notions philosophers have ever dealt with. Once subjected to close examination, almost any feature usually ascribed to time, leads to a plethora of fundamental and hard to resolve questions. Just as philosophers of the eighteenth-century attempted to take account of revolutionary developments in the physical sciences in understanding space, life, and a host of other fundamental aspects of nature (see Jones, Gaukroger, and Smith in this volume) they also engaged in fundamental and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  25
    François Lamy’s Cartesian Refutation of Spinoza’s Ethics.Jack Stetter - 2019 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 1 (1):7.
    François Lamy, a Benedictine monk and Cartesian philosopher whose extensive relations with Arnauld, Bossuet, Fénélon, and Malebranche put him into contact with the intellectual elite of late-seventeenth-century France, authored the very first detailed and explicit refutation of Spinoza’s Ethics in French, Le nouvel athéisme renversé. Regrettably overlooked in the secondary literature on Spinoza, Lamy is an interesting figure in his own right, and his anti-Spinozist work sheds important light on Cartesian assumptions that inform the earliest phase of Spinoza’s critical reception (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. What's Wrong with Exploitation?Justin Schwartz - 1995 - Noûs 29 (2):158-188.
    Marx thinks that capitalism is exploitative, and that is a major basis for his objections to it. But what's wrong with exploitation, as Marx sees it? (The paper is exegetical in character: my object is to understand what Marx believed,) The received view, held by Norman Geras, G.A. Cohen, and others, is that Marx thought that capitalism was unjust, because in the crudest sense, capitalists robbed labor of property that was rightfully the workers' because the workers and not the capitalists (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39. Editorial, Cosmopolis. Spirituality, Religion and Politics.Paul Ghils - 2015 - Cosmopolis. A Journal of Cosmopolitics 7 (3-4).
    Cosmopolis A Review of Cosmopolitics -/- 2015/3-4 -/- Editorial Dominique de Courcelles & Paul Ghils -/- This issue addresses the general concept of “spirituality” as it appears in various cultural contexts and timeframes, through contrasting ideological views. Without necessarily going back to artistic and religious remains of primitive men, which unquestionably show pursuits beyond the biophysical dimension and illustrate practices seeking to unveil the hidden significance of life and death, the following papers deal with a number of interpretations (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. This World Without Another. On Jean-Luc Nancy and la Mondialisation.Pieter Meurs - 2009 - Journal of Critical Globalisation Studies 1 (1):31-46.
    In this paper, we turn to the philosophy of Jean-Luc Nancy. In his work La Création du Monde ou la Mondialisation of 2002 the French philosopher analyses the process of globalisation. Rather than denoting a new homogeneity, the term refers to a world horizon characterized in its interpalpable multiplicity of cultural, socio-economical, ideological and politico-moral content. According to Nancy, globalisation refers to ag-glome-ration: the decay of what once was a globe and now nothing more than a glome. On the one (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. An Aristotelian Theory of Divine Illumination: Robert Grosseteste's Commentary on the Posterior Analytics.Christina Van Dyke - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (4):685-704.
    Two central accounts of human cognition emerge over the course of the Middle Ages: the theory of divine illumination and an Aristotelian theory centered on abstraction from sense data. Typically, these two accounts are seen as competing views of the origins of human knowledge; theories of divine illumination focus on God’s direct intervention in our epistemic lives, whereas Aristotelian theories generally claim that our knowledge derives primarily (or even entirely) from sense perception. In this paper, I address an early (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. Johannes Fontana’s Drawing for a Castellus Umbrarum, Udine or Padua, C. 1415–20.Bennett Gilbert - 2014 - Mediaevalia 35 (1):255-277.
    A finished sketch for a light-and-shadow projection device by the Paduan mechanical artisan Johannes de Fontana (c.1395–1455), in his manuscript book of drawings now known as Liber Bellicorum Instrumentorum, depicts a machine for communicating ideas or information through spectacle. The manuscript is fairly well known, and this sketch is just one of many interesting images worthy of study in its 70 leaves. A couple dozen manuscripts of the mechanical arts from this period survive, the best-studied of which fall into the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Prawdziwie darwinowska etyka.Andrzej Elzanowski - 2010 - Lectiones Et Acroases Philosophicae 3:13-57.
    True Darwinian Ethics -/- Darwin’s model for the evolution of morality as presented in Descent of Man (1871) is shown to comprise three major stages that are here referred to as empathic premorality, tribal morality, and universalizing morality. Empathy, the key component of Darwin’s “social instincts” that started moral evolution, is here recognized as the principal cognitive device that conveys epistemic credibility to moral agency. The two constitutive elements of the tribal morality are conscience that Darwin conceived of as a (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Was wir nicht verlieren dürfen.Erwin Sonderegger - 2007 - Studia Philosophica 66:197-210.
    Different reasons give rise to the question, what philosophy really is, and by tradition we know many answers. Plato’s answer can be found by examining his explicit statements about philosophy in his dialogues, or by analyzing his representation of Socrates – philosophy become fl esh. But an other way to fi nd an answer to the question lies in examining the things which – according to Plato – we cannot do without. There are three of them, namely the idea, logos (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Filosofía y política en la defensa de la 'naturalis contemplatio' en un aristotélico del renacimiento: Cesare Cremonini (1550-1631).Giulio F. Pagallo - 1999 - Apuntes Filosóficos 15:43-78.
    Se examina la defensa que de la filosofía en cuanto episteme, elaboró el aristotélico renacentista Cesare Cremonini (1550-1 631), al introducir el curso de lecciones sobre la Física de Aristóteles, según la redacci6n todavía inédita del Ms.200-2 de la Biblioteca Universitaria de Padua. Mediante un topos ya clásico, y actual, los temas en discusión son además de la falta de certitudo y la inconsistencia veritativa que afectan las conclusiones de la filosofía de la naturaleza, la inutilidad e incluso la peligrosidad (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  75
    Metaphysics, Mysticism and Russell.Alan Schwerin - 2002 - Contemporary Philosophy (1 & 2): 45 - 50.
    Towards the end of 1911, Russell complains that philosophy has unfortunately not produced a set of religious beliefs that he can rely on in his personal life. Early in his career philosophy had appeared very promising. But the adoption of G.E. Moores's philosophical views put paid to the "last hope of getting any creed out of philosophy". My paper is an attempt to show that Russell ought to celebrate, and not complain about the products of his philosophical endeavours. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Filozofia praw człowieka. Prawa człowieka w świetle ich międzynarodowej ochrony.Marek Piechowiak - 1999 - Towarzystwo Naukowe KUL.
    PHILOSOPHY OF HUMAN RIGHTS: HUMAN RIGHTS IN LIGHT OF THEIR INTERNATIONAL PROTECTION Summary The book consists of two main parts: in the first, on the basis of an analysis of international law, elements of the contemporary conception of human rights and its positive legal protection are identified; in the second - in light of the first part -a philosophical theory of law based on the tradition leading from Plato, Aristotle, and St. Thomas Aquinas is constructed. The conclusion contains an application (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48.  38
    Mircea Eliade wobec doktryny światłości mistycznej.Anton Marczynski - 2007 - Przeglad Filozoficzny - Nowa Seria 64:339-349.
    Eliade and the Doctrine of Mystic Lights Eliade believed that in every religion there are reports about an experience of mystic light. Furthermore, all such reports mention that the person who experienced the light subsequently underwent a deep transformation of her or his spirit and began a new life, the life of a holy man or homo religiosus, which is identical – in its purest form – with the life of a mystic. A clear example of one (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  60
    How Not to Avoid Speaking.Chien-Hsing Ho - 1996 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 24 (5):541-562.
    Mahayana Buddhist philosophers’ attitude toward language is notoriously negative. The transcendental reality is often said to be ineffable. One’s obsession to apprehend the truth through words is an intellectual disease to be cured Attachment to verbal and conceptual proliferation enslaves oneself in the afflictive circle of life and death. Nevertheless, no Buddhist can afford to overlook the significance of language in preaching Buddhist dharmas as well as in day-to-day transactions. The point is not that of keeping silence. Rather, one (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  45
    Remembering My Self: Priest, Philosopher, Human Being.Edmund Byrne - 2017 - Herndon, VA: Mascot Books.
    Some 120,000 priests have left the Catholic Church in the past 60 years, a third of these in the United States. This book is a personal account of the life of a man who left the priesthood and transitioned into a successful career as an academic. His case illustrates the reasons for leaving that are fairly typical. But above and beyond these it details some deeper systemic problems that he encountered first in the religious realm and then in the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000