Results for 'phenomenological reduction'

998 found
Order:
  1. Phenomenological Reduction in Merleau‐Ponty's The Structure of Behavior : An Alternative Approach to the Naturalization of Phenomenology.Hayden Kee - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):15-32.
    Approaches to the naturalization of phenomenology usually understand naturalization as a matter of rendering continuous the methods, epistemologies, and ontologies of phenomenological and natural scientific inquiry. Presupposed in this statement of the problematic, however, is that there is an original discontinuity, a rupture between phenomenology and the natural sciences that must be remedied. I propose that this way of thinking about the issue is rooted in a simplistic understanding of the phenomenological reduction that entails certain assumptions about (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  83
    Phenomenological reduction as a philosophical conversion (periagoge): Husserl and Scheler.Guido Cusinato - 2012 - In Person und Selbsttranszendenz.
    Phenomenological reduction as a philosophical conversion (periagoge) -/- Während Husserl in den Ideen I die Reduktion als eine neue „Methode“ des Denkens, d. h. als eine „epistemologische“ Reduktion versteht, schlägt Scheler eine Reduktion als eine „Tèchne“ der Umbildung vor, durch die der Mensch seiner exzentrischen Stellung in der Welt Gestalt zu geben sucht. Mich interessiert an diesem Zitat vor allem der Gebrauch des griechischen Terminus „Tèchne“. Was Scheler damit bezeichnet, hat offensichtlich nichts mit dem zu tun, was wir (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Phenomenological Reduction in Heidegger's Sein Und Zeit: A New Proposal.Matheson Russell - 2008 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 39 (3):229-248.
    In Phenomenological Reduction in Heidegger's Sein und Zeit: a New Proposal, Matheson Russell investigates the indebtedness of the Heidegger of Being and Time to Husserl's transcendental phenomenology by way of distinguishing in it differing types of transcendental reduction. He supplies an overview of recent attempts to identify such reductions in order then to propose a new interpretation locating two levels of reduction in Heidegger's fundamental ontology. These concern, first, an enquiry going back to the horizon of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Modus Vivendi of Persons with Schizophrenia: Valueception Impairment and Phenomenological Reduction.Guido Cusinato - 2018 - Thaumàzein – Rivista di Filosofia 6:78-92.
    So far, the value dimension underlying affectivity disorders has remained out of focus in phenomenological psychopathology. As early as at the beginning of the 20th century, however, German phenomenologist Max Scheler examined in depth the relationship between affectivity and value dimension through the concept of valueception (Wertnehmung). In this sense, a recent noteworthy contribution has been provided by John Cutting, who has drawn attention to the importance of Scheler’s analyses for psychiatry. In this work I take into consideration only (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  73
    Patient Autonomy, Clinical Decision Making, and the Phenomenological Reduction.Jonathan Lewis & Søren Holm - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-13.
    Phenomenology gives rise to certain ontological considerations that have far-reaching implications for standard conceptions of patient autonomy in medical ethics, and, as a result, the obligations of and to patients in clinical decision-making contexts. One such consideration is the phenomenological reduction in classical phenomenology, a core feature of which is the characterisation of our primary experiences as immediately and inherently meaningful. This paper builds on and extends the analyses of the phenomenological reduction in the works of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Explaining Colour Phenomenology: Reduction Versus Connection.Nicholas Unwin - manuscript
    A major part of the mind–body problem is to explain why a given set of physical processes should give rise to qualia of one sort rather than another. Colour hues are the usual example considered here, and there is a lively debate between, for example, Hardin, Levine, Jackson, Clark and Chalmers as to whether the results of colour vision science can provide convincing explanations of why colours actually look the way they do. This paper examines carefully the type of explanation (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Reductive Representationalism and Emotional Phenomenology.Uriah Kriegel - 2017 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 41 (1):41-59.
    A prominent view of phenomenal consciousness combines two claims: (i) the identity conditions of phenomenally conscious states can be fully accounted for in terms of these states’ representational content; (ii) this representational content can be fully accounted for in non-phenomenal terms. This paper presents an argument against this view. The core idea is that the identity conditions of phenomenally conscious states are not fixed entirely by what these states represent (their representational contents), but depend in part on how they represent (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  8. The Phenomenology of Awareness as the Second Reduction.Rudolph Bauer - 2012 - Transmission 3.
    This paper focuses on the phenomenology of awareness and the second reduction.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Applied phenomenology: why it is safe to ignore the epoché.Dan Zahavi - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review (2):1-15.
    The question of whether a proper phenomenological investigation and analysis requires one to perform the epoché and the reduction has not only been discussed within phenomenological philosophy. It is also very much a question that has been hotly debated within qualitative research. Amedeo Giorgi, in particular, has insisted that no scientific research can claim phenomenological status unless it is supported by some use of the epoché and reduction. Giorgi partially bases this claim on ideas found (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  10. Reduction and Reflection After the Analytic-Continental Divide.Jacob Rump - 2021 - In Hanne Jacobs (ed.), The Husserlian Mind. Routledge. pp. 117-28.
    In this chapter, I discuss some lesser-known aspects of Husserl’s concept of the phenomenological reduction in relation to his use of the notion of reflection, and indicate how these topics connect to concerns in contemporary philosophy after the analytic-continental divide. Empathy, collective intentionality, non-representationalism, non-cognitivism, and the focus on the lived body as a source of sense-making and knowing-how are all domains in which Husserl’s conception of the reduction anticipates recent philosophical trends after the analytic-continental divide. They (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  66
    Quantum Phenomenology as a “Rigorous Science”: The Triad of Epoché and the Symmetries of Information.Vasil Penchev - 2021 - Philosophy of Science eJournal (Elsevier: SSRN) 14 (48):1-18.
    Husserl (a mathematician by education) remained a few famous and notable philosophical “slogans” along with his innovative doctrine of phenomenology directed to transcend “reality” in a more general essence underlying both “body” and “mind” (after Descartes) and called sometimes “ontology” (terminologically following his notorious assistant Heidegger). Then, Husserl’s tradition can be tracked as an idea for philosophy to be reinterpreted in a way to be both generalized and mathenatizable in the final analysis. The paper offers a pattern borrowed from the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. A Phenomenology of Critical-Ethical Vision: Merleau-Ponty, Bergson, and the Question of Seeing Differently.Alia Al-Saji - 2009 - Chiasmi International 11:375-398.
    Drawing on Merleau-Ponty’s “Eye and Mind” and Bergson’s Matière et mémoire and “La perception du changement,” I ask what resources are available in vision for interrupting objectifying habits of seeing. While both Bergson and Merleau-Ponty locate the possibility of seeing differently in the figure of the painter, I develop by means of their texts, and in dialogue with Iris Marion Young’s work, a more general phenomenology of hesitation that grounds what I am calling “critical-ethical vision.” Hesitation, I argue, stems from (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  13. A Phenomenology Without Phenomena? Carl Stumpf’s Critical Remarks on Husserl’s Phenomenology.Denis Fisette - 2015 - In D. Fisette and R. Martinelli (ed.), Philosophy from an empirical Standpoint. Essays on Carl Stumpf. Amsterdam: Rodopi. pp. 321-358.
    This study is a commentary on Carl Stumpf's evaluation of Husserl's phenomenology as presented in the Logical Investigations and the first book of Ideas. I first examine Stumpf's reception of the version of phenomenology that Husserl presented in the Logical Investigations and I then look at §§ 85-86 of Ideas I, in which Husserl seeks to demarcate his "pure" phenomenology from that of Stumpf. In the third section, I analyze the criticism that Stumpf, in § 13 of his book Erkenntnislehre, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14. The Theory, Practice, and Evaluation of the Phenomenological Method as a Qualitative Research Procedure.Amedeo Giorgi - 1997 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 28 (2):235-260.
    This article points out the criteria necessary in order for a qualitative scientific method to qualify itself as phenomenological in a descriptive Husserlian sense. One would have to employ description within the attitude of the phenomenological reduction, and seek the most invariant meanings for a context. The results of this analysis are used to critique an article by Klein and Westcott , that presents a typology of the development of the phenomenological psychological method.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   71 citations  
  15. The Way to the Subject Between Phenomenology and Psychology.Nicola Zippel - 2010 - Philosophy Today 54 (Supplement):128-134.
    The method of the transcendental reduction, which takes place as a return revealing the subjectivity to itself, makes possible to grasp the link connecting the worldly reality and the egological dimension, i.e. the world’s becoming in the ways of the originally subjective constitution. The legitimate aim of the psychological experience to understand the basic structures of the life-consciousness can find in the conceptual figure of the phenomenological reduction both a valid methodological approach and a useful terms of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  44
    Symposium: The Idea of Phenomenology at 100.Robert Sokolowski, John B. Brough & John J. Drummond - 2008 - Husserl Studies 24 (3):177-191.
    A fruitful way to approach The Idea of Phenomenology is through Husserl’s claim that consciousness is not a bag, box, or any other kind of container. The bag conception, which dominated much of modern philosophy, is rooted in the idea that philosophy is restricted to investigating only what is really immanent to consciousness, such as acts and sensory contents. On this view, what Husserl called “the riddle of transcendence” can never be solved. The phenomenological reduction, as Husserl develops (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  17. The Relevance of Phenomenological Analysis Within Current Epistemology.Stathis Livadas - 2020 - Phainomenon 30:107-134.
    This article is primarily concerned with the articulation of a defensible position on the relevance of phenomenological analysis with the current epistemological edifice as this latter has evolved since the rupture with the classical scientific paradigm pointing to the Newtonian-Leibnizian tradition which took place around the beginning of 20th century. My approach is generally based on the reduction of the objects-contents of natural sciences, abstracted in the form of ideal objectivities in the corresponding logical-mathematical theories, to the content (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Towards a Phenomenology of Repression: A Husserlian Reply to the Freudian Challenge.Nicholas Smith - 2010 - Stockholm University Press.
    This is the first book-length philosophical study of Husserl’s transcendental phenomenology and Freud’s theory of the unconscious. The book investigates the possibility for Husserl’s transcendental phenomenology to clarify Freud’s concept of the unconscious with a focus on the theory of repression as its centre. Repression is the unconscious activity of pushing something away from consciousness, while making sure that it remains active as something foreign within us. How this is possible is the main problem addressed in the work. Unlike previous (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  19. Investigating Modes of Being in the World: An Introduction to Phenomenologically Grounded Qualitative Research.Allan Køster & Anthony Vincent Fernandez - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-21.
    In this article, we develop a new approach to integrating philosophical phenomenology with qualitative research. The approach uses phenomenology’s concepts, namely existentials, rather than methods such as the epoché or reductions. We here introduce the approach to both philosophers and qualitative researchers, as we believe that these studies are best conducted through interdisciplinary collaboration. In section 1, we review the debate over phenomenology’s role in qualitative research and argue that qualitative theorists have not taken full advantage of what philosophical phenomenology (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  20. Varela on the Pragmatic Dimension of Phenomenology.Andrea Pace Giannotta - 2017 - Constructivist Foundations 13 (1):78-81.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Varela’s Radical Proposal: How to Embody and Open Up Cognitive Science” by Kristian Moltke Martiny. Upshot: I examine Varela’s relationship with Husserl’s phenomenology, highlighting Varela’s acknowledgment of the pragmatic dimension of its phenomenological reduction. I argue that Varela sees, in some developments of phenomenology, a deconstruction of the subject-object duality and an embodied view of the mind. I also highlight the existential dimension of Varela’s radical proposal, which contributes to further opening up (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. Ordinary Language Philosophy as Phenomenological Research: Reading Austin with Merleau‐Ponty.Lars Leeten - 2022 - Philosophical Investigations 45 (3):227-251.
    In his late ‘A Plea for Excuses’, John L. Austin suggests labelling his philosophy ‘linguistic phenomenology’. This article examines which idea of phenomenology Austin had in mind when he coined this term and what light this sheds on his method. It is argued that the key to answering this question can be found in Merleau-Ponty’s 'Phenomenology of Perception', which Austin must have been familiar with. Merleau-Ponty presents phenomenology in a way Austin could embrace: it is a method, it aims at (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Toward a Non-Reductive Naturalism: Combining the Insights of Husserl and Dewey.Gregory A. Trotter - 2016 - William James Studies 12 (1):19-35.
    This paper examines the status of naturalism in the philosophies of Edmund Husserl and John Dewey. Despite the many points of overlap and agreement between Husserl’s and Dewey’s philosophical projects, there remains one glaring difference, namely, the place and status of naturalism in their approaches. For Husserl, naturalism is an enemy to be vanquished. For Dewey, naturalism is the only method that can put philosophy back in touch with the concerns of human beings. This paper will demonstrate the remarkable similarities (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. “Inflecting ‘Presence’ and ‘Absence’: On Sharing the Phenomenological Conversation.”.Chad Engelland - 2020 - In Language and Phenomenology. New York, NY, USA: pp. 273-295.
    This chapter introduces the difficulty of acquiring phenomenological terms by examining Carnap’s and Derrida’s criticisms of phenomenological speech; their criticisms show that any account of how phenomenological speech is acquired must clarify its distinction from ordinary speech about things while not falling prey to an esoteric separation. The chapter then reviews the way Husserl, Scheler, and Heidegger offer “indication” as the way to distinguish but not separate the one and the other, and it argues that indication, even (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Phenomenology as an Instrument of Critique.Sven Sellmer - 2014 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 4 (1):35-42.
    The present paper aims at showing that the phenomenological method is a crucial methodological element of every research that is based on the interpretation of utterances or texts based on experiences, like religious studies. Following the neophenomenological school, the notion of “phenomenon” is understood in a radically relative way: “A phenomenon for a person at a given point of time is a state of affairs for which this person cannot — in spite of trying to vary the presuppositions she (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Embodiment and Objectification in Illness and Health Care: Taking Phenomenology From Theory to Practice.Anthony Vincent Fernandez - 2020 - Journal of Clinical Nursing 29 (21-22):4403-4412.
    Aims and Objectives. This article uses the concept of embodiment to demonstrate a conceptual approach to applied phenomenology. -/- Background. Traditionally, qualitative researchers and healthcare professionals have been taught phenomenological methods, such as the epoché, reduction, or bracketing. These methods are typically construed as a way of avoiding biases so that one may attend to the phenomena in an open and unprejudiced way. However, it has also been argued that qualitative researchers and healthcare professionals can benefit from phenomenology’s (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. Agent Causation and the Phenomenology of Agency.Randolph Clarke - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 100 (3):747-764.
    Several philosophers claim that the phenomenology of one’s own agency conflicts with standard causal theories of action, couched in terms of causation by mental events or states. Others say that the phenomenology is prima facie incompatible with such a theory, even if in the end a reconciliation can be worked out. Here it is argued that the type of action theory in question is consistent with what can plausibly be said to be presented to us in our experience of our (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27. Husserl’s Transcendental Phenomenology and the Project of Science.Agnieszka Wesołowska - 2014 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 4 (2):391-404.
    The article presents edmund Husserl’s idea of transcendental phenomenology in the perspec‐ tive of the project of science. this aspect of Husserl’s writings was pointed out by, for example, rudolf Bernet, man ed Brelage, Iso Kern, eduard marbach, eugen Fink, Ludwig Landgrebe, and roman Ingarden. the main aim, realised in the article is to prove the main hypothesis claiming that transcendental phenomenology is closely connected with Husserl’s conception of philosophy, the idea of philosophy as a science (eidetic and transcendental). the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  49
    “The First Man Speaking”: Merleau-Ponty on Expression as the Task of Phenomenology.Anna Petronella Foultier - 2015 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 46 (3):195-212.
    This article aims to establish an understanding of Merleau-Ponty’s view of creative expression, and of its phenomenological function, setting out from the intriguing statement in his essay “Cézanne’s Doubt” that the painter (or writer or philosopher) finds himself in the situation of the first human being trying to express herself. Although the importance of primary or creative expression in Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy is well known, there is no consensus among commentators with respect to how this notion is to be understood, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29. Qualia of God: Phenomenological Materiality in Introspection, with a Reference to Advaita Vedanta.Olga Louchakova-Schwartz - 2017 - Open Theology 3 (1):257-273.
    Applying Michel Henry’s philosophical framework to the phenomenological analysis of religious experience, the author introduces a concept of material introspection and a new theory of the constitution of religious experience in phenomenologically material interiority. As opposed to ordinary mental self-scrutiny, material introspection happens when the usual outgoing attention is reverted onto embodied self-awareness in search of mystical self-knowledge or union with God. Such reversal posits the internal field of consciousness with the self-disclosure of phenomenological materiality. As shown by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Comparative Study of Phenomenology and Sankhya.D. P. Burte - manuscript
    Phenomenology, as propounded by Edmond Husserl, is an important movements in the modern western philosophy, while sÅÙkhya and its application yoga are the ancient Indian philosophical disciplines or dar±ana. This is a comparative study of phenomenology with sÅÙkhya and yoga. As per my present understanding this project is now completed. I have organized the outcome of my study in the following four papers preceded by prolegomena: Prolegomena to the comparative study of Phenomenology and SaÙkhya 1, Consciousness in Phenomenology and SÅÙkhya (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. On the Politicization of Violence Within Reductive and Non-Reductive Accounts of Violence.Gregory McCreery - 2020 - Human Studies 43 (2):269-289.
    In this paper, I reference a Paradigm Case Core Conception of Violence, which each individual has, and can share with others to various degrees. This is shown to imply that because we cannot get at violence itself, and can only interpret violence in relationships that involve humans, we cannot avoid politicizing our conceptions of violence in our empathic, intersubjective relationships. This is demonstrated by outlining various claims concerning violence, and by utilizing Edith Stein's phenomenological account on empathy and intersubjectivity, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. A Phenomenological Critique of Mindfulness.Joshua Soffer - manuscript
    How do such normative affectivities as 'unconditionally intrinsic goodness', 'spontaneous compassion', 'luminosity', 'blissfulness', ' a calm and peaceful life guided by the fundamental value of nonviolence' emerge as ultimate outcomes of a philosophy of groundlessness? Aren't they motivated by a sort of 'will to goodness', a preferencing of one affective dimension over others? It would seem that groundlessness for Francisco Varela and Evan Thompson doesn't apply to the thinking of affect and desire. Despite their claim that nihilism cannot be overcome (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Heritage of the Yoga Philosophy and Transcendental Phenomenology: The Interlocution of Knowledge and Wisdom Across Two Traditions of Philosophy.Tharakan Koshy - 2015 - In Pius V. Thomas (ed.), Knowledge, Theorization and Rights. Siliguri, West Bengal: Salesian College Publication. pp. 72-82.
    Comparative philosophy has been subjected to much criticism in the latter half of the last century, though some of these criticisms were appropriate and justified. However, in our present cultural milieu, where traditions and culture transcend their geographical boundaries, seeping through the global network of views and ideas, it seems to be a legitimate enterprise to understand one’s own traditions and culture through the critical lens of the ‘other culture’. It is such cross-cultural understanding that paved the way towards legitimizing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Scheler's Critique of Husserl's Phenomenological Understanding of "Objective a Priori".Wei Zhang - 2011 - Prolegomena 10 (2):265-280.
    On the one hand, Scheler's critique of Kant's concept of a priori benefits from Husserl to a large extent, and it complements and deepens Husserl's. On the other hand, Scheler also critiques Husserl's definition of a priori. Husserl's material a priori as ideal object primarily thanks to his so-called "Bolzano- turn". In this connection, Scheler grabs hold of the relation of Husserl to Bolzano from the very beginning. For Scheler, Husserl thinks in a "platonic" way, and still falls in a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Merleau-Ponty: A Phenomenological Philosophy of Mind and Body.Sara Heinämaa - 2013 - In Andrew Bailey (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: The Key Thinkers. Continuum. pp. 59-83.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. On Science & Phenomenology in Consciousness Studies.Contzen Pereira - unknown
    Everything around seems phenomenal and appears driven by a conscious experience. Everything is an experience and for the experiencer appears eternally phenomenal and subjective. The conscious ‘How’ can be easily explained by the many reductive based advances in science and other disciplines, but the conscious ‘Why’ persists as phenomenal. The ‘How’ however can be reduced only to a precise limit i.e. the limits of scientific exploration, beyond which it persists to be phenomenal. This paper is an inter-disciplinary understanding of how (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. A Complexity Basis for Phenomenology: How Information States at Criticality Offer a New Approach to Understanding Experience of Self, Being and Time.Alex Hankey - 2015 - Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 119:288–302.
    In the late 19th century Husserl studied our internal sense of time passing, maintaining that its deep connections into experience represent prima facie evidence for it as the basis for all investigations in the sciences: Phenomenology was born. Merleau-Ponty focused on perception pointing out that any theory of experience must in accord with established aspects of biology i.e. embodied. Recent analyses suggest that theories of experience require non-reductive, integrative information, together with a specific property connecting them to experience. Here we (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  38. What has Transparency to Do with Husserlian Phenomenology?Chad Kidd - 2019 - ProtoSociology 36:221-242.
    This paper critically evaluates Amie Thomasson’s (2003; 2005; 2006) view of the conscious mind and the interpretation of Husserl’s phenomenological reduction that it adopts. In Thomasson’s view, the phenomenological method is not an introspectionist method, but rather a “transparent” or “extrospectionist” method for acquiring epistemically privileged self-knowledge. I argue that Thomasson’s reading of Husserl’s phenomenological reduction is correct. But the view of consciousness that she pairs with it—a view of consciousness as “transparent” in the sense (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  86
    “Noema” and “Noesis” by Information After Husserl’s Phenomenology Interpreted Formally.Vasil Penchev - 2021 - Metaphysics eJournal, SSRN 14 (22):1-19.
    Along with “epoché” or his “reductions”, Husserl’s “noema” and “noesis”, being neologisms invented by him, are main concepts in phenomenology able to represent its originality. Following the trace of a recent paper (Penchev 2021 July 23), its formal and philosophical approach is extended to both correlative notions, in the present article. They are able to reveal the genesis of the world from consciousness in a transcendental method relevant to Husserl, but furthermore described formally as a process of how subjective temporality (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Phantasie and Phenomenological Inquiry - Thinking with Edmund Husserl.Andreea Smaranda Aldea - 2012 - Dissertation,
    This dissertation explores and argues for the import of the imagination (Phantasie) in Edmund Husserl's phenomenological method of inquiry. It contends that Husserl's extensive analyses of the imagination influenced how he came to conceive the phenomenological method throughout the main stages of his philosophical career. The work clarifies Husserl's complex method of investigation by considering the role of the imagination in his main methodological apparatuses: the phenomenological, eidetic, and transcendental reductions, and eidetic variation - all of which (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. The Enactive Philosophy of Embodiment: From Biological Foundations of Agency to the Phenomenology of Subjectivity.Mog Stapleton & Froese Tom - 2016 - In Miguel García-Valdecasas, José Ignacio Murillo & Nathaniel Barrett (eds.), Biology and Subjectivity Philosophical Contributions to Non-reductive Neuroscience. Springer Verlag. pp. 113-129.
    Following the philosophy of embodiment of Merleau-Ponty, Jonas and others, enactivism is a pivot point from which various areas of science can be brought into a fruitful dialogue about the nature of subjectivity. In this chapter we present the enactive conception of agency, which, in contrast to current mainstream theories of agency, is deeply and strongly embodied. In line with this thinking we argue that anything that ought to be considered a genuine agent is a biologically embodied (even if distributed) (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  42.  13
    The Ethical Dimension of Transcendental Reduction.Rosemary Lerner - 2017 - In Véronique M. Fóti & Pavlos Kontos (eds.), Phenomenology and the Primacy of the Political: Essays in Honor of Jacques Taminiaux. Springer.
    The following essay stems from my interest in finding out whether Taminiaux’s appealing and well-argued reading of the Greek and Platonic connivance between theôria and poiêsis in contrast to the fragility and contingency of human practical judgments and the human intrigue of our worldly abode—a reading that in his view is retrieved by modern and contemporary German philosophers, including Heidegger—may be applied to Husserl’s transcendental phenomenology and reduction. In my view, Taminiaux’s original and piercingly acute reading of the history (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  71
    Writing as a Man: Levinas and the Phenomenology of Eros.Stella Sandford - 1998 - Radical Philosophy 87:6-17.
    In the philosophical works of Emmanuel Levinasʼs early career, it is in a phenomenology of Eros that he claims to have uncovered the site of what he calls ʻtranscendenceʼ. This is no small claim. According to the argument of the later Totality and Infinity (1961), the history of Western philosophy is to be thought as the history of the ʻphilosophy of the sameʼ. Within this polemical generalization almost the whole of Western philosophy is characterized as a totalizing discourse which aims (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  44. The Inferential Object: Hegel’s Deduction and Reduction of Consciousness.Dean Moyar - 2016 - In Sally Sedgwick & Dina Emundts (eds.), Bewusstsein/Consciousness. De Gruyter. pp. 119-144.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  90
    Relational Matters: A Critique of Speculative Realism and a Defence of Non-Reductive Materialism.Austin Lillywhite - 2017 - Chiasma: A Site for Thought 4:13-39.
    This essay critiques the return to objects posited by certain new materialisms, most specifically the speculative realism of Harman, Meillassoux and Brassier. It argues that their “non-relational” and “autonomous” ontology represents a neo-positivist conception of reality. In place of such an atomistic ontology, I will suggest that the new materialisms develop a more productive, “non-reductive materialism”—a term drawn from analytic philosophy of mind. I will interpret Merleau-Ponty and Jean-Luc Nancy as crucial examples of such a materialism on the continental side. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Francisco Varela's View on Phenomenology in His Cognitive Interpretation.Rocco Marchitelli - 2010 - Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 3 (2):42-44.
    The philosophy by Husserl has always been a very interesting topic for cognitive scientists. Indeed, there is a strong analogy between the method of phenomenological reduction and the theories of mind developed by cognitive science in the last fifty years. The method of reduction is based on the concept of reality as a product of mind. Cognitive science seems to agree with this view but it is still difficult to elaborate a cognitive interpretation of the Husserl phenomenology (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. The Role of Positivism in Husserl’s Transcendental Phenomenology.Yusuk Lee - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 19:61-68.
    Husserl’s phenomenology opens itself with a critique of positive sciences. Husserl problematizes the hardcore presupposition of positivism that the world is a definite sort of an existential totality of objects and thus it is exhaustible with empirical data and deductive-conceptual abstraction on the basis of causalspatio-temoprality. Criticizing the wholesome reduction of nature into a physical reality and the instrumentalizing of theoretical reason, he proposes transcendental phenomenology, as an ideal form of science. Self-entitled as the genuine science, the science of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. La relación filosófica entre Husserl y Avenarius en Problemas fundamentales de la fenomenología.Patricio Agustín Perkins - 2014 - Dianoia 59 (72):25-48.
    Investigo la relación filosófica entre Avenarius y Husserl en los años del curso Problemas fundamentales de la fenomenología en relación especial con el concepto natural de mundo. Primero, expongo brevemente los temas fenomenológicos fundamentales: el concepto natural de mundo, la reducción fenomenológica y la unidad del yo. En segundo lugar, sintetizo las ideas básicas de la obra Der menschliche Weltbegriff de Avenarius. En tercer lugar, discuto la coincidencia entre Avenarius y Husserl, poniendo énfasis en la reducción primordial, y planteo las (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Intuition and the Autonomy of Philosophy.George Bealer - 1998 - In Michael DePaul & William Ramsey (eds.), Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and Its Role in Philosophical Inquiry. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 201-240.
    The phenomenology of a priori intuition is explored at length (where a priori intuition is taken to be not a form of belief but rather a form of seeming, specifically intellectual as opposed to sensory seeming). Various reductive accounts of intuition are criticized, and Humean empiricism (which, unlike radical empiricism, does admit analyticity intuitions as evidence) is shown to be epistemically self-defeating. This paper also recapitulates the defense of the thesis of the Autonomy and Authority of Philosophy given in the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   207 citations  
  50. Modal History Versus Counterfactual History: History as Intention.Vasil Penchev - 2021 - Philosophy of Science eJournal (Elsevier: SSRN) 14 (22):1-8.
    The distinction of whether real or counterfactual history makes sense only post factum. However, modal history is to be defined only as ones’ intention and thus, ex-ante. Modal history is probable history, and its probability is subjective. One needs phenomenological “epoché” in relation to its reality (respectively, counterfactuality). Thus, modal history describes historical “phenomena” in Husserl’s sense and would need a specific application of phenomenological reduction, which can be called historical reduction. Modal history doubles history just (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 998