Results for 'Poet'

122 found
Order:
  1. The Poet as ‘Worldmaker’: T.S. Eliot and the Religious Imagination.Dominic Griffiths - 2015 - In Francesca Knox & David Lonsdale (eds.), The Power of the Word: Poetry and the Religious Imagination. Ashgate. pp. 161-175.
    Martin Heidegger defines the world as ‘the ever non-objective to which we are subject as long as the paths of birth and death . . . keep us transported into Being’. He writes that the world is ‘not the mere collection of the countable or uncountable, familiar and unfamiliar things that are at hand . . . The world worlds’. Being able to fully and richly express how the world worlds is the task of the artist, whose artwork is the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Plato: Poet: Lysis: Poem.Ginger Osborn - 1995 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  67
    Professor Puran Singh: Scientist, Poet and Philosopher. [REVIEW]Devinder Pal Singh - 2009 - Abstracts of Sikh Studies 11:1-4.
    Professor Puran Singh, a unique synthesis of a poet, philosopher and scientist, rose like a celestial star on the firmament of modern Indian literature. The many splendored personality of this great chemist, mystic poet, visionary and interpreter of the Sikh cultural consciousness still beckons scholars to explore the extent of his vision in various fields. After a splendid in-depth study of the Life and Work of Puran Singh, Dr. Hardev Singh Virk has made a successful attempt to unravel (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Sermons to Youth from Poet Al-Warraq.Adnan Arslan - 2018 - Tasavvur - Tekirdag Theology Journal 4 (2):826 - 838.
    al-Zuhd, one of the most prominent themes in the Arab poetry in the Abbasid period, came to the summit by the poets like Abū l-ʻAtāhiyya and Abū Nuwās. Another important poem known with his poems on al-Zuhd is Mahmud al-Warraq. Warrak, after a youth life in pleasure, understood the s of life and apply himself to poetry on zuhd. Warrak produced a number of different works in verse form. He was distinguished by the sincerity in his statements and the simple (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Publıcatıon and Analysıs of Poetıc Forty-Hadıth Translatıon by Naw’ı of Malkara.Ali Sever - 2018 - Tasavvur - Tekirdag Theology Journal 4 (1):219 - 256.
    The affection of the Prophet by the ummah (belivers) contributed to keep his words on the agenda so that various formations had emerged. these formations displayed themselves especially in the field of literature. Specifically, variety in the forty hadith literature can be example of this. New‘î who was the literary man and professor of Ottoman’s in the 16. Century and produced the Works of İslamic Science and literature. In this study, the work of New‘î which is about the forty hadith (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  88
    As a Historian of Religions Poet Asaf Hâlet Çelebi and Religious Motives in Poetry.Necati SÜMER - 2019 - Mevzu - Journal of Social Sciences (2):129-166.
    Asaf Halet Çelebi, who is a poet interested in Eastern religions. This is due to reach the family atmosphere, the love to know different languages and mysticism. What makes him different aspects of Turkish literature, the history of religions is the masterful use of motifs in his poems. Religions, mythology, mysticism and music information about the poet, his poetry reflects this versatility. Sound in poetry, harmony, knowledge, symbols, and images of compliance on this issue reveals the talent of (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Book Review Srimad Bhagavata: Condensed in the Poet's Own Words by Pandit A M Srinivasachariar. [REVIEW]Swami Narasimhananda - 2010 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 115 (6):406.
    Book review of 'Srimad Bhagavata—Condensed in the Poet's Words' by A M Srinivasachariar. In this book, the Sanskrit Bhagavata verses have been condensed without using any words other those of the original. This has been translated into English by V Raghavan. This book enables one to have an idea of the main content of the lengthier original text.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Restoration of The Romantics:The Astronomer-Poet of Persia and Percy Bysshe Shelley"~ Rituparna Ray Chaudhuri.Rituparna Ray Chaudhuri - 2016
    "Then to this earthen Bowl did I adjourn My Lip the secret Well of Life to learn: And Lip to Lip it murmur'd-"While you live Drink!-for once dead you never shall return." " [http://philpapers.org/profile/112741] .
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  90
    Prevailing Winds: Marx as Romantic Poet.Joshua M. Hall - 2013 - Philosophy and Literature 37 (2):343-359.
    Inspired by Charles Taylor’s locating of Herder and Rousseau’s “expressivism” in Marx’s understanding of the human as artist, I begin this essay by examining expressivism in Taylor, followed by its counterpart in M. H. Abrams’s work, namely the wind as metaphor in British Romantic poetry. I then further explore this expressivism/wind connection in Percy Bysshe Shelley’s “Ode to the West Wind” and Marx’s The German Ideology. Ultimately I conclude that these expressive winds lead to poetic gesture per se, and thereby, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Resemblance Nominalism: A Solution to the Problem of Universals.Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    Gardeners, poets, lovers, and philosophers are all interested in the redness of roses; but only philosophers wonder how it is that two different roses can share the same property. Are red things red because they resemble each other? Or do they resemble each other because they are red? Since the 1970s philosophers have tended to favour the latter view, and held that a satisfactory account of properties must involve the postulation of either universals or tropes. But Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra revives the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   104 citations  
  11. Anarchism and the Beats.Ed D’Angelo - 2012 - In Sharin Elkholy (ed.), The Philosophy of the Beats. The University Press of Kentucky. pp. 227-242.
    The paper charts both the interpersonal connections between historical anarchist figures and the beat poets as well as the philosophical similarities between them. Almost all the beat poets were anarchists, though their politics was secondary to their attempts to transform consciousness. Among the anarchists, the romantic socialist Gustav Landauer, who was especially popular in post-war American anarchist circles, came closest to the political perspective of the beat poets. Like the beats, Landauer was a poet, a pacifist, an anarchist, a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  57
    The Hill-Stream.Varanasi Ramabrahmam - 2017 - New Delhi, India: Authorspress.
    A poet is also a human being. He possesses thirst and hunger. He will have family responsibilities. He/she will have his or her social obligations. One has to take care of all these and then in their midst has to fine tune time to compose poetry. Money is essential to quench his thirst and hunger and discharge family responsibilities. These are not the times when one can make poetry-writing a livelihood. One has to do some other job and then (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. The History and Philosophy of the Postwar American Counterculture: Anarchy, the Beats and the Psychedelic Transformation of Consciousness.Ed D'Angelo - manuscript
    This is a greatly expanded version of my article "Anarchism and the Beats," which was published in the book, The Philosophy of the Beats, by the University Press of Kentucky in 2012. It is both an historical and a philosophical analysis of the postwar American counterculture. It charts the historical origins of the postwar American counterculture from the anarchists and romantic poets of the early nineteenth century to a complex network of beat poets and pacifist anarchists in the early decades (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Selected Poems of Hafiz.Ali Salami - 2017 - Tehran, Tehran Province, Iran: Mehrandish.
    Born in 1315, Shamseddin Mohammad, known as Hafiz, grew up in the city of Shiraz where he studied the Qur’anic sciences. In his youth he learned the Quran rigorously and assumed the epithet ‘Hafiz’ which means the one who knows the Quran by heart. Also known as the ‘Tongue of the Hidden’ and the ‘Interpreter of Secrets’, Hafiz utilizes grand religious ideas and mingles them with Sufistic teachings, thereby creating a kind of poetry which baffles interpretation. The poetry of Hafiz (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  52
    Revolutionary Poetry and Liquid Crystal Chemistry: Herman Gorter, Ada Prins and the Interface Between Literature and Science.Hub Zwart - 2020 - Foundations of Chemistry 23 (1):1-18.
    In the Netherlands, the poet Herman Gorter is mostly known as the author of the neo-romantic poem May and the “sensitivistic” Poems, but internationally he became famous as a propagandist of radical Marxism: the author of influential brochures and of an “open letter” to comrade W.I. Lenin in 1920. During the 1890s, Gorter became increasingly dissatisfied with his poetry, considering it as ego-centric, disinterested and “bourgeois”, unconnected with what was happening in the real world. He wanted to put his (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. “It Doesn’T... Matter Where You Begin”: Pound and Santayana on Education.Martin Coleman - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (4):1-17.
    American poet Ezra Pound wrote a letter on February 6, 1940, inviting American philosopher George Santayana to join poet T. S. Eliot and himself in writing “a volume . . . on the Ideal University, or The Proper Curriculum, or how it would be possible to educate and/or (mostly or) civilize the university student.” Santayana declined the invitation and claimed to have no ideas on the subject of education. Participation would have been morally impossible, he wrote, because unlike (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  10
    The Exile of Pessoa & Camus.Venkat Ramanan - 2019 - The Punch Magazine 1.
    Poet and philosopher Fernando Pessoa (1888-1935) described himself as someone who is an “exile from the country of which he had always considered himself a citizen…” Is it apposite to associate exile with someone who — apart from spending nine years in South Africa during his youth — essentially never stirred out of his native Portugal? This essay examines this question by comparing Pessoa to another famous exile, Albert Camus.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. ANALYSIS OF PARADISE LOST, BOOK-I~ The Critical Evaluation.Rituparna Ray Chaudhuri - 2017
    “Three poets in three distant ages born Greece, Italy and England did adorn; The first in loftiness of thought surpassed. The second in majesty; in both the last.” (http://philpapers.org/profile/112741).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. “The Event That Was Nothing”: Miscarriage as a Liminal Event.Alison Reiheld - 2015 - Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (1):9-26.
    I argue that miscarriage, referred to by poet Susan Stewart as “the event that was nothing,” is a liminal event along four distinct and inter-related dimensions: parenthood, procreation, death, and induced abortion. It is because of this liminality that miscarriage has been both poorly addressed in our society, and enrolled in larger debates over women's reproduction and responsibility for reproduction, both conceptually and legally. If miscarriage’s liminality were better understood, if miscarriage itself were better theorized, perhaps it would not (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  20. Expression And Expressiveness In Art.Jenefer Robinson - 2007 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 4 (2):19-41.
    The concept of expression in the arts is Janus-faced. On the one hand expression is an author-centered notion: many Romantic poets, painters, and musicians thought of themselves as pouring our or ex-pressing their own emotions in their artworks. And on the other hand, expression is an audience-centered notion, the communication of what is expressed by an author to members of an audience. Typically the word “expression” is used for the author-centered aspect of expression as a whole, and the word “expressiveness” (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  21. Peer Review — An Insult to the Reader and to Society: Milton's View.Steven James Bartlett - 2017 - Willamette University Faculty Research Website.
    Pre-publication certification through peer review stands in need of philosophical examination. In this paper, philosopher-psychologist Steven James Bartlett recalls the arguments marshalled four hundred years ago by English poet John Milton against restraint of publication by the "gatekeepers of publication," AKA today's peer reviewers.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22.  28
    The Return of the Translator : From the Edge of Meaning to the Edge of Sense.Srajana Kaikini - 2017 - In Marianna Maruyama (ed.), Kunstlicht Special Issue : Translation as Method. Amsterdam, Netherlands: pp. 10 - 25.
    "Translation, as with any practice, is something to return to again and again. Opening this issue, curator and poet Srajana Kaikini’s multi-layered article, ‘The Return of the Translator’ underlines the relevance of translation as a critical process, available to anyone, in any field. Bringing in references to philosopher Sundar Sarukkai, poet Gangadhar Chittal, and Buddhist philosophical principles, she locates the place of translation. Kaikini looks closely at the ways “language and the world are in strange relation with each (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. Introduction to The New Schelling.Alistair Welchman & Judith Norman - 2004 - In Judith Norman & Alistair Welchman (eds.), The New Schelling. London, UK: pp. 1-12.
    Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling (1775-1854) is often thought of as a “philosopher’s philosopher,” with a specialist rather than generalist appeal. One reason for Schelling’s lack of popularity is that he is something of a problem case for traditional narratives about the history of philosophy. Although he is often slotted in as a stepping stone on the intellectual journey from Kant to Hegel, any attention to his ideas will show that he does not fit this role very well. His later (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  24.  61
    Heidegger and the Poetics of Time.Rebecca A. Longtin - 2017 - Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual 7:124 - 141.
    Heidegger’s engagement with the poet Friedrich Hölderlin often dwells on the issue of temporality. For Heidegger, Hölderlin is the most futural thinker (zukünftigster Denker) whose poetry is necessary for us now and must be wrested from being buried in the past. Heidegger frames his reading of Hölderlin in terms of past, present, and future and, more importantly, describes him as being able to poetize time. This paper examines what it means to poetize time and why Hölderlin’s poetry in particular (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Reason and Resonance: A History of Modern Aurality.Veit Erlmann - 2010 - Zone Books.
    Hearing has traditionally been regarded as the second sense--as somehow less rational and less modern than the first sense, sight. Reason and Resonance explodes this myth by reconstructing the process through which the ear came to play a central role in modern culture and rationality. For the past four hundred years, hearing has been understood as involving the sympathetic resonance between the vibrating air and various parts of the inner ear. But the emergence of resonance as the centerpiece of modern (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. The Transitional Breakdown of the Word: Heidegger and Stefan George's Encounter with Language.Jussi Backman - 2011 - Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual 1:54-64.
    The paper studies Heidegger's reading of the poet Stefan George (1868-1933), particularly of his poem "Das Wort" (1928), in the context of Heidegger's narrative of the history of metaphysics. Heidegger reads George's poem as expressing certain experiences with language: first, the constitutive role of language, of naming and discursive determination, in granting things stable identities; second, the unnameable and indeterminable character of language itself as a constitutive process and the concomitant insight into the human being's dependency on language and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27. Review of Bengal Partition Stories: An Unclosed Chapter. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2016 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (September):670-2.
    Bashabi Fraser is a poet in her own right. She is also a creative translator. This is a review of her edited volume on the Partition of Bengal. The review highlights our need to read the partition event as a warning for future and ongoing genocides. The review also shows the superiority of literature over history. And finally it has something to say about translation and separately, on P Lal. For instance, this reviewer in many other reviews too insists (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Authenticity, Right Relation and the Return of the Repressed Native in James Galvin’s "The Meadow".Ian K. Jensen - 2016 - Journal of Contemporary Thought 43:84-109.
    This essay reads acclaimed poet James Galvin’s 1992 semi-autobiographical novel through the lenses of Martin Heidegger’s notion of authenticity and Patrick Wolfe’s discussion of settler-colonialism. I argue that Lyle, arguably the novel’s main character, is portrayed as living “authentically” in contrast to the deep inauthenticity of Ferris. I connect Western authentic dwelling with settler-colonial logic, centering my account on the figures of the “lazy” and “magical” “Indian.” Ultimately, I find that far from rejecting settler-colonial logic Galvin’s text plays out (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  37
    Revolutionary Poetry and Liquid Crystal Chemistry: Herman Gorter, Ada Prins and the Interface Between Literature and Science.Hub Zwart - 2021 - Foundations of Chemistry 23 (1):115-132.
    In the Netherlands, the poet Herman Gorter is mostly known as the author of the neo-romantic poem May and the “sensitivistic” Poems, but internationally he became famous as a propagandist of radical Marxism: the author of influential brochures and of an “open letter” to comrade W.I. Lenin in 1920. During the 1890s, Gorter became increasingly dissatisfied with his poetry, considering it as ego-centric, disinterested and “bourgeois”, unconnected with what was happening in the real world. He wanted to put his (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. The Philosophy of Imagination and William Blake's Jesus.Peter Klapes - 2019 - Falsafa (University of California Irvine) 2:21-29.
    The artist-poet William Blake claims that “Jesus & his Apostles & Disciples were all Artists.” Blake committed his artistic career to religious writing, and gave rise to a new Christianity, which better encapsulated the realities of the existential human condition. In what follows, I will explore Blake’s philosophy of religion and of imagination. Through an explication of Blake’s meta-poetry, I aim to illuminate Blake’s depictions of the connection between the imagination and religion. In devising a Blakean philosophy of imagination, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Bohdan Boichuk’s Childhood Reveries: A Migrant’s Nostalgia, or, Documenting Pain in Poetry.Maria G. Rewakowicz - 2018 - Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 5:133-142.
    This paper examines Bohdan Boichuk’s poetry by looking into the role his childhood memories played in forming his poetic imagination. Displaced by World War II, the poet displays a unique capacity to transcend his traumatic experiences by engaging in creative writing. Eyewitnessing war atrocities perpetrated by the Nazis does not destroy his belief in the healing power of poetry; on the contrary, it makes him appreciate poetry as the only existentially worthy enterprise. Invoking Gaston Bachelard’s classic work The Poetics (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. Bangla Sahityer Anginay Anurupa Devi.Raju Layek - 2013 - Pratidhwani the Echo.
    Anurupa Devi (9th September 1882 – 19th April 1958) is one of the famous names in Bengali literature. She was a Bengali novelist, short story writer, poet and also a social worker. She was one of the women writers in Bengali to gain considerable prominence. She was the daughters of Mukunda Mukhopadhyay. Bhudeb Mukhopadhyay was her grandfather. Up to the middle of nineteenth century the women of the Indian Society were deprived from education and they were restricted within house (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. "A Survey of Metaphysics" by E.J. Lowe and "Metaphysics: Contemporary Readings" Edited by Michael J. Loux. [REVIEW]Tim Crane - 2002 - The Times Higher Education Supplement 1.
    Philosophy, that most misunderstood of intellectual pursuits, is often mocked; and no part of philosophy is as often mocked as metaphysics. The image of the ‘speculative metaphysician’ dreaming up abstract pictures of the world has been held up for ridicule by poets, playwrights, novelists, journalists as well as by other philosophers. The Logical Positivists in the first half of the 20th Century rejected all metaphysical speculations as ‘meaningless’ since they could not be verified by scientific experiment; in the later part (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  35
    Romanian Diplomatic Envoys to the United States of America.Alexandru Cristian - unknown - Encyclopedia of Romanian-American Relations.
    The very first permanent Romanian representation to the United States of America was established in Washington D.C. pursuant to the Royal Decree no. 1027 of 24 September 1917, led by Dr. Constantin Angelescu (1869-1948) in capacity as of head of legation with the rank of plenipotentiary minister. The game of history made it so that he took office on 15 January 1918 – the birth anniversary of our great Romanian poet Mihai Eminescu. The Secretary of the legation was Prince (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  72
    Ritratto dell'anima del mondo.Luca Sciortino (ed.) - 2019 - Padua, Province of Padua, Italy: Editrice Il Torchio.
    In different versions, from Heraclitus to Plato and from Plotinus to the Romantic poets, many thinkers have put forward the idea that the universe has a soul, the so called anima mundi. If the soul of a human being can be thought as the totality of the traits which form character and personality, that of the universe too can be imagined as a complex of distinct traits and dispositions which can be recognised in the phenomenal world. Then, we may ask (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Louvre Museum - Paintings.Nicolae Sfetcu - 2018 - Drobeta Turnu Severin: MultiMedia Publishing.
    The Louvre Museum is the largest of the world's art museums by its exhibition surface. These represent the Western art of the Middle Ages in 1848, those of the ancient civilizations that preceded and influenced it (Oriental, Egyptian, Greek, Etruscan and Roman), and the arts of early Christians and Islam. At the origin of the Louvre existed a castle, built by King Philip Augustus in 1190, and occupying the southwest quarter of the current Cour Carrée. In 1594, Henri IV decided (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  53
    Examining the Translations of Forough Farrokhzad’s Selected Poems by a Native and a Non-Native Speaker Using Vinay and Darbelnet’s Model.Enayat A. Shabani - 2019 - Journal of Language and Translation 9 (1):77-91.
    This study was a Persian-English comparative translation investigation on the selected poems of Forough- Farrokhzad, an influential contemporary Iranian poet. Two English translations were analyzed: one by a native Persian speaker, Sholeh Wolpé, an Iranian poet and translator, and the other by a non-native Persian speaker, Jascha Kessler, an American poet, writer and translator. The translations were reviewed according to Vinay and Darbelnet’s(1995) model which identifies two general translation strategies: direct and oblique, resembling literal versus free classifications, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  15
    Investigating Four English Translations of Selected Poems From the Bustan of Saadi Using Catford’s Theory of Shifts.Enayat A. Shabani - 2021 - Literary Interdisciplinary Research 3 (5):191-214.
    Using Catford’s shifts (1965), this study is an attempt to investigate four English translations by Clarke (1879), Davie (1882), Edwards (1911) and Wickens (1984) of selected poems from the Bustan of Saadi, the eminent Persian poet and writer. Five poems were randomly selected from the Bustan. Every line of the selected poems was investigated by the raters and placed in the related shift type specified by Catford (1965), namely level shift and category shift which in turn includes class shift, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Poetry's Secret Truth.Mark F. Sharlow -
    Poetry, it is said, can reveal truth. Yet despite the best efforts of philosophers and poets to describe this truth, very few understand what kinds of truth poetry can convey.* One fact seems clear: only a few of the truths of poetry can be captured equally well in prose. Poetry also conveys truths of a different kind — truths that seem to exist on a level entirely different level from that of ordinary, factual truth. Some poems try to teach moral (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  74
    Sublimity and Human Works: Kant on Tragedy and War.Gene Fendt - 1995 - Proceedings of the Eighth International Kant Congress 2:509-517.
    Kant admits that there are two kinds of human works that have something sublime about them, the work of the poet, e.g., tragedy, and the work of the politician, i.e., war. This paper will explore Kant's reasoning about the sublime element in these two human works.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Daniel Hermann – a Well-Travelled Prussian Humanist and His Poetic Work in Riga.Magnus Frisch - 2015 - Letonica – Humanitāru Zinātņu Žurnāls / Journal of Humantities 30:44-57.
    The Prussian Protestant Daniel Hermann is an important Neo-Latin poet. He lived from probably 1543 until 1601. Hermann studied at Königsberg, Straßburg, Basel and Wittenberg. Afterwards he served as a secretary at the Imperial Court at Vienna, later as a secretary of the city of Danzig and permanent ambassador of Danzig at the Royal Polish court during the wars against Russia. After the war he married and settled down in Riga and became the secretary of the Polish governor Cardinal (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Reconciling Religion and Philosophy: Nasir-I Khusraw's (D. 1088) Jami' Al-Hikmatayn.Khalil Andani - 2016 - In Khaled El-Rouayheb Sabine Schmidtke (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Islamic Philosophy. New York: pp. 169-181.
    Nāṣir-i Khusraw (d. 481/1088), the renowned Ismāʿīlī philosopher, poet, travel writer, and missionary (dāʿī), took on the formidable challenge of showing the essential harmony between philosophy and Ismāʿīlī doctrine in his Jāmiʿ al-ḥikmatayn (The Reconciliation of Philosophy and Religion). After introducing his life and works, this chapter explores this text’s central themes and examines the manner in which Nāṣir attempts to achieve this reconciliation. Fundamental to Nāṣir’s method is a form of spiritual hermeneutics, or taʾwīl, through which he demonstrates (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  66
    Atteone: Da Ovidio a Giordano Bruno. "Il gran cacciator divenne caccia".Guido Del Giudice - 2019 - la Biblioteca di Via Senato (2):14-18.
    In occasione del bimillenario della morte del poeta latino Ovidio, l’articolo analizza l’influenza del poema delle Metamorfosi come fonte primaria di Giordano Bruno. L’esposizione della dottrina pitagorica, esposta nel libro XV del poema, si adatta perfettamente all’ontologia del Nolano e alla sua fede nella metempsicosi. In particolare il mito di Diana e Atteone viene adottato dal filosofo, nel De gl’Heroici furori, come ideale rappresentazione della propria esperienza conoscitiva. La tormentosa vicenda del cacciatore Atteone, tramutato in cervo per aver sorpreso la (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Leopardi “Everything Is Evil”.Silvia De Toffoli - 2019 - In Andrew P. Chignell (ed.), Evil: A History. Oxford, UK: pp. 351-357.
    Giacomo Leopardi, a major Italian poet of the nineteenth century, was also an expert in evil to whom Schopenhauer referred as a “spiritual brother.” Leopardi wrote: “Everything is evil. That is to say, everything that is, is evil; that each thing exists is an evil; each thing exists only for an evil end; existence is an evil.” These and other thoughts are collected in the Zibaldone, a massive collage of heterogeneous writings published posthumously. Leopardi’s pessimism assumes a polished form (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Reality Is Not a Solid. Poetic Transfigurations of Stevens’ Fluid Concept of Reality.Jakub Mácha - 2018 - In Kacper Bartczak & Jakub Mácha (eds.), Wallace Stevens: Poetry, Philosophy, and Figurative Language. Berlin: Peter Lang. pp. 61-92.
    The main aim of this essay is to show that, for Stevens, the concept of reality is very fluctuating. The essay begins with addressing the relationship between poetry and philosophy. I argue, contra Critchley, that Stevens’ poetic work can elucidate, or at least help us to understand better, the ideas of philosophers that are usually considered obscure. The main “obscure” philosophical work introduced in and discussed throughout the essay is Schelling’s System of Transcendental Idealism. Both a (shellingian) philosopher and a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Aesthetic Worlds: Rimbaud, Williams and Baroque Form.William Melaney - 2000 - Analecta Husserliana 69:149-158.
    The sense of form that provides the modern poet with a unique experience of the literary object has been crucial to various attempts to compare poetry to other cultural activities. In maintaining similar conceptions of the relationship between poetry and painting, Arthur Rimbaud and W. C. Williams establish a common basis for interpreting their creative work. And yet their poetry is more crucially concerned with the sudden emergence of visible "worlds" containing verbal objects that integrate a new kind of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  78
    "In Search of James Joyce's 'Ulysses'".William D. Melaney - 1993 - Semiotics:391-399.
    This paper examines how semiotics, in conjunction with hermeneutics, can illuminate the structure of James Joyce's 'Ulysses' as a literary text. The paper begins with an account of two poet-critics who examined Joyce's novel in terms of classical myths and literary precedents. A crucial turning-point in the essay occurs when Jean Michel Rabate's Lacanian reading of the novel is introduced to clarify Joyce's use of the "signifier of absence" to clarify the meaning of paternity in the novel. The function (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  71
    More Than Meets The Eye: Connections Between Phenomenology And Art.Tavi Meraud - 2010 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 7 (3):25-35.
    In a letter dated 12 January 1907, written to the poet Hugo von Hofmannsthal, the philosopher Edmund Husserl presents a half-formed analogy between the artist and the phenomenologist. Husserl writes that both the artist and the phenomenologist, in their respective efforts to study the world, share the common attitude of indifference regarding the world’s existence; they both experience the world as phenomena. Both the aesthetic and phenomenological intuitions, then, are marked by the departure from the “natural” attitude, the everyday (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Barbarism: Notes on the Thought of Theodor W. Adorno.Anna-Verena Nosthoff - 2014 - Critical Legal Thinking. Law and the Political:xx.
    Adorno’s use of the term “barbarism” has probably been most often referred to in the context of his much- cited dictum that “to write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric” (Adorno 1983: 34). While, nowadays, the term is usually and fortunately presented within the broader context of his works, his intended meaning was frequently misunderstood particularly after Adorno had articulated it for the first time. For clarity, the aforementioned dictum was not a verdict intended to silence poets or artists. It was (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Review of The Complete Works of W. H. Auden: Prose: Volume VI, 1969–1973. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2016 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (7 (July)):576-77.
    This review shows how Auden was a philosopher of religion and therefore, this review calls for reassessing the poet Auden as a philosopher concerned with prayer and the necessity of the transcendent in life.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 122