5 found
Order:
See also
Profile: Mark J. Boone (Hong Kong Baptist University)
  1.  39
    The Unity of the Virtues and the Degeneration of Kallipolis.Mark J. Boone - 2011 - Apeiron 44 (2):131-146.
    Each of the degenerating constitutions in Book VIII of Plato's Republic is the result of the disappearance of one of the four cardinal virtues. The failure of wisdom creates a timocracy; the failure of courage, an oligarchy; the failure of moderation, a democracy; the failure of justice, a tyranny. The degeneration shows that the disunited virtues are imperfect, though they have some power to stave off vice. Thus Book VIII implies a unity of the virtues thesis according to which perfect (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2.  13
    The Role of Platonism in Augustine's 386 Conversion to Christianity.Mark J. Boone - May 2015 - Religion Compass 9 (5):151-61.
    Augustine′s conversion to Christianity in A.D. 386 is a pivotal moment not only in his own life, but in Christian and world history, for the theology of Augustine set the course of theological and cultural development in the western Christian church. But to what exactly was Augustine converted? Scholars have long debated whether he really converted to Christianity in 386, whether he was a Platonist, and, if he adhered to both Platonism and Christianity, which dominated his thought. The debate of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  6
    Ancient-Future Hermeneutics: Postmodern, Biblical Inerrancy, and the Rule of Faith.Mark J. Boone - 2016 - Criswell Theological Review 14 (1).
    At the heart of two recent theological traditions are hermeneutical principles which are not only consistent but are integrated in the hermeneutics of Augustine. According to the doctrine of biblical inerrancy as it has been recently articulated by Evangelicals, Scripture has an original meaning, and that meaning is not open to the possibility of error. According to some thinkers in postmodern theology, including Jean-Luc Marion, the meaning of Scripture transcends its original meaning. After examining postmodernism and inerrancy, I consider their (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  10
    Plutarch and Augustine on the Battlestar Galactica: Rediscovering Our Need for Virtue and Grace Through Modern Fiction.Mark J. Boone - 2013 - Imaginatio Et Ratio: A Journal for Theology and the Arts 2 (1).
    Two ancient sages show how even the most salacious fiction can be spiritually beneficial, for it shows our need for virtue and for grace. The first is the Roman philosopher Plutarch. Among ancient moral philosophers who were concerned with the effects of bad behavior in fiction, Plutarch distinguishes himself by showing how we can benefit morally from such stories. To do so we must approach them with a critical mind and from the right perspective; only then will we have the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  9
    Taking God Seriously, but Not Too Seriously: The Divine Command Theory and William James' 'The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life’.Mark J. Boone - 2013 - William James Studies 10:1-20.
    While some scholars neglect the theological component to William James’s ethical views in “The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life,” Michael Cantrell reads it as promoting a divine command theory (DCT) of the foundations of moral obligation. While Cantrell’s interpretation is to be commended for taking God seriously, he goes a little too far in the right direction. Although James’s view amounts to what could be called (and what Cantrell does call) a DCT because on it God’s demands are necessary (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography