Results for 'heaven'

168 found
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  1. Heavenly Freedom: A Response to Cowan.Timothy Pawl & Kevin Timpe - 2013 - Faith and Philosophy 30 (2):188-197.
    In a recent issue of Faith and Philosophy, Steven Cowan calls into question our success in responding to what we called the “Problem of Heavenly Free- dom” in our earlier “Incompatibilism, Sin, and Free Will in Heaven.” In this reply, we defend our view against Cowan’s criticisms.
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  2. Heavenly Freedom and Two Models of Character Perfection.Robert J. Hartman - 2021 - Faith and Philosophy 38 (1):45-64.
    Human persons can act with libertarian freedom in heaven according to one prominent view, because they have freely acquired perfect virtue in their pre-heavenly lives such that acting rightly in heaven is volitionally necessary. But since the character of human persons is not perfect at death, how is their character perfected? On the unilateral model, God alone completes the perfection of their character, and, on the cooperative model, God continues to work with them in purgatory to perfect their (...)
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  3.  76
    Heavenly citizenship.Andrej Poleev - 2020 - Enzymes 18.
    But our citizenship is in heaven. And we eagerly await a Savior from there, the Lord Jesus Christ, who, by the power that enables Him to subject all things to Himself, will transform our lowly bodies to be like His glorious body. – Philippians 3:20–21.
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  4. Escaping Heaven.Benjamin Matheson - 2014 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (3):197-206.
    In response to the problem of Hell, Buckareff and Plug (Relig Stud 41:39–54, 2005; Relig Stud 45:63–72, 2009) have recently proposed and defended an ‘escapist’ conception of Hell. In short, they propose that the problem of Hell does not arise because God places an open-door policy on Hell. In this paper, I expose a fundamental problem with this conception of Hell—namely, that if there’s an open door policy on Hell, then there should be one on Heaven too. I argue (...)
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  5.  70
    Heavenly "Freedom" in Fourteenth-Century Voluntarism.Eric W. Hagedorn - manuscript
    [Work in progress.] According to standard late medieval Christian thought, humans in heaven are unable to sin, having been “confirmed” in their goodness; and, nevertheless, are more free than humans are in the present life. The rise of voluntarist conceptions of the will in the late thirteenth century made it increasingly difficult to hold onto both claims. Peter Olivi suggested that the impeccability of the blessed was dependent upon a special activity of God upon their wills and argued that (...)
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  6. Heaven and Homicide.Simon Cushing - 2018 - In Heaven and Philosophy. Lanham: Lexington. pp. 255-269.
    I address the questions of whether or not the very existence of heaven provides a motivation for killing. If universalism is true, then anyone killed will end up there, as will the killer. And given that heaven is infinitely better than earth, killing would be, on this view, the greatest gift possible to the “victim.” But if universalism is not true, there is perhaps an even greater incentive to kill one’s loved ones if one knows them to be (...)
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  7. Heavenly freedom, derivative freedom, and the value of free choices.Simon Kittle - 2020 - Religious Studies 56 (4):455-472.
    Sennett (1999) and Pawl & Timpe (2009; 2013) attempt to show how we can praise heavenly agents for things they inevitably do in heaven by appealing to the notion of derivative freedom. Matheson (2017) has criticized this use of derivative freedom. In this essay I show why Matheson's argument is inconclusive but also how the basic point may be strengthened to undermine the use Sennett and Pawl & Timpe make of derivative freedom. I then show why Matheson is mistaken (...)
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  8. Heaven and Philosophy.Simon Cushing (ed.) - 2017 - Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.
    This volume is a collection of essays analyzing different issues concerning the nature, possibility, and desirability of heaven as understood by the Abrahamic faiths of Judaism, Christianity. and Islam. Topics include whether or not it is possible that a mortal could, upon bodily death, become an inhabitant of heaven without loss of identity, where exactly heaven might be located, whether or not everyone should be saved, or if there might be alternative destinations (including some less fiery versions (...)
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  9. Confucian Heaven: Moral Economy and Contingency.Back Youngsun - 2016 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (1):51--77.
    This paper examines the Confucian concept of tian, conventionally translated into English as “Heaven.‘ The secondary literature on tian has primarily focused on the question of what tian is: e.g., whether tian is an anthropomorphic deity or a naturalistic force, or whether tian is transcendent or immanent. Instead, this paper locates tian with respect to the ethical life of human beings, and argues that the two conflicting concepts of “moral economy‘ and “contingency‘ are main characteristics of tian. This paper (...)
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  10.  55
    Heavenly creatures? Visions of animal afterlife in seventeenth-century England.Lloyd Strickland - 2022 - Journal of Religious History, Literature, and Culture 1 (8):1-24.
    This article offers an extensive study of the idea of an animal afterlife in seventeenth-century England. While some have argued that the idea of an animal afterlife became prevalent at the time due to increased awareness of animals’ mental abilities, others have suggested it was due to greater sensitivity to animal suffering and the perceived need to square this suffering with divine justice. I show that both views are incorrect, and that seventeenth-century thinking about an animal afterlife was first and (...)
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  11. Heaven can wait: future tense and religiosity.Astghik Mavisakalyan, Yashar Taverdi & Clas Weber - 2021 - Journal of Population Economics (online):1-28.
    This paper identifies a new source of differences in religiosity: the type of future tense marking in language. We argue that the rewards and punishments that incentivize religious behaviour are more effective for speakers of languages without inflectional future tense. Consistent with this prediction, we show that speakers of languages without inflectional future tense are more likely to be religious and to take up the short-term costs associated with religiosity. What is likely to drive this behaviour, according to our results, (...)
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  12. Tracing and heavenly freedom.Benjamin Matheson - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 84 (1):57-69.
    Accounts of heavenly freedom typically attempt to reconcile the claim that the redeemed have free will with the claim that the redeemed cannot sin. In this paper, I first argue that Pawl and Timpe :396–417, 2009) tracing account of heavenly freedom—according to which the redeemed in heaven have only ‘derivative’ free will—is untenable. I then sketch an alternative account of heavenly freedom, one which eschews derivative free will. On this account, the redeemed are able to sin in heaven.
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  13. Heaven Can't Wait: A Critique of Current Planetary Defence Policy.Joel Marks - 2015 - In Jai Galliott (ed.), Commercial Space Exploration: Ethics, Policy and Governance. pp. 71-90.
    It is now generally recognized that Earth is at risk of a devastating collision with an asteroid or a comet. Impressive strides in our understanding of this threat have been made in recent decades, and various efforts to deal with it have been undertaken. However, the pace of government action hasn’t kept up with the advance of our knowledge. Despite the daunting dimensions of planetary defense, one intrepid NGO has stepped up to the plate: The B612 Foundation has embarked on (...)
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  14. “从‘天人合一’回归‘天-地-人’三才思想:兼论儒家环境哲学的基本框架” (From ‘Heaven-humanity Unity’ Back to ‘Heaven-Earth-Humanity’—on the Fundamentals of a Confucian Environmental Philosophy).Chenyang Li - 2014 - 周易研究 5:5-10.
    长期以来,中国学术界流行把儒家的基本思想乃至整个中国文化归结为“天人合一”,并常常把“天人合一” 的源头归结于《易经》。其实考诸中国思想史,把儒家的基本思想总结为“天人合一”,特别是把“天人合一” 的来源归结于《易经》的说法并不准确,是一种误导。《易经》的“天、地、人”三才思想较之于“天人合一”更为符合儒家思想的本旨。在儒家三才和谐的理念中,天、地、人三者各自都有自身的功能与价值。身为三才和谐结 构中的积极参与者,人类拥有促进与维持宇宙和谐的重要责任。就环境哲学而言,儒家的“三才”说既不是“环境保护主义”,也不是“自然保护主义”,而且相对于大地伦理学与深层生态学等西方的整体性环境哲学而言,儒家 整体性的环境哲学赋予人类在宇宙间以一个更崇高的地位和责任。 .
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  15.  90
    Heavenly Computation: Digital Metaphysics and the New Theology.Diane Proudfoot - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (1):147-153.
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  16. Some Problems of Heavenly Freedom.Simon Kittle - 2018 - TheoLogica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology 2 (2):97-115.
    In this essay I identify four different problems of heavenly freedom; i.e., problems that arise for those who hold that the redeemed in heaven have free will. They are: the problem arising from God's own freedom, the problem of needing to praise the redeemed for not sinning in heaven, the problem of needing to affirm that the redeemed freely refrain from sinning, and the problem arising from a commitment to the free will defence. I explore how some of (...)
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  17. Heaven Upon Earth: The Form of Moral and Religious Children's Literature to 1850.Patricia Demers - 1993 - Knoxville, Tenn. : University of Tennessee Press.
    Redresses the critical neglect of uplifting literature for children from the 16th to the 19th century, by looking at how catechisms, poetry, allegories, parables, short stories, novels, and plays handle the motif of imagining heaven on earth. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR.
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  18. Evil, Freedom and Heaven.Simon Cushing - 2018 - In Heaven and Philosophy. Lanham: Lexington. pp. 201-230.
    By far the most respected response by theists to the problem of evil is some version of the free will defense, which rests on the twin ideas that God could not create humans with free will without them committing evil acts, and that freedom is of such value that it is better that we have it than that we be perfect yet unfree. If we assume that the redeemed in heaven are impeccable, then the free will defense faces what (...)
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  19. Harmonising with Heaven and Earth: Reciprocal Harmony and Xunzi's Environmental Ethics.Yi Jonathan Chua - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (5):555-574.
    Xunzi's philosophy provides a rich resource for understanding how ethical relationships between humans and nature can be articulated in terms of harmony. In this paper, I build on his ideas to develop the concept of reciprocal harmony, which requires us to reciprocate those who make our lives liveable. In the context of the environment, I argue that reciprocal harmony generates moral obligations towards nature, in return for the existential debt that humanity owes towards heaven and earth. This can be (...)
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  20.  90
    Review of "Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory" by Jerry L. Walls. [REVIEW]Lloyd Strickland - 2016 - Reading Religion 1.
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  21. The realm of ends as a community of spirits: Kant and swedenborg on the kingdom of heaven and the cleansing of the doors of perception.Lucas Thorpe - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (1):52-75.
    In this paper I examine the genesis of Kant’s conception of a realm of ends, arguing that Kant first started to think of morality in terms of striving to be a member of a realm of ends, understood as an ideal community, in the early 1760s, and that he was influenced in this by his encounter with the Swedish mystic Emanuel Swedenborg. In 1766 Kant published Dreams of a Spirit Seer, a commentary on Swedenborg’s magnum opus, Heavenly Secrets. Most commentators (...)
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  22. Moral Imaginative Resistance to Heaven: Why the Problem of Evil is So Intractable.Chris Kramer - 2018 - de Ethica: Journal of Philosophical, Theological and Applied Ethics 1 (5):51-67.
    The majority of philosophers of religion, at least since Plantinga’s reply to Mackie’s logical problem of evil, agree that it is logically possible for an omnibenevolent, omniscient, and omnipotent God to exist who permits some of the evils we see in the actual world. This is conceivable essentially because of the possible world known as heaven. That is, heaven is an imaginable world in a similar way that logically possible scenarios in any fiction are imaginable. However, like some (...)
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  23. More Things in Heaven and Earth.Barry Smith - 1995 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 50 (1):187-201.
    Philosophers in the field of analytic metaphysics have begun gradually to come to terms with the fact that there are entities in a range of categories not dreamt of in the set-theory and predicate-logic-based ontologies of their forefathers. Examples of such “entia minora” would include: boundaries, places, events, states holes, shadows, individual colour- and tone-instances (tropes), together with combinations of these and associated simple and complex universal species or essences, states of affairs, judgment-contents, and myriad abstract structures of the sorts (...)
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  24. Catholicity Under Heaven: Reformed Ecclesiology and Chinese Visions of Cosmopolitanism.Henry S. Kuo - 2021 - Ecclesiology 17 (1):51-71.
    Reformed catholicity suffers from a fragility that causes it to easily fragment over comparatively small differences. This study wagers that an important resource that can be useful for addressing this problem is the Chinese philosophy of tianxia. The article introduces the idea of a ‘Reformed catholicity under Heaven’ by placing a more liberal interpretation of tianxia in conversation with the problems in Reformed approaches to the church’s catholicity. In doing so, the article demonstrates tianxia’s ecclesiological usefulness while articulating two (...)
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  25. Stairway to Heaven: the abstract method and levels of abstraction in mathematics.Jean Pierre Marquis & Jean-Pierre Marquis - 2016 - The Mathematical Intelligencer 38 (3):41-51.
    In this paper, following the claims made by various mathematicians, I try to construct a theory of levels of abstraction. I first try to clarify the basic components of the abstract method as it developed in the first quarter of the 20th century. I then submit an explication of the notion of levels of abstraction. In the final section, I briefly explore some of main philosophical consequences of the theory.
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  26. The Morally Difficult Notion of Heaven.Amir Saemi - 2018 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 92 (3):429-444.
    I will argue that Avicenna’s and Aquinas’s faith-based virtue ethics are crucially different from Aristotle’s virtue ethics, in that their ethics hinges on the theological notion of heaven, which is constitutively independent of the ethical life of the agent. As a result, their faith-based virtue ethics is objectionable. Moreover, I will also argue that the notion of heaven that Avicenna and Aquinas deploy in their moral philosophy is problematic; for it can rationally permit believers to commit morally horrendous (...)
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  27. Is the existence of heaven compatible with the existence of hell?James Cain - 2002 - Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (2):153-158.
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  28. ‘Following the Way of Heaven’: Exemplarism, Emulation, and Daoism.Ian James Kidd - 2020 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 6 (1):1-15.
    Many ancient traditions recognise certain people as exemplars of virtue. I argue that some of these traditions incorporate a 'cosmic' mode of emulation, where certain of the qualities or aspects of the grounds or source of the world manifest, in human form, as virtues. If so, the ultimate objection of emulation is not a human being. I illustrate this with the forms of Daoist exemplarity found in the Book of Zhuangzi, and end by considering the charge that the aspiration to (...)
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  29. Will there be races in heaven?Nathan Placencia - 2021 - In T. Ryan Byerly (ed.), Death, Immortality, and Eternal Life. Routledge. pp. 192-206.
    Drawing on work in the Philosophy of Race, this chapter argues that the existence of races in heaven is either incompatible or only questionably compatible with the mainstream Christian view of the afterlife. However, it also argues that there is a phenomenon adjacent and related to race that can exist in the afterlife, namely racial identity. If one thinks of racial identity as a kind of practical identity, it turns out that racial identity is primarily psychological. Thus, its existence (...)
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  30.  43
    The Hierarchy of Heaven and Earth.Douglas Edison Harding - 2021 - Mind and Matter 19 (1):107-129.
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  31. The Hierarchy of Heaven and Earth.Douglas Edison Harding - 1952 - New York: Harper.
    This book begins with the question 'Who am I?' and immediately sets off in an astonishingly original direction. Why didn't anyone before Harding think of responding to this question like this? It's so obvious, once you see it. Harding presents a new vision of our place in the universe that uses the scientific method of looking to see what is true. It turns out that the truth about ourselves is not only true but also very good, and breathtakingly beautiful. We (...)
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  32. Review of Heaven on Earth: The Varieties of the Millennial Experience. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2017 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 122 (5):480-2.
    Richard Landes is professionally a historian but in this book under review, he is a philosopher of violence; especially genocides and the Holocaust. The reviewer has synoptically read him, Susan Neiman on the one hand and Haruki Murakami and Stephen King on the other hand. The review flows between the history of ideas, philosophy and literary studies since all three are connected to each other.
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  33. Visa to Heaven: Orpheus, Pythagoras, and Immortality.Alex V. Halapsis - 2016 - ScienceRise 25 (8):60-65.
    The article deals with the doctrines of Orpheus and Pythagoras about the immortality of the soul in the context of the birth of philosophy in ancient Greece. Orpheus demonstrated the closeness of heavenly (divine) and earthly (human) worlds, and Pythagoras mathematically proved their fundamental identity. Greek philosophy was “an investment in the afterlife future”, being the product of the mystical (Orpheus) and rationalist (Pythagoras) theology.
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  34. Jay Rubenstein, Armies of Heaven: The First Crusade and the Quest for Apocalypse. New York: Basic Books, 2011. Pp. xiv, 402; 8 color plates, 6 black-and-white figures, and maps. $29.99. ISBN: 9780465019298. [REVIEW]Paul E. Chevedden - 2013 - Speculum 88 (3):842-844.
    This new study of the “First” Crusade argues that “apocalyptic fervor” (p. 305) was the driving force of the expedition, as well as the Crusade movement. Previous studies, the author contends, have failed “to capture how precisely apocalyptic the First Crusade was” (p. xii). The remedy Rubenstein offers is a relentless focus on apocalypticism that ignores any weaknesses inherent in this approach and overlooks alternative explanations.
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  35. Whatever Happened to Hell and Going to Heaven: Why Churches Promoting “Going to Heaven” Are Soon to Disappear (9/11/2121).Aaron Milavec - manuscript
    In my first year at the Graduate Theological Union (Berkeley); I was required to read Oscar Cullmann's <b> Immortality of the Soul or the Resurrection of the Dead? </b> (1956). I was shocked and dumbfounded by what I discovered. Giving my religious instruction under the guidance of the Ursuline nuns at Holy Cross Grade School, it never entered my mind that Jesus did not believe that every person had an immortal soul that survived the death of the body. After a (...)
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  36. An Embodied Existence in Heaven and the Non-Cartesian Substance Dualism (Revisited).Pérez Alejandro - 2021 - TheoLogica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology 2 (5).
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  37. Living without a Soul: Why God and the Heavenly Movers Fall Outside of Aristotle’s Psychology.Caleb Cohoe - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (3):281-323.
    I argue that the science of the soul only covers sublunary living things. Aristotle cannot properly ascribe ψυχή to unmoved movers since they do not have any capacities that are distinct from their activities or any matter to be structured. Heavenly bodies do not have souls in the way that mortal living things do, because their matter is not subject to alteration or generation. These beings do not fit into the hierarchy of soul powers that Aristotle relies on to provide (...)
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  38. Simplicius: On Aristotle, On the Heavens 3.1-7. Ian Mueller trans. [REVIEW]Sean Coughlin - 2011 - Aestimatio 8:34-40.
    Review of Simplicius: On Aristotle, On the Heavens 3.1-7, trans. Ian Mueller, London: Duckworth, 2009.
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  39. The dog that is a heavenly constellation and the dog that is a barking animal by Alexandre Koyré.Oberto Marrama - 2014 - The Leibniz Review 24:95-108.
    The article includes the French to English translation of a seminal article by Alexandre Koyré (“Le chien, constellation céleste, et le chien animal aboyant”, in Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale, 55e Année, N° 1, Jan-Mar 1950, pp. 50-59), accompanied by an explanatory introduction. Koyré's French text provides an illuminating commentary of E1p17s, where Spinoza exposes at length his account of the relationship existing between God's intellect and the human intellect. The lack of an English translation of this article has (...)
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  40. Spinoza and the Kabbalah: From the Gate of Heaven to the ‘Field of Holy Apples’.Yitzhak Melamed - forthcoming - In Cristina Ciucu (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy & the Kabbalah.
    In the first part of this paper we will consider the likely extent of Spinoza’s exposure to Kabbalistic literature as he was growing up in Amsterdam. In the second part we will closely study several texts in which Spinoza seems to engage with Kabbalistic doctrines. In the third and final part we will study the role of the two crucial doctrines of emanation and pantheism (or panentheism), in Spinoza’s system and in the Kabbalistic literature.
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  41.  27
    The True Self and Life After Death in Heaven.Eleonore Stump - 2021 - In T. Ryan Byerly (ed.), Death, Immortality, and Eternal Life. New York, NY, USA: pp. 65-81.
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  42. The afterlife of embryonic persons: what a strange place heaven must be.Timothy F. Murphy - 2012 - Reproductive Biomedicine Online 25:684-688.
    Some commentators argue that conception constitutes the onset of human personhood in a metaphysical sense. This threshold is usually invoked as the basis both for protecting zygotes and embryos from exposure to risks of death in clinical research and fertility medicine and for objecting to abortion, but it also has consequences for certain religious perspectives, including Catholicism whose doctrines directly engage questions of personhood and its meanings. Since more human zygotes and embryos are lost than survive to birth, conferral of (...)
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  43. Realism and Theism : A Match Made in Heaven?Simon Hewitt - forthcoming - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    There is no interesting entailment either way between theism and various forms of realism. Taking its cue from Dummett's characterisation of realism and his discussion of it with respect to theistic belief, this paper argues both that theism does not follow from realism, and that God cannot be appealed to in order to secure bivalence for an otherwise indeterminate subject matter. In both cases, significant appeal is made to the position that God is not a language user, which in turn (...)
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  44. The Double Life of Jeff Koon's Made in Heaven Glass Artworks.Max Ryynanen - 2004 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 16 (29-30).
    This article owes a lot to Arthur C. Danto's heuristic writings about the Artworld, which have shown us, that the ontological status of works of art is, at least when we discuss some current, maybe even dominating trends in contemporary art, dependent on our more or less philosophical interpretations of them. The effects of the Dantoan atmosphere of theory and art historical consciousness are, still, decisive for just some contemporary art. Danto's interest in the philosophical side of contemporary art makes (...)
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  45.  62
    Review of Denise Giardina, Storming Heaven[REVIEW]Edmund Byrne - 1988 - Labor Studies Journal 13 (4):88-89.
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  46. On Galileo's visions: Piercing the spheres of the heavens by eye and mind.Birgitta Dresp-Langley - 2014 - Perception 43:1280-1282.
    This bookreview discusses Piccolino and Wades' book on Galileo's impact on contemporary perception science.
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  47. Daoism, Humanity, and the Way of Heaven.Ian James Kidd - 2020 - Religious Studies 56:111-126.
    I argue that Zhuangist Daoism manifests what I label the spiritual aspiration to emulation, and then use this to challenge some of John Cottingham's attempts to confine authentic spiritual experience to theistic traditions.
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  48.  70
    "On Earth As It Is In Heaven": Is Art Necessary for the Christian?Don Michael Hudson - 1995 - Mars Hill Review (2):31-40.
    Narcissus has no need of art because his own reflection preoccupies him.
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  49. Theism and Realism: A Match Made in Heaven?Simon Thomas Hewitt - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 10 (4):27-53.
    There is no interesting entailment either way between theism and various forms of realism. Taking its cue from Dummett’s characterisation of realism and his discussion of it with respect to theistic belief, this paper argues both that theism does not follow from realism, and that God cannot be appealed to in order to secure bivalence for an otherwise indeterminate subject matter. In both cases, significant appeal is made to the position that God is not a language user, which in turn (...)
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  50. Divine Energies: The Consuming Fire and the Beatific Vision.A. G. Holdier - 2018 - TheoLogica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology 2 (2).
    I argue that a comprehensive ontological assessment of the beatific vision suggests that an individual’s experience of God’s face is not merely dependent on a revelation of the divine energies, but that it requires a particular mode of reception on the part of the blessed individual grounded in the reality of their faith; lacking faith, what would otherwise be experienced as the blessed vision of God is instead received as a torturous punishment. Therefore, I contend that the beatific vision is (...)
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