Results for 'Nicomachean Ethics'

998 found
Order:
  1. Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics: An Introduction.Michael Pakaluk - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is an engaging and accessible introduction to the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle's great masterpiece of moral philosophy. Michael Pakaluk offers a thorough and lucid examination of the entire work, uncovering Aristotle's motivations and basic views while paying careful attention to his arguments. The chapter on friendship captures Aristotle's doctrine with clarity and insight, and Pakaluk gives original and compelling interpretations of the Function Argument, the Doctrine of the Mean, courage and other character virtues, Akrasia, and the two treatments (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  2. Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics 3.5, 1113b7-8 and Free Choice.Susanne Bobzien - 2014 - In R. Salles P. Destree (ed.), What is up to us? Studies on Causality and Responsibility in Ancient Philosophy. Academia Verlag.
    ABSTRACT: This is a short companion piece to my ‘Found in Translation – Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics III.5 1113b7-8 and its Reception’ in which I examine in close textual analysis the philosophical question whether these two lines from the Nicomachean Ethics provide any evidence that Aristotle discussed free choice – as is not infrequently assumed. The result is that they do not, and that the claim that they do tends to be based on a mistranslation of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3. Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics, Books Viii and Ix.Michael Pakaluk (ed.) - 1998 - Clarendon Press.
    Michael Pakaluk presents the first systematic study in English of Books VIII and IX of Aristotle's masterpiece of moral philosophy, the Nicomachean Ethics; these books comprise one of the most famous of all discussions of friendship. Pakaluk accompanies his fresh and accurate translation with a philosophical commentary which unfolds lucidly the various arguments in the text, assuming no knowledge of Greek on the part of the reader.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4. Acting Virtuously as an End in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.Sukaina Hirji - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (6):1006-1026.
    Sometimes, in the Nicomachean Ethics (NE), Aristotle describes virtuous actions as the sorts of actions that are ends; it is important for Aristotle to do so if he wants to maintain, as he seems to at least until NE 10.7-8, that virtuous actions are a constituent of eudaimonia. At other times, he claims that virtuous actions are the sorts of actions that are for the sake of ends beyond themselves; after all, no one would choose to go into (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5. Pleasure as Perfection: Nicomachean Ethics X.4-5.Strohl Matthew - 2011 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 41:257-287.
    I argue that Aristotle took pleasure to be a certain aspect of perfect activities of awareness, namely, their very perfection. I also argue that this reading facilitates an attractive interpretation of his view that pleasures differ in kind along with the activities they arise in connection with.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6. External Goods and the Complete Exercise of Virtue in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics.Sukaina Hirji - 2021 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 103 (1):29-53.
    In Nicomachean Ethics 1.8, Aristotle seems to argue that certain external goods are needed for happiness because, in the first place, they are needed for virtuous activity. This has puzzled scholars. After all, it seems possible for a virtuous agent to exercise her virtuous character even under conditions of extreme hardship or deprivation. Indeed, it is natural to think these are precisely the conditions under which one's virtue shines through most clearly. Why then does Aristotle think that a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Nicomachean Ethics VI.9: Good Deliberation and Phronesis.Angelo Antonio Pires De Oliveira - 2017 - Princípios: Revista de Filosofia 24 (44):9-41.
    In this paper, I put under scrutiny the arguments put forward by Aristotle in Nicomachean Ethics (NE) VI.9. The paper has two main parts. In the first, I examine the NE VI.9’s first part where Aristotle develops the concept of good deliberation, offering its definition in 1142b27-28. In the second, I examine the connection between good deliberation and phronesis, and, then, I discuss the vexata quæstio about if the lines 1142b31-33 might be read as introducing the claim that (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Protreptic Aspects of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.Monte Johnson & D. S. Hutchinson - 2014 - In Ronald Polansky (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 383-409.
    We hope to show that the overall protreptic plan of Aristotle's ethical writings is based on the plan he used in his published work Protrepticus (Exhortation to Philosophy), by highlighting those passages that primarily offer hortatory or protreptic motivation rather than dialectical argumentation and analysis, and by illustrating several ways that Aristotle adapts certain arguments and examples from his Protrepticus. In this essay we confine our attention to the books definitely attributable to the Nicomachean Ethics (thus excluding the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. The Best Regime of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics.Thornton C. Lockwood Jr - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):355-370.
    My paper argues that the Nicomachean Ethics endorses kingship (basileia) as the best regime (aristê politeia). In order to justify such a claim, I look at Aristotle’s discussion and rankings of regimes throughout the Ethics, specifically, the discussions of regime division in EN VIII.10, the inculcation of virtue in II.1, ethical habituation in X.9, and the “one regime which is best everywhere according to nature” in V.7.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10. Degrees of Virtue in the Nicomachean Ethics.Doug Reed - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):91-112.
    I argue that Aristotle believes that virtue comes in degrees. After dispatching with initial concerns for the view, I argue that we should accept it because Aristotle conceives of heroic virtue as the highest degree of virtue. I support this interpretation of heroic virtue by considering and rejecting alternative readings, then showing that heroic virtue characterized as the highest degree of virtue is consistent with the doctrine of the mean.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11. Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and Protestantism.David S. Sytsma - 2021 - Academia Letters 1650:1-8.
    This is a brief introduction to the origin and development of Protestant ethical works in the tradition of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Aristotle on the Best Good: Is Nicomachean Ethics 1094a18-22 Fallacious?Peter Vranas - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (2):116-128.
    The first sentence of NE I.2 has roughly the form: "If A [there is a universal end] and B, then D [this end will be the best good]". According to some commentators, Aristotle uses B to infer A; but then the sentence is fallacious. According to other commentators, Aristotle does not use B ; but then the sentence is bizarre. Contrary to both sets of commentators, I suggest that Aristotle uses B together with A to infer validly that there is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13.  7
    Happiness in Nicomachean Ethics.George Colang - 2021 - Theleologicae - International Journal of Postmodern Studies 1 (1):1-7.
    In the following work, I will try to trace, in general lines, the way in which the matter of happiness is perceived in The Nicomachean Ethics. At the same time, I will also touch on the subject of the perspectives that emerge and reflect from the considered work. For that matter, I will follow the way in which Aristotle has enunciated the matter, so that then call into requisition various perspectives in order to emphasize that happiness can’t be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Found in Translation: Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics 3.5, 1113b7-8 and its Reception.Susanne Bobzien - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 45:103-148.
    ABSTRACT: This paper is distinctly odd. It demonstrates what happens when an analytical philosopher and historian of philosophy tries their hand at the topic of reception. For a novice to this genre, it seemed advisable to start small. Rather than researching the reception of an author, book, chapter, section or paragraph, the focus of the paper is on one sentence: Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics 3.5, 1113b7-8. This sentence has markedly shaped scholarly and general opinion alike with regard to Aristotle’s (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. The Limits of Eudaimonia in the Nicomachean Ethics.Schwartz Daniel - 2016 - Journal of Greco-Roman Studies 55 (3):35-52.
    In Book I of his Nicomachean Ethics (NE), Aristotle defines happiness, or eudaimonia, in accordance with an argument he makes regarding the distinctive function of human beings. In this paper, I argue that, despite this argument, there are moments in the NE where Aristotle appeals to elements of happiness that don’t follow from the function argument itself. The place of these elements in Aristotle’s account of happiness should, therefore, be a matter of perplexity. For, how can Aristotle appeal (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. A Topical Bibliography of Scholarship on Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics: 1880 to 2004.Thornton C. Lockwood - 2005 - Journal of Philosophical Research 30:1-116.
    Scholarship on Aristotle’s NICOMACHEAN ETHICS (hereafter “the Ethics”) flourishes in an almost unprecedented fashion. In the last ten years, universities in North America have produced on average over ten doctoral dissertations a year that discuss the practical philosophy that Aristotle espouses in his Nicomachean Ethics, Eudemian Ethics, and Politics. Since the beginning of the millennium there have been three new translations of the entire Ethics into English alone, several more that translate parts of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  26
    Aristotle's Conception of Justice in Nicomachean Ethics, and Politics.Ramadan Alatrsh - manuscript
    Aristotle's fundamental viewpoint on the conception of justice is founded on the knowledge of the good, which is related to the ethical virtues in Nicomachean Ethics and is divided into two parts: universal justice and specific justice. In Politics, on the other hand, Aristotle identifies justice as the inherent nature of just citizens, stating, "The political good is justice, and this is a common advantage" in both Nicomachean Ethics and Politics.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  81
    A Troublesome Passage in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics Iii 5.Walter R. Ott - 2000 - Ancient Philosophy 20 (1):99-107.
    Pace much of the literature, I argue that Aristotle endorses what I call the ‘strong link thesis’: the claim that virtuous and vicious acts are voluntary just in case the character states from which they flow are voluntary. I trace the strong link thesis to Plato’s Laws, among other texts, and show how it functions in key arguments of both philosophers.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  46
    Topical Bibliography to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.Thornton Lockwood - 2014 - In Ronald Polansky (ed.), Cambridge Companion to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. New York, NY, USA: pp. 428-464.
    Topical bibliography of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, organized by books/subjects within the Ethics. Includes editions and lexica for the study of Aristotle's Eudemian Ethics and Magna Moralia.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Aristotle on Blaming Animals: Taking the Hardline Approach on Voluntary Action in the Nicomachean Ethics III.1–5.Paul E. Carron - 2019 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (2):381-397.
    This essay offers a reconstruction of Aristotle’s account of the voluntary in the Nicomachean Ethics, arguing that the voluntary grounds one notion of responsibility with two levels, and therefore both rational and non-rational animals are responsible for voluntary actions. Aristotle makes no distinction between causal and moral responsibility in the NE; rather, voluntariness and prohairesis form different bases for responsibility and make possible different levels of responsibility, but both levels of responsibility fall within the ethical sphere and are (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Observations on Vat. Barb. Gr. 75, a Neglected MS of the Nicomachean Ethics.Kyle Oskvig - 2018 - Classical Philology 113 (3):340-352.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  18
    Review of Miller, Ed., Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. A Critical Guide. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2012 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 6:32.
    The nature of the edited scholarly collection has undergone a sea change. Whereas once upon a time edited collections brought together conference papers or previously published landmark studies—whose mark of excellence is scholarly rigor—more recently libraries have been inundated by Guides, Companions, and Handbooks. The Guide/Companion/Handbook model has its uses, perhaps especially for introductory essays or overviews of topics in which clarity, rather than cutting-edge scholarship, is the mark of excellence. Between these two models falls a new and somewhat unprecedented (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  71
    Review of Pakaluk, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics: An Introduction. [REVIEW]Thornton C. Lockwood Jr - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):435-439.
    Introducing Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics to undergraduates, which is the explicit goal of Michael Pakaluk’s volume, is both easy and difficult. On one level, Aristotle’s text takes a common-sense view of human goodness and the qualities productive of it, a view which resonates with students when they reflect upon the general question of what they seek in life or whom they admire. Topics such as friendship, recognition (a.k.a., ‘honor’), self-improvement, and well-being are part of every student’s lived-experience and Aristotle’s (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  59
    Political Justice in Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics" and "Politics".Thornton C. Lockwood - 2004 - Dissertation, Boston University
    In the center of the fifth book of the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle elliptically characterizes political justice as a form of reciprocal rule that exists between free and equal persons pursuing a common life directed toward self-sufficiency under the rule of law. My dissertation analyzes Aristotle's thematic treatments of political justice in the Nicomachean Ethics and Politics in order to elucidate its meaning, clarify its relationship to the other forms of justice that he also discusses, and compare (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  80
    Is the Life of a Mediocre Philosopher Better Than the Life of an Excellent Cobbler? Aristotle On the Value of Activity in Nicomachean Ethics X.4-8.David Machek - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-17.
    Insofar as living well is, for Aristotle, the ultimate end of human life, and insofar as our life can be understood as comprising different (energeiai), the key prerequisite for living well is to rank and choose different activities according to their real value. The objective of this article is to identify and discuss different considerations that determine an value in ethics. Focusing on selected passages from Nicomachean Ethics X, I argue that the structure of an value displays (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  62
    Contemplation and Self–Awareness in the Nicomachean Ethics.Matthew D. Walker - 2010 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 7:221-238.
    I explore Aristotle’s account in the Nicomachean Ethics of how agents attain self-awareness through contemplation. I argue that Aristotle sets up an account of self-awareness through contemplating friends in Books VIII-IX that completes itself in Book X’s remarks on theoretical contemplation. I go on to provide an account of how contemplating the divine, on Aristotle’s view, elicits self-awareness.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Magnanimity, Mεγαλοψυχία, and the System of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics.Eckart Schütrumpf - 1989 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 71 (1):10-22.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  70
    Another Dissimilarity Between Moral Virtue and Skills: An Interpretation of Nicomachean Ethics II 4.Javier Echenique - 2018 - In Marcelo Boeri, Y. Kanayama & Jorge Mittelmann (eds.), Soul and Mind in Greek Thought. Psychologial Issues in Plato and Aristotle. Springer. pp. 199-215.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. The Practical Life, the Contemplative Life, and the Perfect Eudaimonia in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics 10.7-8.Timothy Roche - 2019 - Logos and Episteme 10 (1):31-49.
    Two views continue to be defended today. One is that the account of eudaimonia in EN 10 is inconsistent with claims made about it in other books of the work. The other view is that the account in EN 10 is consistent with other claims made in the other books because Aristotle presents one account of perfect eudaimonia by portraying it as consisting solely in contemplative activity. I call this view the intellectualist interpretation. I then argue that neither view is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  15
    A Battle Against Pain? Aristotle, Theophrastus and the Physiologoi in Aspasius, On Nicomachean Ethics 156.14-20.Wei Cheng - 2017 - Phronesis 62 (4):392-416.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  30
    Jon Miller, Ed., Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics: A Critical Guide , X + 290 Pp., $85.00. ISBN 9780521514484. [REVIEW]Matthew D. Walker - 2013 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 30 (1):176-180.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Review of C.D.C. Reeve, Aristotle on Practical Wisdom: Nicomachean Ethics VI. [REVIEW]Samuel H. Baker - 2015 - Philosophy in Review 35 (2):106-108.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. What's Aristotelian About Neo‐Aristotelian Virtue Ethics?Sukaina Hirji - 2019 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 98 (3):671-696.
    It is commonly assumed that Aristotle's ethical theory shares deep structural similarities with neo-Aristotelian virtue ethics. I argue that this assumption is a mistake, and that Aristotle's ethical theory is both importantly distinct from the theories his work has inspired, and independently compelling. I take neo-Aristotelian virtue ethics to be characterized by two central commitments: (i) virtues of character are defined as traits that reliably promote an agent's own flourishing, and (ii) virtuous actions are defined as the sorts (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. The Metaphysics of Goodness in the Ethics of Aristotle.Samuel H. Baker - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (7):1839-1856.
    Kraut and other neo-Aristotelians have argued that there is no such thing as absolute goodness. They admit only good in a kind, e.g. a good sculptor, and good for something, e.g. good for fish. What is the view of Aristotle? Mostly limiting myself to the Nicomachean Ethics, I argue that Aristotle is committed to things being absolutely good and also to a metaphysics of absolute goodness where there is a maximally best good that is the cause of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  35. Luck in Aristotle's Physics and Ethics.Monte Johnson - 2015 - In Devin Henry & K. Nielson (eds.), Bridging the Gap between Aristotle's Science and Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 254-275.
    I discuss how Aristotle’s formulation of the problem of moral luck relates to his natural philosophy. I review well-known passages from Nicomachean Ethics I/X and Eudemian Ethics I/VII and Physics II, but in the main focus on EE VII 14 (= VIII 2). I argue that Aristotle’s position there (rejecting the elimination of luck, but reducing luck so far as possible to incidental natural and intelligent causes) is not only consistent with his treatment of luck in Physics (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  51
    Language of Ethics in Aristotle.Mostafa Younesie - manuscript
    Here I will explore Books One-Four of "Nicomachean Ethics" in order to see Aristotle conception of the Ethics language. Aristotle believes in plurality of methods and accordingly ethics as a discipline of knowledge should have its own subject, end and method. Such a complexity shapes a specific language for ethics but it is scattered in his treatise and in this paper I want to collect them in one place.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  37
    Wollstonecraft’s Feminist Virtue Ethics: Friendship and the Good Society.Justin P. Holt - 2021 - Academia Letters 717 (717):1-6.
    This paper will show that Mary Wollstonecraft developed a modern feminist version of virtue ethics. Virtue ethics is an all-encompassing moral theory which holds that the best life for individuals is commensurate with a good society. Simply, self-interest and our public duties are argued as identical and not at odds when we realize what is truly good for ourselves and for others. In the Western philosophic cannon, the most common version of virtue ethics is Aristotle’s, with the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. John Calvin and Virtue Ethics: Augustinian and Aristotelian Themes.David S. Sytsma - 2020 - Journal of Religious Ethics 48 (3):519-556.
    Many scholars have argued that the Protestant Reformation generally departed from virtue ethics, and this claim is often accepted by Protestant ethicists. This essay argues against such discontinuity by demonstrating John Calvin’s reception of ethical concepts from Augustine and Aristotle. Calvin drew on Augustine’s concept of eudaimonia and many aspects of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics , including concepts of choice, habit, virtue as a mean, and the specific virtues of justice and prudence. Calvin also evaluated the problem of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Scholarship on Aristotle's Ethical and Political Philosophy (2011-2020).Thornton Lockwood - manuscript
    In anticipation of updating annotated bibliographies on Aristotle’s Ethics and Politics for Oxford Bibliography Online, I have sought to keep a running tabulation of all books, edited collections, translations, and journal articles which are primarily devoted to Aristotle’s ethical and political writings (including their historical reception but excluding neo–Aristotelian virtue ethics). In general, criteria for inclusion in this bibliography are that the work be: (1) publication in a peer–reviewed or academic/university press between 2011–2020; (2) “substantially” devoted to one (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  20
    Comments on Flanner's "Force and Compulsion in Aristotle's Ethics".Thornton Lockwood - 2007 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 22:61-66.
    Aristotle’s notion of force seems to be the same as what we mean by “brute force,” or as an example of the Eudemian Ethics puts it, one is “forced” when one’s hand is literally seized by another and used to strike another person. But closer scrutiny suggests something else must be going on if for no other reason than that Aristotle, in his description of force, makes reference to a do-er (o( pra/ttwn [EN III.1.1110a2]). Based on such an insight, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  43
    Review of Gottlieb, The Virtue of Aristotle’s Ethics[REVIEW]Thornton C. Lockwood Jr - 2011 - International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (3):418-420.
    In his Metaphysics of Morals, Kant famously wrote “The distinction between virtue and vice can never be sought in the degree to which one follows certain maxims…In other words, the well-known principle (Aristotle’s) that locates virtue in the mean between two vices is false.” Kant is not the first (or the last) thinker to take to task Aristotle’s doctrine of the mean, but he is representative of a line of criticism of Aristotle’s doctrine which argues that ethics is the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  34
    Habituation, Habit, and Character in Aristotle’s Ethics.Thornton Lockwood - 2013 - In Tom Sparrow (ed.), The History of Habit. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 19-36.
    The opening words of the second book of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics are as familiar as any in his corpus: Excellence of character results from habituation [ethos]—which is in fact the source of the name it has acquired [êthikê], the word for ‘character-trait’ [êthos] being a slight variation of that for ‘habituation’ [ethos]. This makes it quite clear that none of the excellences of character [êthikê aretê] comes about in us by nature; for no natural way of being is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  26
    Review of Keyt, Nature and Justice: Studies in the Ethical and Political Philosophy of Plato and Aristotle. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2017 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 11:02.
    For the last four decades, David Keyt has devoted substantial scholarly energy to the reconstruction of political and ethical arguments in Aristotle’s <i>Nicomachean Ethics</i> and <i>Politics</i>, and to a lesser degree the same in Plato’s <i>Republic</i>. Although Keyt’s translation of and commentary on <i>Politics</i> Books V and VI in the Aristotle Clarendon series (1999), to my mind, is his most substantial contribution to ancient philosophy scholarship, close competitors are his scholarly articles which seek to reconstruct the philosophical positions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  86
    Phantasía logistikē en la configuración del deseo en Aristóteles1.Claudia Carbonell - 2013 - Ideas Y Valores 62 (152).
    In De Anima III 10, Aristotle introduces the notion of phantasía logistikē as one of the principles of rational action. On the basis of some texts from De Anima and the Nicomachean Ethics, the paper seeks to interpret the place of that type of imagination in practical reasoning. To that e ect, it rst sets forth Aristotle’s doctrine regarding the principles of action and the issue of their articulation, and then goes on to discuss the role of rational (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. Choice and Moral Responsibility in Nichomachean Ethics III 1–5.Susanne Bobzien - 2014 - In R. Polansky (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. New York, USA: Cambridge University Press. pp. 81-109.
    ABSTRACT: This paper serves two purposes: (i) it can be used by students as an introduction to chapters 1-5 of book iii of the NE; (ii) it suggests an answer to the unresolved question what overall objective this section of the NE has. The paper focuses primarily on Aristotle’s theory of what makes us responsible for our actions and character. After some preliminary observations about praise, blame and responsibility (Section 2), it sets out in detail how all the key notions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  46.  75
    The Function Argument in the Eudemian Ethics.Roy C. Lee - forthcoming - Ancient Philosophy.
    This paper reconstructs the function argument of Aristotle’s Eudemian Ethics ii 1. The argument (1) seeks to define happiness through the method of dichotomous division; (2) shows that the highest good is better than all four of the goods of the soul, not only two, as commentators have thought; and (3) secures its conclusion without invoking the human function, sidestepping a fallacious inference alleged of the Nicomachean argument.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. The Concept of Ergon: Towards An Achievement Interpretation of Aristotle's 'Function Argument'.Samuel H. Baker - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 48:227-266.
    In Nicomachean Ethics 1. 7, Aristotle gives a definition of the human good, and he does so by means of the “ ergon argument.” I clear the way for a new interpretation of this argument by arguing that Aristotle does not think that the ergon of something is always the proper activity of that thing. Though he has a single concept of an ergon, Aristotle identifies the ergon of an X as an activity in some cases but a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48. Aristotle on the Heterogeneity of Pleasure.Matthew Strohl - 2018 - In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: A History.
    In Nicomachean Ethics X.5, Aristotle gives a series of arguments for the claim that pleasures differ from one another in kind in accordance with the differences in kind among the activities they arise in connection with. I develop an interpretation of these arguments based on an interpretation of his theory of pleasure (which I have defended elsewhere) according to which pleasure is the perfection of perfect activity. In the course of developing this interpretation, I reconstruct Aristotle’s phenomenology of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  51
    Competing Ways of Life and Ring-Composition in NE X 6-8.Thornton Lockwood - 2014 - In Ronald Polansky (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. Cambridge, UK: pp. 350-369.
    The closing chapters of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics x are regularly described as “puzzling,” “extremely abrupt,” “awkward,” or “surprising” to readers. Whereas the previous nine books described—sometimes in lavish detail—the multifold ethical virtues of an embodied person situated within communities of family, friends, and fellow-citizens, NE x 6-8 extol the rarified, god-like and solitary existence of a sophos or sage (1179a32). The ethical virtues that take up approximately the first half of the Ethics describe moral exempla who experience (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Phronesis e Virtude do Caráter em Aristóteles: comentários a Ética a Nicômaco VI.Lucas Angioni - 2011 - Dissertatio 34:303-345.
    These are commentaries to the translation into Portuguese of Nicomachean Ethics VI, found in the same volume of Dissertatio.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
1 — 50 / 998