Results for 'latin trinitarianism'

164 found
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  1. The Trinity and Extended Simples.Martin Pickup - 2016 - Faith and Philosophy 33 (4):414-440.
    In this paper, I will offer an analogy between the Trinity and extended simples that supports a Latin approach to the Trinity. The theoretical tools developed to discuss and debate extended simples in the literature of contemporary analytic metaphysics, I argue, can help us make useful conceptual distinctions in attempts to understand what it could be for God to be Triune. Furthermore, the analogy between extended simples and the Trinity might surprise some who find one of these at least (...)
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  2. Against Trinitarian Enthusiasm: The Approach of Relative Identity Logic to the Trinity.Daniele Bertini - 2015 - Reportata. Passato E Presente Della Teologia 13.
    The theorizing about the doctrine of the Trinity by contemporary analytic philosophers of religion has recently been imbued with an air of enthusiastic excitement and self-confidence. My intuition is that there’s room for saying something more in support to the embarrassment and puzzlement traditionally related to the predication of God’s onefoldness and threefoldness. My purpose is to deliver a general argument for (weak) trinitarian skepticism. My view is that the argument provides substantive reasons in support to the common sense intuition (...)
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  3. Il dibattito sulla Trinità nella filosofia analitica della religione.Daniele Bertini - 2015 - In Ivan Pozzoni (ed.), Frammenti di filosofia contemporanea. Limina Mentis. pp. 111-135.
    An overview of the recent debate on the Trinity in the analytic philosophy of religion. I move from putting forward the Logical Problem of the Trinity (LPT) according to R.Cartwright and M.Rea. I then define two useful notions in order to evaluate the interpretive force of the mainstream approaches to answer LPT; i.e. , be X a concept, I define maximally robust reading of X and sufficiently robust reading of X. In the subsequent section, I offer an expository analysis of (...)
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  4.  99
    Who Owns It? Three Arguments for Land Claims in Latin America.Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland - 2017 - Revista de Ciencia Politica 37 (3):713-736.
    Indigenous and non-indigenous communities in Latin America make land claims and support them with a variety of arguments. Some, such as Zapatistas and the Mapuche, have appealed to the “ancestral” or “historical” connections between specific communities and the land. Other groups, such as MST in Brazil, have appealed to the extremely unequal distribution of the land and the effects of this on the poor; the land in this case is seen mainly as a means for securing a decent standard (...)
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  5. Review of S. Nuccetelli Et Al. Blackwell Companion to Latin American Philosophy. [REVIEW]C. Ulises Moulines - 2010 - Metascience (19):457-460.
    This volume contains the most extensive exposition of Latin American philosophy to date. I know of no other comparable anthology on the subject in any language. The width of its scope is quite impressive. At least for this reason, and whatever its shortcomings might be (to some of them I’ll come to speak below), it is a welcome collective work.
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  6.  43
    Latin American Philosophy.Alexander V. Stehn - 2014 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This encyclopedia article outlines the history of Latin American philosophy: the thinking of its indigenous peoples, the debates over conquest and colonization, the arguments for national independence in the eighteenth century, the challenges of nation-building and modernization in the nineteenth century, the concerns over various forms of development in the twentieth century, and the diverse interests in Latin American philosophy during the opening decades of the twenty-first century. Rather than attempt to provide an exhaustive and impossibly long list (...)
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  7. Laclau, Populism, and Emancipation: From Latin America to the U.S. Latino/A Context.Adam Burgos - 2014 - Inter-American Journal of Philosophy 5 (1).
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  8. "Why the Struggle Against Coloniality is Paramount to Latin American Philosophy".Grant J. Silva - 2015 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 15 (1):8-12.
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  9. The Latin “Third Man”. A Survey and Edition of Texts From the XIIIth Century.Leone Gazziero - 2012 - Cahiers de L’Institut du Moyen Age Grec Et Latin 81:11-93.
    Latin commentators came across the « Third Man » in Aristotle’s Sophistici elenchi. The way they dealt with the argument is a fair illustration of how they were both faithful to the text and innovative in their understanding of its most challenging issues. Besides providing a detailed survey of all manuscript sources, the introductory essay shows that Latin interpretation originates from a mistake in Boethius’ translation which radically transformed the argument. The edition makes available for the first time (...)
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  10.  63
    Latin American Philosophy at a Crossroads. [REVIEW]Elena Ruíz - 2011 - Human Studies 34 (3):309-331.
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  11. Latin American Philosophy.Susana Nuccetelli - 2010 - In Susana Nuccetelli, Ofelia Schutte & Otávio Bueno (eds.), A Companion to Latin American Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  12. Indexicals and the Trinity: Two Non-Social Models.Scott M. Williams - 2013 - Journal of Analytic Theology 1 (1):74-94.
    In recent analytic literature on the Trinity we have seen a variety of "social" models of the Trinity. By contrast there are few "non-­‐social" models. One prominent "non-­‐social" view is Brian Leftow's "Latin Trinity." I argue that the name of Leftow's model is not sufficiently descriptive in light of diverse models within Latin speaking theology. Next, I develop a new "non-­‐social" model that is inspired by Richard of St. Victor's description of a person in conjunction with my appropriating (...)
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  13. The Problem with Social Trinitarianism: A Reply to Wierenga.Jeffrey E. Brower - 2004 - Faith and Philosophy 21 (3):295-303.
    In a recent article, Edward Wierenga defends a version of Social Trinitarianism according to which the Persons of the Trinity form a unique society of really distinct divine beings, each of whom has its own exemplification of divinity. In this paper, I call attention to several philosophical and theological difficulties with Wierenga’s account, as well as to a problem that such difficulties pose for Social Trinitarianism generally. I then briefly suggest what I take to be a more promising (...)
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  14. Latin American Feminist Philosophy.Susana Nuccetelli - 2008 - In Kinsbruner Jay (ed.), Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture. Charles Scribner’s Sons.
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  15.  44
    Latin in a Time of Change: The Choice of Language as Signifier of a New Science?Sietske Fransen - 2017 - Isis 108 (3):629-635.
    This essay discusses three authors from the early seventeenth century (Galileo, Descartes, and Van Helmont) and the reasons that guided their decisions to write occasionally in their respective vernacular languages even though Latin remained the accepted language for learned communication. From their writings we can see that their choices were social, political, and always of high importance. The choice of language of these multilingual authors conveyed a message that was sometimes implicit, sometimes explicit. Their usage of both Latin (...)
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  16.  17
    Aristotelian Reasoning in the 13th Century Latin Medieval Age and a Philosophical Assessment on Latin Avicenousness.Süleyman Dönmez - 2019 - Mevzu - Journal of Social Sciences 1:23-34.
    In this article, Aristotelian Intelligence in the 13th Century Latin Medieval Era was evaluated on the basis of Ibn Rushd. In this context, the philosophical movement which is known as Latin Averroism is discussed. The concept of reason, which has begun to be discussed by the philosopher Ibn Rushd in the Middle Middle Age through the recognition of the annotations he wrote on Aristotle's works in the Middle Ages, seems to have gained a theological and political aspect with (...)
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  17.  50
    "Opinio Copiae Inter Maximas Causas Inopiae Est": On Mistranslating a Latin Quotation in Mill's The Subjection of Women.David Riesbeck - 2017 - Reason Papers 39 (1):137-142.
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  18.  64
    Male Youths as Objects of Desire in Latin Literature: Some Antinomies in the Priapic Model of Roman Sexuality.Jula Wildberger - 2010 - In Barbara Feichtinger & Gottfried Kreuz (eds.), Eros und Aphrodite: Von der Macht der Erotik und der Erotik der Macht. Trier: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier. pp. 227-253.
    Drawing on a range of sources such as Roman oratory, love elegy, Carmina Priapea and Petronius, the paper claims that the Priapic model of Roman Sexuality entails a particularly vulnerable form of male sexuality which can best be observed in descriptions of young men in the transitional period to manhood, such as, e.g., Achilles in Statius' Achilleis.
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  19. La antiquísima sabiduría de Los italianos partiendo de Los orígenes de la lengua latina. Trad, Del latin Por francisco J. Navarro Gómez.Giambattista Vico - 2000 - Cuadernos Sobre Vico 1999 (443):11-12.
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  20.  10
    Theorizing Multiple Oppressions Through Colonial History: Cultural Alterity and Latin American Feminisms.Elena Ruíz - 2011 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 2 (11):5-9.
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  21. Latin American Ethics.Susana Nuccetelli - forthcoming - In Hugh LaFollete (ed.), Internationa Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  22. The Logical Space of Social Trinitarianism.Matthew Davidson - 2016 - Faith and Philosophy 33 (3):333-357.
    I try to lay bare some of the conceptual space in which one may be a Social Trinitarian. I organize the paper around answers to five questions. These are: How do the three Persons of the Trinity relate to the Godhead? How many divine beings or gods are there? How many distinct centers of consciousness are there in the Godhead? How many omnicompetent beings are there? How are the Persons of the Trinity individuated? I try to make clear costs and (...)
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  23.  6
    The History of an Insult, the Latin Word Poppysma in 15th-Century Italian Literature.D. Coppini - 1984 - Rinascimento 24:231-249.
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  24. Identical Legal Entities and the Trinity: Relative-Social Trinitarianism.James Goetz - 2016 - Journal of Analytic Theology 4 (1):128-146.
    Goetz outlined legal models of identical entities that include natural persons who are identical to a coregency and natural persons who are identical to a general partnership. Those entities cohere with the formula logic of relative identity. This essay outlines the coexistence of relative identity and numerical identity in the models of identical legal entities, which is impure relative identity. These models support the synthesis of Relative Trinitarianism and Social Trinitarianism, which I call Relative-Social Trinitarianism.
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  25. Found in Translation: Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics 3.5, 1113b7-8 and its Reception.Susanne Bobzien - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 45:103-148.
    ABSTRACT: This paper is distinctly odd. It demonstrates what happens when an analytical philosopher and historian of philosophy tries their hand at the topic of reception. For a novice to this genre, it seemed advisable to start small. Rather than researching the reception of an author, book, chapter, section or paragraph, the focus of the paper is on one sentence: Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics 3.5, 1113b7-8. This sentence has markedly shaped scholarly and general opinion alike with regard to Aristotle’s theory of (...)
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  26.  51
    Being-in-the-World-Hispanically: A World on the "Border" of Many Worlds.Enrique Dussel & Alexander Stehn - 2009 - Comparative Literature 61 (3):256-273.
    This translation of Enrique Dussel's “‘Ser-Hispano’: Un Mundo en el ‘Border’ de Muchos Mundos” offers an interpretation of hispanos (Latin Americans and U.S. latinos) as historically, culturally, and geographically located “in-between” many worlds that combine to constitute an identity on the intercultural “border.” To illustrate how hispanos have navigated and continue to navigate their complex history in order to create a polyphonic identity, the essay sketches five historical-cultural “worlds” that come together to form the hispanic “world.”.
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  27.  34
    Mental Furniture From the Philosophers.James Franklin - 1983 - Et Cetera 40:177-191.
    The abstract Latinate vocabulary of modern English, in which philosophy and science are done, is inherited from medieval scholastic Latin. Words like "nature", "art", "abstract", "probable", "contingent", are not native to English but entered it from scholastic translations around the 15th century. The vocabulary retains much though not all of its medieval meanings.
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  28. José Mariátegui's East-South Decolonial Experiment.David Haekwon Kim - 2015 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (2):157-179.
    Common notions of comparative philosophy tend to be strongly configured by the East-West axis. This essay suggests ways of seeing Latin American liberation philosophy as a form of comparative philosophy and an important Latin American thinker as being relevant for East-West political philosophy. The essay focuses on the Peruvian activist and intellectual, José Mariátegui, who is widely regarded to have been a leading Marxist, liberatory, and decolonial figure in 20th century Latin America. Like many “Third World” intellectuals (...)
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  29. Mariategui's Myth.Kim Diaz - 2013 - The American Philosophical Association, APA Newsletter on Hispanic and Latino Issues in Philosophy 13 (1):18-22.
    One of the best-known aspects of José Carlos Mariátegui’s philosophy is his concept of a revolutionary myth. What does this revolutionary myth entail, how and why did Mariátegui develop this idea? The following article situates Mariátegui’s thought in both the historical and intellectual context of the 1920’s in order to answer these questions. This is relevant because Mariátegui’s philosophy and his revolutionary myth have influenced several Latin American revolutionaries such as Ernesto Che Guevara and Sendero Luminoso (Shining Path). Mariátegui’s (...)
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  30. The God of the Groups.Chad A. Mcintosh - 2016 - Religious Studies 52 (2):167-186.
    I argue that Social Trinitarians can and should conceive of God as a group person. They can by drawing on recent theories of group agency realism that show how groups can be not just agents but persons distinct from their members—albeit, I argue, persons of a different kind. They should because the resultant, novel view of the Trinity—that God is three ‘intrinsicist’ persons in one ‘functional’ person—is theologically sound, effectively counters the most trenchant criticisms of Social Trinitarianism, and enjoys (...)
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  31. A Very British Hobbes, or A More European Hobbes?Patricia Springborg - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):368-386.
    Malcolm’s English-Latin Leviathan is a marvelous technical accomplishment. My issues are with his contextualization, seeing Leviathan primarily as an advice book for Hobbes’s teenage pupil, the future Charles II. Malcolm’s localization involves minimalizing Leviathan's remoter sources, so the European Republic of Letters, for which Hobbes so painstakingly translated his works into Latin, is almost entirely missing, along with current European traditions of Hobbes scholarship. Is this very British Hobbes truly credible, or do we need a more European Hobbes (...)
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  32.  62
    Educación en América Latina: retos y oportunidades para la filosofía de la región.Edgar Eslava - 2015 - Universitas Philosophica 32 (65):223.
    Framed within the development policies for the region, educational agendas for Latin America represent specific commitments that transcend the improvement in the results of specific tests permeating both pedagogical practices and conceptual frameworks in which these ones acquire meaning. This paper covers some of the commitments made by these agendas and develops the general framework in which participation of philosophical community is expected and required as a guarantor and promoter of the construction of spaces for reflection and action on (...)
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  33. Daniel Hermann – a Well-Travelled Prussian Humanist and His Poetic Work in Riga.Magnus Frisch - 2015 - Letonica – Humanitāru Zinātņu Žurnāls / Journal of Humantities 30:44-57.
    The Prussian Protestant Daniel Hermann is an important Neo-Latin poet. He lived from probably 1543 until 1601. Hermann studied at Königsberg, Straßburg, Basel and Wittenberg. Afterwards he served as a secretary at the Imperial Court at Vienna, later as a secretary of the city of Danzig and permanent ambassador of Danzig at the Royal Polish court during the wars against Russia. After the war he married and settled down in Riga and became the secretary of the Polish governor Cardinal (...)
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  34.  16
    Loving Immigrants in America: The Philosophical Power of Stories. [REVIEW]Alexander V. Stehn - 2018 - Radical Philosophy Review 21 (2):365-369.
    BOOK REVIEW: Through fifteen interrelated essays, Daniel Campos’ Loving Immigrants in America reflects upon his experiences as a Latin American immigrant to the United States and develops an experiential philosophy of personal interaction. Building upon previous work, Campos’ implicit conceptual framework comes from Charles S. Peirce’s dual philosophical accounts of the evolution of personality and evolutionary love. But the flesh and blood of the book are Campos’ own personal experiences as an immigrant who has labored for more than twenty (...)
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  35.  51
    “Vertendo vel etiam commentando in Latinam redigam formam” (In Aristotelis peri hermeneias commentarium. Editio secunda, II, 79.23 - 80.1). Boèce ou l’art de bien traduire (en commentant) et de bien commenter (en traduisant).Leone Gazziero - 2017 - Rursus 10:1-117.
    Celebrated as the equal to the great philosophers of old, namely Plato and Aristotle, whom – as Cassiodorus put it – he taught to speak Latin better than they spoke Greek, Boethius aspired to fully emancipate Roman culture from its Greek models through translations and exegesis so faithful they would leave nothing more to be desired from the original. The essay focuses on Boethius philhellenism, without complexes insofar as it had little to do either with the mixed feelings of (...)
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  36.  30
    Ovids Schule der ‘Elegischen’ Liebe: Erotodidaxe Und Psychagogie in der Ars Amatoria.Jula Wildberger - 1998 - Frankfurt am Main et al.: Peter Lang.
    This dissertation in classics might be of interest for gender studies as well since it is a sustained demonstration how one social and literary sterotype (the elegiac lover -- der elegisch Liebende) is systematically transformed into another (the artist of love -- der Liebeskünstler) as part of generic transformation (turning Latin love elegy into didactic poetry). The counterpart of these stereotypes is the "harsh lady" (dura domina), who is domesticated in the third book of the Ars amatoria. The copyright (...)
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  37. L'uso Del Latino Nella Sacra Liturgia. Per Un'analisi Filosofico-Linguistica Degli Argomenti Pro E Contro.Francesco Mascellino - 2014 - Rivista Teologica di Lugano:501-518.
    In this essay the supporting arguments of the Catholic Magisterium regarding the use of liturgical Latin in the Roman Rite are analysed, emphasizing the arguments based on the characters of immutability, nobility and universality of the Latin language. Moreover, some critics of present theologians relating to the concern of Latin being a hindrance to the participatio actuosa to the Holy Liturgy are here examined. Of both positions the effectiveness and ineffectiveness are highlighted. Finally, it is suggested to (...)
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  38. From Positivism to ‘Anti-Positivism’ in Mexico: Some Notable Continuities.Alexander Stehn - 2012 - In Gregory Gilson & Irving Levinson (eds.), Latin American Positivism: New Historical and Philosophic Essays. Lexington Books. pp. 49.
    A general consensus has emerged in the scholarship on Latin American thought dating from the latter half of the nineteenth century through the first quarter of the twentieth. Latin American intellectuals widely adapted the European philosophy of positivism in keeping with the demands of their own social and political contexts, effectively making positivism the second most important philosophical tradition in the history of Latin America, after scholasticism. However, as thinkers across Latin America faced the challenges of (...)
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  39.  20
    Hegel y América Latina. Entre el diagnóstico de la brecha de desarrollo y el eurocentrismo.Hector Ferreiro - 2019 - Hermenéutica Intercultural (31):187-208.
    Para Hegel, Asia señala el comienzo de la historia universal, mientras que Europa señala su consumación y final. La América precolombina, al igual que la África negra, están para Hegel fuera de la historia universal; en cuanto a la historia de América tras su descubrimiento por los europeos, Hegel sostiene que lo que ha sucedido desde entonces en el continente americano proviene, en rigor, del “principio de Europa”. Hegel contrapone a su vez la historia de América Latina a la de (...)
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  40. Peons and Progressives: Race and Boosterism in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, 1904-1941.Cory Wimberly, Javier Martinez, Margarita Cavazos & David Munoz - 2018 - The Western Historical Quarterly (094).
    The Texas borderlands have come to be increasingly important in the historical literature and in public opinion for the way that the region shapes national thought on race, borders, and ethnicity. With this increasing importance, it is pressing to examine the history of these issues in the region so that they may be accurately and insightfully deployed. This article contributes to the existing scholarship with a close discursive analysis of race in the booster materials, 1904-1941. The booster materials forge a (...)
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  41. Liebeskunst – Kann man Liebe lehren und lernen?Magnus Frisch - 2013 - IANUS 34:50-68.
    Der Artikel stellt eine Unterrichtseinheit für die Lektürephase des Lateinunterrichts dar, die vor allem für die Sekundarstufe II geeignet ist. Die vorzustellende Unterrichtsreihe geht von der Fragestellung "Kann man Liebe lehren und lernen?" aus, wobei zunächst herausgearbeitet werden soll, was wir und was die Schüler unter "Liebe" verstehen, und dann allgemein und in Bezug auf unsere eigene Lebenswelt diskutiert wird, ob sich Liebe lehren und lernen lasse, sei es durch Ratgeber, Flirtschulen, oder Tipps von anderen. Im Anschluss beginnt die Lektüre (...)
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  42.  55
    Existence as Economy and as Charity.Antonio Caso, Alexander Stehn & Jose G. Rodriguez Jr - 2017 - In Carlos Alberto Sanchez & Jr Sanchez (eds.), 20th Century Mexican Philosophy: Essential Readings. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 27-45.
    Antonio Caso, “La existencia como economía y como caridad” (1916). Translated with Jose G. Rodriguez Jr. as “Existence as Economy and as Charity,” in 20th Century Mexican Philosophy: Essential Readings, eds. Carlos Alberto Sánchez and Robert Eli Sanchez, Jr. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2017).
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  43. Introduction to the Ethics of Illegality.José Jorge Mendoza - 2009 - Oregon Review of International Law 11 (1):123-128.
    In this article I use the tropes of El Cucuy (the Mexican version of the boogyman), La Llorona (the wailer), and La Migra (the border patrol) to provide the beginnings of an ethical critique of the treatment of undocumented immigrants in the United States.
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  44. Two Peas in a Single Polytheistic Pod: Richard Swinburne and John Hick.Daniel Howard-Snyder - 2016 - Journal of Philosophical Research 41 (Supplement):17-32.
    A descriptive polytheist thinks there are at least two gods. John Hick and Richard Swinburne are descriptive polytheists. In this respect, they are like Thomas Aquinas and many other theists. What sets Swinburne and Hick apart from Aquinas, however, is that unlike him they are normative polytheists. That is, Swinburne and Hick think that it is right that we, or at least some of us, worship more than one god. However, the evidence available to me shows that only Swinburne, and (...)
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  45. U.S. Border Wall: A Poggean Analysis of Illegal Immigration.Kim Díaz - 2010 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 17 (1):1-12.
    Drawing on the work of John Rawls and Thomas Pogge, I argue that the U.S. is in part responsible for the immigration of Mexicans and Central Americans into the U.S. By seeking to further its national interests through its foreign policies, the U.S. has created economic and politically oppressive conditions that Mexican and Central American people seek to escape. The significance of this project is to highlight the role of the U.S. in illegal immigration so that we may first acknowledge (...)
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  46.  27
    Professional Philosophy, "Diversity," and Racist Exclusion: On Van Norden's 'Taking Back Philosophy: A Multicultural Manifesto'.Grant Joseph Silva - 2018 - Expositions 2 (12):39-53.
    A critical review essay, this work explains the methodological, material, and ideological reasons for why "diversity" initiatives in philosophy face an up-hill battle.
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  47.  17
    Barbaric, Unseen, and Unknown Orders: Innovative Research on Street and Farmers' Markets.Alexander V. Stehn - 2019 - The Pluralist 14 (1):47.
    Professor Morales’ Coss Dialogue Lecture demonstrates the utility of pragmatism for his work as a social scientist across three projects: 1) field research studying the acephalous and heterogenous social order of Chicago’s Maxwell Street Market; 2) nascent research how unseen religious orders animate the lives of im/migrants and their contributions to food systems; and 3) large-scale longitudinal research on farmers markets using the Metrics + Indicators for Impact (MIFI) toolkit. The first two sections of my paper applaud and build upon (...)
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  48.  36
    Metrik Im Unterricht. Gründe – Ziele – Wege.Magnus Frisch - 2018 - In Metrik im altsprachlichen Unterricht (Ars Didactica - Marburger Beiträge zu Studium und Didaktik der Alten Sprachen; Bd. 4). Speyer: Kartoffeldurck-Verlag Kai Brodersen. pp. 11-20.
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  49. The Promise of Caribbean Philosophy: How It Can Cpntribute to a "New Dialogic" in Philosophy.Jennifer Lisa Vest - 2005 - Caribbean Studies 33 (2):3-34.
    The Caribbean is a site where multiple cultures, peoples, waysof thinking and acting have come together and where new formsof philosophy are emerging. The promise of Caribbean philoso-phy lays in its ability to give shape to an intellectual tradition which is both true to and beneficial to Caribbean peoples whilesimultaneously being provocative enough to engage wisdom-seekers of various geographies and identities. I argue that onlyby pursuing a “New Dialogic” which engages the philosophicaltraditions of Africans, African Americans, and Native Ameri-cans can (...)
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  50.  30
    Beobachtungen zur Behandlung von Prosodie und Metrik im altsprachlichen Unterricht.Magnus Frisch - 2018 - In Metrik im altsprachlichen Unterricht (Ars Didactica - Marburger Beiträge zu Studium und Didaktik der Alten Sprachen; Bd. 4). Speyer: Kartoffeldruck-Verlag Kai Brodersen. pp. 21-43.
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1 — 50 / 164