Results for 'Major Philosophers'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Hegel’s Antigone.Patricia Jagentowicz Mills - 1986 - The Owl of Minerva 17 (2):131-152.
    Hegel's interpretation of Sophocles' play Antigone is central to an understanding of woman's role in the Hegelian system. Hegel is fascinated by this play and uses it in both the Phenomenology and the Philosophy of Right to demonstrate that familial ethical life is woman's unique responsibility. Antigone is revealed as the paradigmatic figure of womanhood and family life in both the ancient and modern worlds, although there are fundamental differences between these two worlds for Hegel. Through an immanent critique of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2.  54
    Gdzie spotykają się filozofowie Wschodu i Zachodu? Refleksje o filozofii porównawczej i konferencji w Honolulu „11th East-West Philosophers’ Conference”.Marzenna Jakubczak - 2016 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 6 (2):519-528.
    The paper presents the idea of cross‐cultural philosophy, which have inspired the organizers of the cyclic global conferences held at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, USA, since 193 First, the author discusses some definitions of the comparative method applied in contemporary philosophy and promoted, among others, through the project of the “East‐West Philosophers’ Conference”. Then, she reports the major themes and panel topics raised during the eleventh conference organized in Honolulu, May 25–31, 2016.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Minor Tweaks, Major Payoffs: The Problems and Promise of Situationism in Moral Philosophy.Hagop Sarkissian - 2010 - Philosophers' Imprint 10.
    Moral philosophers of late have been examining the implications of experimental social psychology for ethics. The focus of attention has been on situationism—the thesis that we routinely underestimate the extent to which minor situational variables influence morally significant behavior. Situationism has been seen as a threat to prevailing lay and philosophical theories of character, personhood, and agency. In this paper, I outline the situationist literature and critique one of its upshots: the admonition to carefully select one’s situational contexts. Besides (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  4. Pleased and Afflicted: Hume on the Paradox of Tragic Pleasure.Eva M. Dadlez - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):213-236.
    How fast can you run? As fast as a leopard. How fast are you going to run?
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. John Henry Newman’s Anglican Views on Judaism.Steven D. Aguzzi - 2010 - Newman Studies Journal 7 (1):56-72.
    The scant scholarship associated with Newman’s Anglican views about Judaism has focused on his negative rhetoric against Judaism and portrayed him as anti-Semitic. His Anglican writings, however, applied terms associated with Judaism in a typological sense to the political and religious realities of his day, primarily to support his apologetic agenda and to highlight threats to the Church of England. Simultaneously, he stressed the positive characteristics of Judaism, illustrated the continuity between Judaism and Christianity, and pointed out that the religious (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Newman’s First Two Notes on Development and Patristic Millenarianism.Steven D. Aguzzi - 2014 - Newman Studies Journal 11 (2):4-19.
    In recent years, critical discourse concerning the millenarian eschatology of the early Patristic era of Christianity has called into question the common notion that millenarian concepts have been utterly rejected as heretical by the Roman Catholic Church. No Ecumenical Council has ever rejected millenarian eschatology, and papal and juridical statements on the issue have been taken out of context. This essay brings forward, as testing agents, John Henry Newman’s first two notes in Development in order to determine whether Patristic millenarianism, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Hume: Second Newton of the Moral Sciences.Jane L. McIntyre - 1994 - Hume Studies 20 (1):3-18.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8. The Bibliothèque Raisonnée Review of Volume 3 of the Treatise: Authorship, Text, and Translation.David Fate Norton & Dario Perinetti - 2006 - Hume Studies 32 (1):3-52.
    The review of volume 3 of Hume’s Treatise, a review that appeared in the Bibliothèque raisonnée in the spring of 1741, was the first published responseto Hume’s ethical theory. This review is also of interest because of questions that have arisen about its authorship and that of the earlier review of volume 1 of the Treatise in the same journal. In Part 1 of this paper we attribute to Pierre Des Maizeaux the notice of vols. 1 and 2 of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Hegel’s Phenomenology and the Question of Semantic Pragmatism.Brian O’Connor - 2006 - The Owl of Minerva 38 (1/2):127-143.
    This paper criticizes the assumptions behind Robert Brandom’s reading of Hegel’s Phenomenology, contending that Hegel’s concern with the rational structure of experience, his valorization of reflection over ordinary experience and his idea of the necessit y of progress in knowledge cannot be accommodated within the framework of semantic pragmatism. The central contentions are that Brandom’s pragmatism never comes to terms with Hegel’s idea of truth as a result, leading to a historicist distortion, and also that Brandom’s failure to deal with (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10. The Strength of Hume’s “Weak” Sympathy.Andrew S. Cunningham - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):237-256.
    Hume’s understanding of sympathy in section 2.1.11 of the Treatise—that it is a mental mechanism by means of which one sentient being can come to share the psychological states of another—has a particularly interesting implication. What the sympathizer receives, according to this definition, is the passing psychological “affection” that the object of his sympathy was experiencing at the moment of observation. Thus the psychological connection produced by Humean sympathy is not between the sympathizer and the “other” as a “whole person” (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. A Sermon of John Henry Newman at St. Clement's.Attilio Rossi - 2013 - Newman Studies Journal 10 (2):74-87.
    This study considers Newman’s sermon—“On the Nature of the Future Promise”—which he preached on 4 September 1825 at St. Clement’s Church, Oxford—likely with his mother and sisters present in the congregation; in addition to treating Newman’s style of preaching and Evangelical theology, this sermon’s theological and pastoral dimensions are also examined.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Whitehead on the Experience of Causality.Samuel Gomes - 2015 - Process Studies 44 (1):63-82.
    In this article I compare Hume and Whitehead on the experience of causality. I examine Whitehead's examples of such an experience and I offer a defense of Whitehead against Hume on this topic.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Barbarity, Civilization and Decadence.Arran Gare - 2009 - Chromatikon: Annales de la Philosophie En Procès / Yearbook of Philosophy in Process 5:167-189.
    In 1984 scientists in the former Soviet Union called for an ecological civilization. This idea was taken up in 1987 in China by Ye Qianji. Subsequently the notion of ecological civilization was promoted by the deputy director of China’s State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA), Pan Yue, incorporated into the Central Commission Report to the Communist Party’s 17th Convention in November, 2007, and embraced as one of the key elements in its political guidelines. Characterized as the successor to agricultural and industrial (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Critical Study of Livingston's Philosophical Melancholy and Delirium. [REVIEW]Peter S. Fosl - 1998 - Hume Studies 24 (2):355-366.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Freedom, Truth, and History: An Introduction to Hegel’s Philosophy. [REVIEW]David Kolb - 1995 - The Owl of Minerva 26 (2):221-224.
    Stephen Houlgate has written an introduction to Hegel that is more than historical. For him, “Hegel’s is still a viable philosophical endeavour with extremely important things to contribute to modern debates, particularly the debates about historical relativism, poverty and social alienation, the nature of freedom and political legitimacy, the future of art, and the character of the Christian faith”. This ambitious book is clearly written and very thoughtful. By concentrating on a number of central themes, Houlgate avoids giving us another (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  97
    Naturalism, Theism, and the Origin of Life.Joseph E. Earley - 1998 - Process Studies 27 (3-4):267-279.
    Alvin Plantinga and Phillip E. Johnson strongly attack "metaphysical naturalism", a doctrine based, in part, on Darwinian concepts. They claim that this doctrine dominates American academic, educational, and legal thought, and that it is both erroneous and pernicious. Stuart Kauffman claims that currently accepted versions of Darwinian evolutionary theory are radically incomplete, that they should be supplemented by explicit recognition of the importance of coherent structures — the prevalence of "order for free". Both of these developments are here interpreted in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  65
    The Dog That is a Heavenly Constellation and the Dog That is a Barking Animal by Alexandre Koyré.Oberto Marrama - 2014 - The Leibniz Review 24:95-108.
    The article includes the French to English translation of a seminal article by Alexandre Koyré (“Le chien, constellation céleste, et le chien animal aboyant”, in Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale, 55e Année, N° 1, Jan-Mar 1950, pp. 50-59), accompanied by an explanatory introduction. Koyré's French text provides an illuminating commentary of E1p17s, where Spinoza exposes at length his account of the relationship existing between God's intellect and the human intellect. The lack of an English translation of this article has (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Debilissimae Entitates? Bisterfeld and Leibniz’s Ontology of Relations.Maria Rosa Antognazza - 2001 - The Leibniz Review 11:1-22.
    Over the past decades a number of scholars have identified Johann Heinrich Bisterfeld as one of the most decisive early influences on Leibniz. In particular, the impressive similarity between their conceptions of universal harmony has been stressed. Since the issue of relations is at the heart of both Bisterfeld and Leibniz’s doctrines of universal harmony, the extent of the similarity between their doctrines will depend, however, on Bisterfeld and Leibniz’s respective theories of relations, and especially on their ontologies of relations. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  67
    Kraus’s Boethian Interpretation of Whitehead’s God.Rem B. Edwards - 1981 - Process Studies 11 (1):30-34.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  73
    Identity as a Process of Self-Determination in Hegel’s Logic.Christopher Yeomans - 2007 - Proceedings of the Hegel Society of America 18:63-82.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. L’Effet Whitehead.Michel Weber - 1994 - Process Studies 23 (3-4):282-284.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  68
    People and Their Worth: Uniting Process and Axiology.Rem B. Edwards - 2009 - Process Studies 38 (1):43-68.
    This article argues that process philosophy and Hartmanian formal axiology are natural allies that can contribute much to each other. Hartmanian axiology can bring much needed order and clarity to process thought about the definitions of “good,” “better,” and “best,” about what things are intrinsically good, and about the nature and value of unique, enduring, individual persons. Process thought can bring to axiology greater clarity about and emphasis on the relational and temporal features of human selfhood. The nature and significance (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  31
    Contemplative Compassion.Jordan Joseph Wales - 2018 - Augustinian Studies 49 (2):199-219.
    Gregory the Great depicts himself as a contemplative who, as bishop of Rome, was compelled to become an administrator and pastor. His theological response to this existential tension illuminates the vexed questions of his relationships to predecessors and of his legacy. Gregory develops Augustine’s thought in such a way as to satisfy John Cassian’s position that contemplative vision is grounded in the soul’s likeness to the unity of Father and Son. For Augustine, “mercy” lovingly lifts the neighbor toward life in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. “In the Depth of Her Heart”—A Spinozian Reading of Flaubert’s Madame Bovary.Antonella Lang-Balestra - 2008 - Chromatikon: Annales de la Philosophie En Procès / Yearbook of Philosophy in Process 4:135-142.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Xavier Verley, Sur le Symbolisme. Cassirer, Whitehead Et Ruyer. [On Symbolism: Cassirer, Whitehead, and Ruyer.].Philippe Gagnon - 2013 - Process Studies 42 (2):283-288.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  77
    Review of Santayana the Philosopher: Philosophy as a Form of Life, by Daniel Moreno. [REVIEW]Martin Coleman - 2015 - Overheard in Seville 33 (33):72-75.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  46
    Robert Scholes.Martin E. Turkis Ii - 2017 - Tradition and Discovery 43 (2):43-61.
    Robert Scholes is a respected literary critic and semiotician who, motivated by dissatisfaction with the reigning epistemological assumptions in the field of literary theory, has advocated revamping the discipline of English in significant ways. Scholes’s own epistemology and semiotic approach to pedagogy cohere quite well with Polanyi’s epistemological work and are, in essence, post-critical. Given that far more students in the American educational system study English than philosophy, a wider embrace of Scholes’s pedagogical approach could provide more opportunities than are (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Hegel and the Overcoming of the Understanding.Michael Baur - 1991 - The Owl of Minerva 22 (2):141-158.
    The purpose of the present essay is to explicate the basic movement which the Understanding exercises upon itself at the end of the chapter on “Force and the Understanding” in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. Unlike many other commentators on the Phenomenology, I hope to show how Hegel’s argumentation in this chapter applies not merely to the Newtonian paradigm (to which Hegel makes explicit reference), but to any paradigm which involves the objectivistic presuppositions of the Understanding.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  52
    Comment on Richard Rubin’s “Santayana and the Arts” and Richard Rubin’s Reply.Martin Coleman & Richard M. Rubin - 2016 - Overheard in Seville 34 (34):59-61.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. I doveri deI principe cristiano nel Registrum Epistularum di Gregorio Magno.Franca Ela Consolino - 1993 - Augustinianum 33 (1/2):57-82.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  66
    Morris Grossman on Santayana.Martin Coleman - 2014 - Overheard in Seville 32 (32):11-18.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  67
    Exposing an English Speculative Word.David Kolb - 2000 - The Owl of Minerva 31 (2):199-202.
    Hegel congratulated himself on noticing that the German verb aufheben embodied a speculative dialectic in the interrelation of its multiple meanings. Translators have been hard put to find an equivalent English word. I think I have found a similar word in English, which, if not exactly a translation, still shows a similar interaction among the contrasting motions of its different meanings.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  45
    Comment on Nancy Ogle’s “Santayana and Voice”.Martin Coleman - 2016 - Overheard in Seville 34 (34):42-43.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  41
    Beyond the Pale: The Spectre of Formal Universality.David Kolb - 2004 - The Owl of Minerva 36 (1):15-30.
    Frederick Neuhouser's The Foundations of Hegel's Social Theory expertly answers many standard objections to Hegel's theory, and offers a careful reading of its basic principles. However, questions remain whether Neuhouser can successfully reconstruct Hegel's theory while avoiding its links to Hegel's logic. Hegel's normative conclusions depend on logical principles about the self that are not adequately translated into Neuhouser's normative and consequentialist arguments.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  79
    Global Climate Destabilization and the Crisis of Civilization.Arran Gare - 2010 - Chromatikon: Annales de la Philosophie En Procès / Yearbook of Philosophy in Process 6:11-24.
    James Hansen, the world’s leading climate scientist, argues that global climate destabilization could totally destroy the conditions for life on Earth, and further, that politicians are not taking effective action. Instead, they are using their power to cripple science. This situation is explained in this paper as the outcome of the successful alliance between a global class of predators and people who must be recognized as idiots taking over the institutions of government, research and education and transforming governments into governments (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  65
    Vichian Echoes in Chapter 14 of Joyce’s Ulysses.Vincenzo Pepe - 2008 - New Vico Studies 26:67-73.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  27
    Public Recognition, Vanity, and the Quest for Truth: Reflection on ‘Polanyi Vs. Kuhn’.Aaron Milavec - 2006 - Tradition and Discovery 33 (2):37-48.
    After commending Moleski for his excellent study, I focus attention on three areas that merit further clarification: (1) that Michael Polanyi’s quest for public recognition was legitimate and not the effect of a runaway vanity, (2) that Kuhn’s straining to define his dependence upon Polanyi was blocked by the unspecifiability clouding the discovery process and by his notion that Polanyi appealed to ESP to explain the dynamics of· discovery, and (3) that Kuhn’s success in gaining public recognition for his paradigm (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Philosophy and Philosophers: An Introduction to Western Philosophy.James Edwin Mahon - 1995 - History of European Ideas 21 (4):584-585.
    In this review of John Shand's book on the history of western philosophy, I point out that the book is only concerned with epistemology and metaphysics, and only considers in detail the work of twenty individual philosophers. There are no entries on Socrates, Hobbes, Bentham, Schopenhauer, Mill, Kierkegaard, Marx, James, Frege, or Heidegger, and the final chapter on "Recent Philosophy" is only six and a half pages long, with each of the thirteen philosophers given a single paragraph each. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. ‘Noble’ Ascesis Between Nietzsche and Foucault.James Urpeth - 1998 - New Nietzsche Studies 2 (3/4):65-91.
    This paper argues that Foucault’s The History of Sexuality contains an implicit but important interpretation of Nietzsche’s critique of the ‘ascetic ideal’. It suggests that Foucault undertakes a non-reductive synthesis of seemingly conflicting aspects of Nietzsche’s thought, on the one hand, its valorisation of the ‘Dionysian’ and, on the other hand, its enthusiasm for ‘self-disciplining’. The consequences of a failure to appreciate how Nietzsche’s thought combines these two themes is illustrated through a sketch of what is termed an ‘oppositional’ interpretation (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. Merleau-Ponty’s Concept of Nature: Passage, the Oneiric and Interanimality.Glen Mazis - 2000 - Chiasmi International 2:223-48.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  36
    Ancient Philosophers of Nature on Tides and Currents.Eugene Afonasin - 2017 - Filosofiâ I Kosmologiâ 19 (1):155-167.
    The article deals with currents and tides. We look at the history of their observation in antiquity as well as alternative theories, designed to explain their nature. Major theories accessed are those by Aristotle, Posidonius and Seneca. Special attention is given to ancient explanation of the phenomenon of the periodical change of the stream in Euripus’ channel. Throughout we refl ect on an analogy between natural phenomena and the processes occurring in living organisms, common to our philosophers of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Constructing the World.David Chalmers - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Inspired by Rudolf Carnap's Der Logische Aufbau Der Welt, David J. Chalmers argues that the world can be constructed from a few basic elements. He develops a scrutability thesis saying that all truths about the world can be derived from basic truths and ideal reasoning. This thesis leads to many philosophical consequences: a broadly Fregean approach to meaning, an internalist approach to the contents of thought, and a reply to W. V. Quine's arguments against the analytic and the a priori. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   136 citations  
  43.  44
    Measure for Measure: Wittgenstein's Critique of the Augustinian Picture of Music.Eran Guter - 2019 - In Hanne Appelqvist (ed.), Wittgenstein and the Limits of Language. London: Routledge. pp. 245-269.
    This article concerns the distinction between memory-time and information-time, which appeared in Wittgenstein’s middle-period lectures and writings, and its relation to Wittgenstein’s career-long reflection about musical understanding. While the idea of “information-time” entails a public frame of reference typically pertaining to objects which persist in physical time, the idea of pure “memory-time” involves the totality of one’s present memories and expectations that do now provide any way of measuring time-spans. I argue that Wittgenstein’s critique of Augustine notion of pure memory-time (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  77
    A Historical Outline of Byzantine Philosophy and Its Basic Subjects.Katelis Viglas - 2010 - Peitho 1 (1):121-144.
    The article seeks to present an overview of the history of Byzantine philosophy. It takes its point of departure in the most important factors that influenced and shaped the Patristic thought. Subsequently, the paper considers the relative autonomy of Byzantine philosophy and offers a brief profile of major philosophers that contributed to the stream in the period from 9th to 15th century. From the numerous subjects that were taken into account by the most prominent Byzantine philosophers, the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  45
    Relativism in the Context of National Socialism.Johannes Steizinger - 2019 - In Martin Kusch (ed.), Routledge Handbook to Relativism. New York, London: pp. 114-123.
    The aim of this chapter is to clarify the use and meaning of the concept of relativism in the context of National Socialism (NS). Section 1 examines the critical reproach that NS is a form of relativism. I analyze and criticize the common core of this widespread argument which has dominated discussions about the topic up to the present. Section 2 sketches the general debates on relativism before and during NS. I show that fascist thought could be associated with both (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Thinking in Transition: Nishida Kitaro and Martin Heidegger.Elmar Weinmayr, tr Krummel, John W. M. & Douglas Ltr Berger - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2):232-256.
    : Two major philosophers of the twentieth century, the German existential phenomenologist Martin Heidegger and the seminal Japanese Kyoto School philosopher Nishida Kitarō are examined here in an attempt to discern to what extent their ideas may converge. Both are viewed as expressing, each through the lens of his own tradition, a world in transition with the rise of modernity in the West and its subsequent globalization. The popularity of Heidegger's thought among Japanese philosophers, despite its own (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  47. Intentionality: Past and Future (Value Inquiry Book Series, Volume 173).Gabor Forrai (ed.) - 2005 - New York: Rodopi NY.
    The present volume has grown out of a conference organized jointly by the History of Philosophy Department of the University of Miskolc and the History and Philosophy of Science Department of Eötvös Loránd University (Budapest), which took place in June 2002. The aim of the conference was to explore the various angles from which intentionality can be studied, how it is related to other philosophical issues, and how it figures in the works of major philosophers in the past. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  48.  52
    Semantic Equivalence and the Language of Philosophical Analysis.Jorge J. E. Gracia - manuscript
    For many years I have maintained that I learned to philosophize by translating Francisco Suárez’s Metaphysical Disputation V from Latin into English. This surely is a claim that must sound extraordinary to the members of this audience or even to most twentieth century philosophers. Who reads Suárez these days? And what could I learn from a sixteenth century scholastic writer that would help me in the twentieth century? I would certainly be surprised if one were to find any references (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Hilary Putnam on Meaning and Necessity.Anders Öberg - 2011 - Dissertation, Uppsala University
    In this dissertation on Hilary Putnam's philosophy, I investigate his development regarding meaning and necessity, in particular mathematical necessity. Putnam has been a leading American philosopher since the end of the 1950s, becoming famous in the 1960s within the school of analytic philosophy, associated in particular with the philosophy of science and the philosophy of language. Under the influence of W.V. Quine, Putnam challenged the logical positivism/empiricism that had become strong in America after World War II, with influential exponents such (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. For (Some) Immigration Restrictions.Hrishikesh Joshi - forthcoming - In Bob Fischer (ed.), Ethics Left and Right: The Moral Issues that Divide Us. Oxford University Press.
    According to many philosophers, the world should embrace open borders – that is, let people move around the globe and settle as they wish, with exceptions made only in very specific cases such as fugitives or terrorists. Defenders of open borders have adopted two major argumentative strategies. The first is to claim that immigration restrictions involve coercion, and then show that such coercion cannot be morally justified. The second is to argue that adopting worldwide open borders policies would (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000