Results for 'Sports'

177 found
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  1.  42
    Sporting Embodiment: Sports Studies and the (Continuing) Promise of Phenomenology.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson - 2009 - Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise 1 (3):279-296.
    Whilst in recent years sports studies have addressed the calls ‘to bring the body back in’ to theorisations of sport and physical activity, the ‘promise of phenomenology’ remains largely under-realised with regard to sporting embodiment. Relatively few accounts are grounded in the ‘flesh’ of the lived sporting body, and phenomenology offers a powerful framework for such analysis. A wide-ranging, multi-stranded, and interpretatively contested perspective, phenomenology in general has been taken up and utilised in very different ways within different disciplinary (...)
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  2. Sport, Make-Believe, and Volatile Attitudes.Nils-Hennes Stear - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (3):275-288.
    The outcomes of sports and competitive games excite intense emotions in many people, even when those same people acknowledge that those outcomes are of trifling importance. I call this incongruity between the judged importance of the outcome and the intense reactions it provokes the Puzzle of Sport. The puzzle can be usefully compared to another puzzle in aesthetics: the Paradox of Fiction, which asks how it is we become emotionally caught up with events and characters we know to be (...)
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  3. On Sporting Integrity.Alfred Archer - 2016 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 10 (2):117-131.
    It has become increasingly popular for sports fans, pundits, coaches and players to appeal to ideas of ‘sporting integrity’ when voicing their approval or disapproval of some aspect of the sporting world. My goal in this paper will be to examine whether there is any way to understand this idea in a way that both makes sense of the way in which it is used and presents a distinctly ‘sporting’ form of integrity. I will look at three recent high-profile (...)
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  4. Sporting Supererogation and Why It Matters.Alfred Archer - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):359-373.
    A commonly accepted feature of commonsense morality is that there are some acts that are supererogatory or beyond the call of duty. Recently, philosophers have begun to ask whether something like supererogation might exist in other normative domains such as epistemology and esthetics. In this paper, I will argue that there is good reason to think that sporting supererogation exists. I will then argue that recognizing the existence of sporting supererogation is important because it highlights the value of sport as (...)
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  5. Remote Sport: Risk and Self-Knowledge in Wilder Spaces.Leslie A. Howe - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (1):1-16.
    Previous discussions on the value of sport in remote locations have concentrated on 1) environmental and process concerns, with the rejection of competition and goal-directed or use oriented activity, or 2) the value of risk and dangerous sport for self-affirmation. It is argued that the value of risk in remote sport is in self-knowledge rather than self-affirmation and that risk in remote sport, while enhancing certain kinds of experience, is not necessary. The value of remote sport is in offering the (...)
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  6. A Sporting Dilemma and its Jurisprudence.Patrick Lenta & Simon Beck - 2006 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 33 (2):125-143.
    Our purpose in this article is to draw attention to a connection that obtains between two dilemmas from two separate spheres: sports and the law. It is our contention that umpires in the game of cricket may face a dilemma that is similar to a dilemma confronted by legal decision makers and that comparing the nature of the dilemmas, and the arguments advanced to solve them, will serve to advance our understanding of both the law and games.
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  7. Sporting Embodiments: Sports Studies and the (Continuing) Promise of Phenomenology.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson - 2017 - In M. Giardina & M. Donnelly (eds.), Physical Culture, Ethnography and the Body: Theory, Method and Praxis. Abingdon, UK:
    Whilst in recent years sports studies have addressed the calls ‘to bring the body back in’ to theorisations of sport and physical activity, the ‘promise of phenomenology’ remains largely under-realised with regard to sporting embodiment. Relatively few accounts are grounded in the ‘flesh’ of the lived sporting body, and phenomenology offers a powerful framework for such analysis. A wide-ranging, multi-stranded, and interpretatively contested perspective, phenomenology in general has been taken up and utilised in very different ways within different disciplinary (...)
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  8. Enhancement in Sport, and Enhancement Outside Sport.Thomas Douglas - 2007 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 1 (1).
    Sport is one of the first areas in which enhancement has become commonplace. It is also one of the first areas in which the use of enhancement technologies has been heavily regulated. Some have thus seen sport as a testing ground for arguments about whether to permit enhancement. However, I argue that there are fairness-based objections to enhancement in sport that do not apply as strongly in some other areas of human activity. Thus, I claim that there will often be (...)
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  9.  76
    Weather-Wise? Sporting Embodiment, Weather Work and Weather Learning in Running and Triathlon.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, George Jennings, Anu Vaittinen & Helen Owton - 2019 - International Review for the Sociology of Sport 54 (7):777-792.
    Weather experiences are currently surprisingly under-explored and under-theorised in sociology and sport sociology, despite the importance of weather in both routine, everyday life and in recreational sporting and physical–cultural contexts. To address this lacuna, we examine here the lived experience of weather, including ‘weather work’ and ‘weather learning’, in our specific physical–cultural worlds of distance-running, triathlon and jogging in the United Kingdom. Drawing on a theoretical framework of phenomenological sociology, and the findings from five separate auto/ethnographic projects, we explore the (...)
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  10. Sport and the ‘National Thing’: Exploring Sport’s Emotive Significance.Jack Black - 2021 - Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics 24 (11):1956-1970.
    This article critically details how the work of Slavoj Žižek theoretically elaborates on the links between nationalism and sport. Notably, it highlights how key terms, drawn from Žižek’s work on fantasy, ideology and the Real (itself grounded in the work of Jacques Lacan), can be used to explore the relationship between sport, nationalism and enjoyment (jouissance). In outlining this approach, specific attention is given to Žižek’s account of the ‘national Thing’. Accordingly, by considering the various ways in which sport organizes, (...)
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  11. Embodied Cognition and Sport.Lawrence Shapiro & Shannon Spaulding - 2018 - In Massimiliano Cappuccio (ed.), Handbook of Embodied Cognition and Sport Psychology. MIT Press. pp. 3-22.
    Successful athletic performance requires precision in many respects. A batter stands behind home plate awaiting the arrival of a ball that is less than three inches in diameter and moving close to 100 mph. His goal is to hit it with a ba­­t that is also less than three inches in diameter. This impressive feat requires extraordinary temporal and spatial coordination. The sweet spot of the bat must be at the same place, at the same time, as the ball. A (...)
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  12.  50
    The Main Dimensions of Sport Personality Traits: A Lexical Approach.Reinout E. De Vries - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    To uncover the main dimensions of sport personality traits, a lexical study was conducted. In the first two phases, 321 adjectives denoting the way somebody practices sports were selected. In the third phase, 555 respondents self-rated the adjectives. Congruence analyses provided evidence of six factors, five of which are sport personality trait factors plus one physical individual difference factor. Marker scales from the sport personality trait factors show convergent correlations with the generic HEXACO personality obtained years earlier. Furthermore, meaningful (...)
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  13.  33
    Review of Klein, Defining Sport. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2018 - Reason Papers 40:99-104.
    Arriving at definitions in philosophy is as time-honored as it is controversial. Although learned reflection in the west about sport goes back at least to the time of ancient Greece, the sub-discipline of the philosophy of sport emerged in the world of Anglophone analytic philosophy in the 1970s. Shawn Klein’s edited volume, Defining Sport: Conceptions and Borderlines, is both the fruit of and a valuable contribution to such an emerging field (indeed, it is the first book-length study of its topic (...)
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  14. Rape as Spectator Sport and Creepshot Entertainment: Social Media and the Valorization of Lack of Consent.Kelly Oliver - 2015 - American Studies Journal (10):1-16.
    Lack of consent is valorized within popular culture to the point that sexual assault has become a spectator sport and creepshot entertainment on social media. Indeed, the valorization of nonconsensual sex has reached the extreme where sex with unconscious girls, especially accompanied by photographs as trophies, has become a goal of some boys and men.
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  15. Intention and Epochē in Tension: Autophenomenography, Bracketing and a Novel Approach to Researching Sporting Embodiment.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson - 2011 - Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health 3 (1):48-62.
    This article considers a novel approach to researching sporting embodiment via what has been termed ‘autophenomenography’. Whilst having some similarities with autoethnography, autophenomenography provides a distinctive research form, located within phenomenology as theoretical and methodological tradition. Its focus is upon the researcher’s own lived experience of a phenomenon or phenomena. This article examines some of the key elements of a sociological phenomenological approach to studying sporting embodiment in general before portraying how autophenomenography was utilised specifically within two recent research projects (...)
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  16. Not Everything is a Contest: Sport, Nature Sport, and Friluftsliv.Leslie A. Howe - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (3):437-453.
    Two prevalent assumptions in the philosophy of sport literature are that all sports are games and that all games are contests, meant to determine who is the better at the skills definitive of the sport. If these are correct, it would follow that all sports are contests and that a range of sporting activities, including nature sports, are not in fact sports at all. This paper first confronts the notion that sport and games must seek to (...)
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  17. Is Competitive Elite Sport Really Morally Corrupt?Rognvaldur Ingthorsson - 2017 - Physical Culture and Sport. Studies and Research 75 (1):05–14.
    It has been argued that competitive elite sport both (i) reduces the humanity of athletes by turning them into beings whose sole value is determined in relation to others, and (ii) is motivated by a celebration of the genetically superior and humiliation of the weak. This paper argues that while (i) is a morally reproachable attitude to competition, it is not what competitive elite sport revolves around, and that (ii) simply is not the essence of competitive elite sport. Competitive elite (...)
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  18.  87
    Agent-Regret and Sporting Glory.Jake Wojtowicz - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (2):162-176.
    When sporting agents fail through wrongful or faulty behaviour, they should feel guilty; when they fail because of a deficiency in their abilities, they should feel shame. But sometimes we fail without being deficient and without being at fault. I illustrate this with two examples of players, Moacir Barbosa and Roberto Baggio, who failed in World Cup finals and cost their teams the greatest prize in sport. Although both players failed, I suggest that neither was at fault and neither was (...)
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  19.  85
    The I in Team: Sports Fandom and the Reproduction of Identity: By Erin C. Tarver, Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2017, 233 Pp., $30 (Paperback), ISBN: 978-0-226-47013-9. [REVIEW]Jake Wojtowicz - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (3):477-487.
    In The I in Team, Erin C. Tarver argues that fandom ‘is a primary means of creating and reinforcing individual and community identities for Americans today’ and submits fandom to a critical eye...
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  20. “The Right Thing to Do?” Transformation in South African Sport.Brian Penrose - 2017 - South African Journal of Philosophy 36 (3):377-392.
    In this paper I attempt to unpack the current public debate on racial transformation in South African sport, particularly with regard to the demographic make-up of its national cricket and rugby sides. I ask whether the alleged moral imperative to undertake such transformation is, in fact, a moral imperative at all. I discuss five possible such imperatives: the need to compensate non-white South Africans for the injustices in sport’s racist history, the imperative to return the make-up of our national sides (...)
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  21.  53
    Superwomen? Young Sporting Women, Temporality, and Learning Not to Be Perfect.Noora Ronkainen, Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, Kenneth Aggerholm & Tatiana Ryba - 2020 - International Review for the Sociology of Sport (1).
    New forms of neoliberal femininity create demanding horizons of expectation for young women. For talented athletes, these pressures are intensified by the establishment of dual-career discourses that construct the combination of high-performance sport and education as a normative, ‘ideal’ pathway. The pressed time perspective inherent in dual-careers requires athletes to employ a variety of time-related skills, especially for young women who aim to live up to ‘superwoman’ ideals that valorize ‘success’ in all walks of life. Drawing on existential phenomenology, and (...)
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  22.  63
    Wax On, Wax Off! Habits, Sport Skills, and Motor Intentionality.Massimiliano Lorenzo Cappuccio, Katsunori Miyahara & Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2020 - Topoi 40 (3):609-622.
    What role does habit formation play in the development of sport skills? We argue that motor habits are both necessary for and constitutive of sensorimotor skill as they support an automatic, yet inherently intelligent and flexible, form of action control. Intellectualists about skills generally assume that what makes action intelligent and flexible is its intentionality, and that intentionality must be necessarily cognitive in nature to allow for both deliberation and explicit goal-representation. Against Intellectualism we argue that the habitual behaviours that (...)
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  23. Phenomenology is Not Phenomenalism. Is There Such a Thing as Phenomenology of Sport?Jan Halák, Ivo Jirásek & Mark Stephen Nesti - 2014 - Acta Gymnica 44 (2):117-129.
    Background: The application of the philosophical mode of investigation called “phenomenology” in the context of sport. Objective: The goal is to show how and why the phenomenological method is very often misused in the sportrelated research. Methods: Interpretation of the key texts, explanation of their meaning. Results: The confrontation of concrete sport-related texts with the original meaning of the key phenomenological notions shows mainly three types of misuse – the confusion of phenomenology with immediacy, with an epistemologically subjectivist stance (phenomenalism), (...)
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  24.  73
    Different Kinds of Perfect: The Pursuit of Excellence in Nature-Based Sports.Leslie A. Howe - 2012 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (3):353-368.
    Excellence in sport performance is normally taken to be a matter of superior performance of physical movements or quantitative outcomes of movements. This paper considers whether a wider conception can be afforded by certain kinds of nature based sport. The interplay between technical skill and aesthetic experience in nature based sports is explored, and the extent to which it contributes to a distinction between different sport-based approaches to natural environments. The potential for aesthetic appreciation of environmental engagement is found (...)
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  25. Memory Before the Game: Switching Perspectives in Imagining and Remembering Sport and Movement.John Sutton - 2012 - Journal of Mental Imagery 36 (1/2):85-95.
    This paper addresses relations between memory and imagery in expert sport in relation to visual or visuospatial perspective. Imagining, remembering, and moving potentially interact via related forms of episodic simulation, whether future- or past-directed. Sometimes I see myself engaged in action: many experts report switching between such external visual perspectives and an internal, 'own-eyes', or field perspective on their past or possible performance. Perspective in retrieval and in imagery may be flexible and multiple. I raise a range of topics for (...)
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  26.  60
    Intensity and the Sublime: Paying Attention to Self and Environment in Nature Sports.Leslie A. Howe - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (1):1-13.
    This paper responds to Kevin Krein’s claim in that the particular value of nature sports over traditional ones is that they offer intensity of sport experience in dynamic interaction between an athlete and natural features. He denies that this intensity is derived from competitive conflict of individuals and denies that nature sport derives its value from internal conflict within the athlete who carries out the activity. This paper responds directly to Krein by analysing ‘intensity’ in sport in terms of (...)
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  27. What is a Good Sports Parent?Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2010 - Nordic Journal for Applied Ethics - Etikk I Praksis 4 (1):215-232.
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  28.  38
    Skiing and its Discontents: Assessing the Turist Experience From a Psychoanalytical, a Neuroscientific and a Sport Philosophical Perspective.Hub Zwart - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):323-338.
    This article addresses the question whether skiing as a nature sport enables practitioners to develop a rapport with nature, or rather estranges and insulates them from their mountainous ambiance. To address this question, I analyse a recent skiing movie from a psychoanalytical perspective and from a neuro-scientific perspective. I conclude that Jean-Paul Sartre’s classical but egocentric account of his skiing experiences disavows the technicity involved in contemporary skiing as a sportive practice for the affluent masses, which actually represents an urbanisation (...)
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  29. Intersex Athletes: Do We Need A Gender Police In Professional Sports?Maren Behrensen - 2010 - IWM Junior Visiting Fellows' Conferences XXIX.
    Based on the case of Caster Semenya, I argue in this paper that the practice of Gender Verification Testing (GVT) in professional sports is unethical and pointless. The presumed benefit of GVT—ensuring fair competition for female athletes—is virtually nonexistent compared to its potential harms, in particular the exposure of individual athletes to a largely interphobic public. GVTs constitute a serious incursion on the athlete’s dignity, autonomy, and privacy; an incursion that cannot be justified by the appeal to fairness. My (...)
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  30. From Therapy and Enhancement to Assistive Technologies: An Attempt to Clarify the Role of the Sports Physician.Patrick Grüneberg - 2012 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (4):480-491.
    Sports physicians are continuously confronted with new biotechnological innovations. This applies not only to doping in sports, but to all kinds of so-called enhancement methods. One fundamental problem regarding the sports physician's self-image consists in a blurred distinction between therapeutic treatment and non-therapeutic performance enhancement. After a brief inventory of the sports physician's work environment I reject as insufficient the attempts to resolve the conflict of the sports physician by making it a classificatory problem. Followed (...)
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  31.  28
    Skills, Knowledge and Expertise in Sport: Edited by Breivik, Gunnar, London & New York, Routledge, 2017, $155 (Hardback), $47.95 (Paperback), $47.95 (E-Book), ISBN 13:978-1138559677. [REVIEW]Jake Wojtowicz - forthcoming - Tandf: Journal of the Philosophy of Sport:1-4.
    Review of Breivik (ed) "Skills, knowledge and expertise in sport".
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  32. On the Analogy Between Business and Sport: Towards an Aristotelian Response to The Market Failures Approach to Business Ethics.Matthew Sinnicks - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-13.
    This paper explores the notion that business calls for an adversarial ethic, akin to that of sport. On this view, because of their competitive structure, both sport and business call for behaviours that are contrary to ‘ordinary morality’, and yet are ultimately justified because of the goods they facilitate. I develop three objections to this analogy. Firstly, there is an important qualitative difference between harms risked voluntarily and harms risked involuntarily. Secondly, the goods achieved by adversarial relationships in sport go (...)
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  33.  30
    Neuro-Doping and the Value of Effort in Endurance Sports.Alexandre Erler - 2020 - Neuroethics (Suppl 2):1-13.
    The enhancement of athletic performance using procedures that increase physical ability, such as anabolic steroids, is a familiar phenomenon. Yet recent years have also witnessed the rise of direct interventions into the brain, referred to as “neuro-doping”, that promise to also enhance sports performance. This paper discusses one potential objection to neuro-doping, based on the contribution to athletic achievement, particularly within endurance sports, of effortfully overcoming inner challenges. After introducing the practice of neuro-doping, and the controversies surrounding it, (...)
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  34.  99
    Achieving Income Justice in Professional Sports: Limitation, Taxation, or Donation.Gottfried Schweiger - 2012 - Physical Culture and Sport 56 (1):12-22.
    This paper is based on the assumption that the high incomes of some professional sports athletes, such as players in professional leagues in the United States and Europe, pose an ethical problem of social justice. I deal with the questions of what should follow from this evaluation and in which ways those incomes should be regulated. I discuss three different options: a) the idea that the incomes of professional athletes should be limited, b) the idea that they should be (...)
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  35. Modelle und Grenzen der Leistungssteigerung im Sport: Enhancement, Doping, Therapie aus philosophischer Sicht.Christoph Asmuth, Benedetta Bisol & Patrick Grüneberg - 2010 - Leipziger Sportwissenschaftliche Beiträge 51 (2):8-43.
    Enhancement is a basic principle of modern sport. Their increase of achievement is usually attributed to the sportsmen’s natural assessment, their health, their training methods and their employment. In contrast, increase in output by pharmacological means is outlawed. The modern medical techniques created a whole range, by which sportsmen are supported. Consequently, sometimes difficult decisions with concrete medications develop. It is not always clearly to be differentiated whether something is a pharmacological interference, which serves the therapy or leads however to (...)
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  36. A Moral Basis for Prohibiting Performance Enhancing Drug Use in Competitive Sport.Sean McKeever - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):243-257.
    A strong moral reason for prohibiting doping in sport is to be found in the bad choices that would be faced by clean athletes in a sporting world that tolerated doping. The case against doping is not, however, to be grounded in the concept of coercion. Instead, it is grounded in a general duty of sport to afford fair opportunity to the goods that are distinctively within sport's sphere of control. The moral reason to prohibit doping need not be balanced (...)
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  37. Mindfulness, Mental Toughness, and Motivation as Correlates of College Students' Sports Involvement: Basis for a Proposed Guide for School Administrators.Raymond Anselmo - 2021 - International Journal of Academic Multidisciplinary Research (IJAMR) 5 (3):197-210.
    This research determined the correlation between the mindfulness, mental toughness, and motivation of 770 first year and second year college students and their sports involvement in one of the oldest private higher education institutions in the City of Manila. A researcher-made questionnaire was validated and pilot-tested prior to the conduct of the study. The results revealed that most of the respondents were 17 to 19 years old (75.06%) and they described their mindfulness in terms of attention and awareness as (...)
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  38.  57
    Athlete Agency and the Spirit of Olympic Sport.Heather Reid - 2020 - Journal of Olympic Studies 1 (1):22-36.
    A debate has arisen over whether “the spirit of sport” is an appropriate criterion for determining whether a substance should be banned. In this paper, I argue that the criterion is crucial for Olympic sport because Olympism celebrates humanity, specifically human agency, so we need to preserve the degree to which athletes are personally and morally responsible for their performances. This emphasis on what I call “athlete agency” is reflected metaphysically in the structure of sport, which characteristically prescribes inefficiencies in (...)
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  39.  59
    Difference Between the First Year and Second Year College Students Sports Involvement.Raymond Anselmo - 2021 - International Journal of Academic Multidisciplinary Research (IJAMR) 5 (6):69-72.
    This study investigated the difference in the sports involvement of the first year and second year college students in terms power and performance and pleasure and participation. In a sample of seven hundred seventy first year and second year college student students collected between the months of November to December 2019, in terms of power and performance during sports activities, first year respondents gave an average rating of 3.06 (Agree) while the second-year respondents gave an average rating of (...)
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  40. Football is “the Most Important of the Least Important Things”: The Illusion of Sport and COVID-19.Jack Black - 2021 - Leisure Sciences 43 (1/2):97-103..
    In his book, On the Pleasure Principle in Culture (2014), Robert Pfaller argued that our relationship to sport is one grounded in “illusion”. Simply put, our interest in and enjoyment of sport occurs through a process of “knowing better”. Here, one’s knowledge of the unimportance of sport is achieved by associating the illusion of sport with a naïve observer – i.e. someone who does believe in sport’s importance. In the wake of the global pandemic, COVID-19, it would seem that Pfaller’s (...)
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  41. The Drama of Agonistic Embodiment: Nietzschean Reflections on the Meaning of Sports.Lawrence J. Hatab - 1998 - International Studies in Philosophy 30 (3):97-107.
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  42.  75
    Vicarious Pain and Genuine Pleasure: Some Reflections on Spectator Transformation of Meaning in Sport.Leslie A. Howe - 2007 - In Heather Sheridan Leslie A. Howe & Keith Thompson (eds.), Sporting Reflections: Some Philosophical Perspectives. Meyer & Meyer Sport.
    Ambiguity in the athlete’s perception and description of pain that opens the door to a series of reinterpretations of athletic experience and events that argue the development of an increasingly inauthentic relation to self and others on the part of those who consume performance as third parties (spectators) and ultimately those who produce it first hand (athletes). The insertion of the spectator into the sport situation as a consumer of the athlete’s activity and the preference given to spectator interpretation shift (...)
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  43. Probability Guide to Gambling: The Mathematics of Dice, Slots, Roulette, Baccarat, Blackjack, Poker, Lottery and Sport Bets.Catalin Barboianu - 2006 - Craiova, Romania: Infarom.
    Over the past two decades, gamblers have begun taking mathematics into account more seriously than ever before. While probability theory is the only rigorous theory modeling the uncertainty, even though in idealized conditions, numerical probabilities are viewed not only as mere mathematical information, but also as a decision-making criterion, especially in gambling. This book presents the mathematics underlying the major games of chance and provides a precise account of the odds associated with all gaming events. It begins by explaining in (...)
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  44.  70
    Vicarious Pain and Genuine Pleasure: Some Reflections on Spectator Transformation of Meaning in Sport.Leslie A. Howe - 2007 - In Heather Sheridan, Leslie A. Howe & Keith Thompson (eds.), Sporting Reflections: Some Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford, UK: Meyer and Meyer Sport, Ltd.. pp. 32-44.
    Ambiguity in the athlete’s perception and description of pain that opens the door to a series of reinterpretations of athletic experience and events that argue the development of an increasingly inauthentic relation to self and others on the part of those who consume performance as third parties (spectators) and ultimately those who produce it first hand (athletes). The insertion of the spectator into the sport situation as a consumer of the athlete’s activity and the preference given to spectator interpretation shift (...)
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  45. The Moral Basis for Public Policy Encouraging Sport Hunting.Margaret Van de Pitte - 2003 - Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (2):256–266.
    This essay seeks to see if one side or the other in the hunting debate gets more purchase if we first ask what gives the state the moral right to promote sport hunting when the practice is in deep decline. We look at the dominant economic and political reasons for state support, none of which settle the moral matter. We then look at various state appeals to moral justification (ethical hunting, the right to hunt, the value of heritage, etc.) and (...)
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  46.  37
    Effect of Sports Participation By The Parent on Physical Fitness of Their Child.Dr Jayendra Sinh P. Thakor - 2018 - International Journal of Academic Health and Medical Research (IJAHMR) 2 (3):1-2.
    Abstract: The objective of the present study was to analyze the Influence of selected socio-economic condition factor, “sports participation by the parent” on Physical Fitness of college Female students. With the assistance and help of the experts in the field of Physical Fitness, Physical Education, Sports and previous researches on these areas, a comprehensive and suitable Physical Fitness and Socio-economic factor package was evolved. 500 Female college students were randomly selected from twenty one academic colleges of Saurashtra University. (...)
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  47.  19
    The Myth of Objectivity in Sports Reporting.Md Mahmudul Hoque - 2014
    Despite so many long held debates, objectivity has become a widely accepted method of practicing journalism in all parts of the world. In journalism, it refers to the reporting or describing of an incident as it is, and it is meant to be neutral as possible, without holding any kind of prejudices. Importantly, it is an achieved quality by a journalist, or a news media outlet. Ironically, many analysts observed that this very objectivity is missing in sports reporting lately. (...)
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  48. Anticipation – The Underlying Science of Sport. Report on Research Progress.Mihai Nadin - 2015 - International Journal of General Systems 44 (4):422-441.
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  49. What Might a Theory of Causation Do for Sport?Evan Thomas Knott - 2019 - Philosophies 4 (2):34-0.
    The purpose of this research is to articulate how a theory of causation might be serviceable to a theory of sport. This article makes conceptual links between Bernard Suits’ theory of game-playing, causation, and theories of causation. It justifies theories of causation while drawing on connections between sport and counterfactuals. It articulates the value of theories of causation while emphasizing possible limitations. A singularist theory of causation is found to be more broadly serviceable with particular regard to its analysis of (...)
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  50. Misleading Aesthetic Norms of Beauty: Perceptual Sexism in Elite Women's Sports.Peg Brand Weiser - 2016 - In Sherri Irvin (ed.), Body Aesthetics. New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 192-221.
    This essay is about the history of challenges that women in elite sports have faced with respect to their gender identity within a society that perpetuates misleading aesthetic norms of beauty; it is a history fraught with controversy and injustice. . . . We recommend both the acknowledgment within the realm of elite sport of perceptual sexism based on misleading aesthetic norms of beauty, and a way of correcting such erroneous categorization that allows athletes the autonomy and agency to (...)
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