Afterlife

Edited by K. Mitch Hodge (Masaryk University, Queen's University, Belfast)
View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories

92 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
1 — 50 / 92
Material to categorize
  1. Things Fall Apart: Reflections on the Dying of My Dad.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    In December of 2013, my Dad died of advanced Alzheimer's and a condition called Myasthenia Gravis. This is a selection of journal entries I made over the course of the two years leading up to my Dad's death. It is not a philosophical essay, but a personal reflection, in "real time" so to speak, on the nature of the dying process in relation to questions of faith, hope, despair, and the meaning of a man's life. I offer it here for (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. God’s Role in a Meaningful Life: New Reflections From Tim Mawson.Thaddeus Metz - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 10 (3):171-191.
    Characteristic of the contemporary field of life's meaning has been the combination of monism in method and naturalism in substance. That is, much of the field has sought to reduce enquiry into life's meaning to one question and to offer a single principle as an answer to it, with this principle typically focusing on ways of living in the physical world as best known by the scientific method. T. J. Mawson's new book, God and the Meanings of Life, provides fresh (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. The Argument From Brain Damage Vindicated.Rocco J. Gennaro & Yonatan I. Fishman - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 105-133.
    It has long been known that brain damage has important negative effects on one’s mental life and even eliminates one’s ability to have certain conscious experiences. It thus stands to reason that when all of one’s brain activity ceases upon death, consciousness is no longer possible and so neither is an afterlife. It seems clear that human consciousness is dependent upon functioning brains. This essay reviews some of the overall neurological evidence from brain damage studies and concludes that our argument (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Nothing Better Than Death: Insights From Sixty-Two Profound Near-Death Experiences.Ken R. Vincent & Kevin Williams (eds.) - 2014 - Kevin R. Williams.
    "Nothing Better Than Death" is a comprehensive analysis of the near-death experiences profiled on the www.near-death.com website. This book provides complete NDE testimonials, summaries of various NDEs, NDE research conclusions, a Question and Answer section, an analysis of NDEs and Christian doctrines, famous quotations about life and death, a NDE bibliography, book notes, a list of NDE resources on the Internet, and a list of NDE support groups associated with IANDS.org - the International Association for Near-Death Studies. The unusual title (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Immortal Curiosity.Attila Tanyi & Karl Karlander - 2013 - Philosophical Forum 44 (3):255-273.
    The paper discusses Bernard Williams’ argument that immortality is rationally undesirable because it leads to insufferable boredom. We first spell out Williams’ argument in the form of a dilemma. We then show that the first horn of this dilemma, namely Williams’ requirement of the constancy of character of the immortal, is defensible. We next argue against a recent attempt that accepts the dilemma, but rejects the conclusion Williams draws from it. From these we conclude that blocking the second horn of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6. Materialism and the Resurrection: Are the Prospects Improving?William Hasker - 2011 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (1):83 - 103.
    In 1999 Dean Zimmerman proposed a "falling elevator model" for a bodily resurrection consistent with materialism. Recently, he has defended the model against objections, and a slightly different version has been defended by Timothy O’Connor and Jonathan Jacobs. This article considers both sets of responses, and finds them at best partially successful; a new objection, not previously discussed, is also introduced. It is concluded that the prospects for the falling-elevator model, in either version, are not bright.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  7. On the Resurrection of the Body: Discussion with Trenton Merricks.Peter Drum - 2011 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (2):451 - 454.
    In a recent discussion, Trenton Merricks concludes that we cannot understand how God might miraculously bring it about that there will be the resurrection of the body. It is contended to the contrary, that it is not utterly mysterious how God might give us our bodies back.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Surviving Death – Mark Johnston.Steven Luper - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):884-887.
    This is a review of Johnston's book Surviving Death.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Is the Existence of Heaven Compatible with the Existence of Hell?James Cain - 2002 - Southwest Philosophy Review 18 (2):153-158.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Colonizing the Galaxies.Graham Oppy - 2000 - Sophia 39 (2):117-142.
    Paper presented in East-West Symposium on Science, Philosophy and Religion, Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy Meeting with Australasian Association of Philosophy Annual Conference, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, July 1999.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
Afterlife, Misc
  1. What Is It Like To Be Immortal?Joseph Ulatowski - forthcoming - Diametros.
    The idea of an eternal and immortal life like the one we lead now seems quite appealing because (i) it will be sufficiently like our own earth-bound life and (ii) we will have the same kinds of desires we have now to want to live an eternal life. This paper will challenge the view that we have a conception of what the conscious experience of an immortal is like, regardless of whether we might want to live it. Given that for (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Невідома розвідка професора Київської духовної академії П. П. Кудрявцева про поховання у соборі Києво-Братського монастиря.Volodymyr Bureha - 2017 - Kyivan Academy:180-194.
    Публікація вводить до наукового обігу рукопис професора Київської духовної академії Петра Кудрявцева, присвячений похованням, що були виявлені у 1878–1879 р. під підлогою Богоявленського собору Києво-Братського монастиря. Під час заміни підлоги намісник монастиря спустився у підпомістя собору, де знайшов два раніше невідомих поховання. В одній труні було тіло у священному облаченні та митрі, другу труну, кам’яну, намісник вирішив не відкривати та не оглядати. Інформацію про ці поховання Петро Кудрявцев отримав від не названого ним знавця київської старовини у 1920-ті рр. За його (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Divine Retribution in Evolutionary Perspective.Isaac Wiegman - 2016 - In Wm Curtis Holtzen & Matthew Nelson Hill (eds.), In Spirit and Truth. Claremont: CST Press. pp. 181-202.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Recension "Between Death and Resurrection A Critical Response to Recent Catholic Debate Concerning the Intermediate State". [REVIEW]Alejandro Pérez - forthcoming - Revue Théologique de Louvain 50.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Recension: “Chalamet C., Dettwiler A., Mazzocco M., Waterlot G., (Eds.), Game Over? Reconsidering Eschatology, coll. Theologische Bibliothek Töpelmann, Belin/Boston, De Gruyter, 2017.”. [REVIEW]Alejandro Pérez - 2018 - Nouvelle Revue Théologique 140:688.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Review of "Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory" by Jerry L. Walls. [REVIEW]Lloyd Strickland - 2016 - Reading Religion 1.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Divine Energies: The Consuming Fire and the Beatific Vision.A. G. Holdier - 2018 - TheoLogica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology 2 (2).
    I argue that a comprehensive ontological assessment of the beatific vision suggests that an individual’s experience of God’s face is not merely dependent on a revelation of the divine energies, but that it requires a particular mode of reception on the part of the blessed individual grounded in the reality of their faith; lacking faith, what would otherwise be experienced as the blessed vision of God is instead received as a torturous punishment. Therefore, I contend that the beatific vision is (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Agony of the Infinite: The Presence of God as Phenomenological Hell.A. G. Holdier - 2018 - In Simon Cushing (ed.), Heaven & Philosophy. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. pp. 119-135.
    Much recent academic literature on the afterlife has been focused on the justice of eternity and whether a good God could allow a person to experience eternal suffering in Hell. Two primary escapes are typically suggested to justify never-ending punishment for sinners: the traditional view focuses the blame for an individual’s condemnation away from God onto the sinner’s freely chosen actions; the universalist position denies the eternality of the punishment on the grounds that God’s inescapable love and eventual victory over (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Heaven and Philosophy.Simon Cushing (ed.) - 2017 - Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.
    This volume is a collection of essays analyzing different issues concerning the nature, possibility, and desirability of heaven as understood by the Abrahamic faiths of Judaism, Christianity. and Islam. Topics include whether or not it is possible that a mortal could, upon bodily death, become an inhabitant of heaven without loss of identity, where exactly heaven might be located, whether or not everyone should be saved, or if there might be alternative destinations (including some less fiery versions of Hell). Chapter (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Williams and the Desirability of Body‐Bound Immortality Revisited.A. G. Gorman - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy:1062-1083.
    Bernard Williams argues that human mortality is a good thing because living forever would necessarily be intolerably boring. His argument is often attacked for unfoundedly proposing asymmetrical requirements on the desirability of living for mortal and immortal lives. My first aim in this paper is to advance a new interpretation of Williams' argument that avoids these objections, drawing in part on some of his other writings to contextualize it. My second aim is to show how even the best version of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. N.T. Wright and the Body-Soul Predicament: The Presumption of Duality in Ontological Holism.D'Oleo-Ochoa Isaias - 2016 - Stromata 58 (1):111-136.
    N.T. Wright has offered Christian philosophers a proposal where it is apparently possible to hold the belief in the intermediate state-resurrection of the body and an ontological holism in the same sense at the same time. I argue that this not only creates a basic contradiction in Wright’s ontological paradigm, but also it is not a coherent and tenable proposal despite the fact one might eventually find a potential solution to such a quandary.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Personal Identity and Resurrection: How Do We Survive Our Death? Edited by Georg Gasser . Pp. Xvi, 277, Farnham, Ashgate, 2010, £55.00/$99.95. [REVIEW]Derek Michaud - 2013 - Heythrop Journal 54 (2):330-331.
    Book review of Georg Gasser, ed. “Personal Identity: How do we Survive Our Death?” (Ashgate, 2010).
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Eternity, Boredom, and One’s Part-Whole-Reality Conception.William Lauinger - 2014 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):1-28.
    Bernard Williams famously argued that eternal life is undesirable for a human because it would inevitably grow intolerably boring. I will argue against Williams and those who share his view. To make my case, I will provide an account of what staves off boredom in our current, earthly-mortal lives, and then I will draw on this account while advancing reasons for thinking that eternal life is desirable, given certain conditions. Though my response to Williams will partly overlap with some prior (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Avoiding the Afterlife in Theodicy: Victims of Suffering and the Argument From Usefulness.Robert Mark Simpson - 2008 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 13 (2):213-227.
    Contemporary proponents of theodicy generally believe that a theodi­cal reply to the evidential argument from evil must involve some appeal to the afterlife. In Richard Swinburne's writings on theodicy, however, we find two argu­ments that may be offered in opposition to this prevailing view. In this paper, these two arguments - the argument from usefulness and the argument from assumed consent - are explained and evaluated. It is suggested that both of these arguments are rendered ineffective by their failure to (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Surviving Death.Mark Johnston - 2010 - Princeton University Press.
    In this extraordinary book, Mark Johnston sets out a new understanding of personal identity and the self, thereby providing a purely naturalistic account of surviving death. Death threatens our sense of the importance of goodness. The threat can be met if there is, as Socrates said, "something in death that is better for the good than for the bad." Yet, as Johnston shows, all existing theological conceptions of the afterlife are either incoherent or at odds with the workings of nature. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  16. The Ethics of Al-Razi.Thérèse-Anne Druart - 1997 - Medieval Philosophy and Theology 6 (1):47-72.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. The Incoherence of Denying My Death.Lajos L. Brons - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 4 (2):68-98.
    The most common way of dealing with the fear of death is denying death. Such denial can take two and only two forms: strategy 1 denies the finality of death; strategy 2 denies the reality of the dying subject. Most religions opt for strategy 1, but Buddhism seems to be an example of the 2nd. All variants of strategy 1 fail, however, and a closer look at the main Buddhist argument reveals that Buddhism in fact does not follow strategy 2. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. The Science of Life Discovered From Lynnclaire Dennis' Near-Death Experience.Kevin Williams & Lynnclaire Dennis - 2014 - Afterlife.
    Elsevier, the world's leading provider of science and health information, published an academic/scientific textbook about a new mathematical discovery discovered in a near-death experience (NDE) that matches the dynamics of living and life-like (social) systems and has applications in general systems theory, universal systems modelling, human clinical molecular genetics modelling, medical informatics, astrobiology, education and other areas of study. This article is about Lynnclaire Dennis and how she brought back perhaps the greatest scientific discovery ever from a NDE. The Mereon (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Nothing Better Than Death: Insights From Sixty-Two Profound Near-Death Experiences.Kevin R. Williams, B. Sc - 2002 - Xlibris.
    "Nothing Better Than Death" is a comprehensive analysis of the near-death experiences profiled on my website at www.near-death.com. This book provides complete NDE testimonials, summaries of various NDEs, NDE research conclusions, a question and answer section, an analysis of NDEs and Christian doctrines, famous quotations about life and death, a NDE bibliography, book notes, a list of NDE resources on the Internet, and a list of NDE support groups associated with IANDS.org - the International Association for Near-Death Studies. -/- The (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. The Sanctification Argument for Purgatory.David Vander Laan - 2007 - Faith and Philosophy 24 (3):331-339.
    A recently advanced argument for purgatory hinges on the need for complete sanctification before one can enter heaven. The argument has a modal gap.The gap can be exploited to fashion a competing account of how sanctification occurs in the afterlife according to which it is in part a heavenly process.The competing account usefully complicates the overall case for purgatory and raises questions about how the notion ought to be understood.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21. Nothing Better Than Death: Insights Into Sixty-Two Near-Death Experiences.Kevin R. Williams (ed.) - 2002 - Xlibris.
    The author takes a look at sixty-two near-death experiences and shares them with the reader. They range in topics from God, Heaven, Hell, Reincarnation and Suicide, to name a few. Did these people truly see into the next world? Did they reveal hat awaits each one of us as we walk through that portal? Does it really matter what faith we are or how good or bad we are in this life? This book delivers to the reader compelling testimonies from (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Got to Have Soul.Joseph A. Baltimore - 2006 - Religious Studies 42 (4):417-430.
    Kevin Corcoran offers an account of how one can be a physicalist about human persons, deny temporal gaps in the existence of persons, and hold that there is an afterlife. I argue that Corcoran's account both violates the necessity of metaphysical identity and implausibly makes an individual's existence dependent on factors wholly extrinsic to the individual. Corcoran's defence is considered, as well as Stephen Davis's suggestions on how an account like Corcoran's can defend itself against these concerns. It is shown, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
Heaven and Hell
  1. What Does the Happy Life Require? Augustine on What the Summum Bonum Includes.Caleb Cohoe - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy.
    Many critics of religion insist that believing in a future life makes us less able to value our present activities and distracts us from accomplishing good in this world. In Augustine's case, this gets things backwards. It is while Augustine seeks to achieve happiness in this life that he is detached from suffering and dismissive of the body. Once Augustine comes to believe happiness is only attainable once the whole city of God is triumphant, he is able to compassionately engage (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Salvaging Pascal’s Wager.Elizabeth Jackson & Andrew Rogers - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (1):59-84.
    Many think that Pascal’s Wager is a hopeless failure. A primary reason for this is because a number of challenging objections have been raised to the wager, including the “many gods” objection and the “mixed strategy” objection. We argue that both objections are formal, but not substantive, problems for the wager, and that they both fail for the same reason. We then respond to additional objections to the wager. We show how a version of Pascalian reasoning succeeds, giving us a (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Divine Retribution in Evolutionary Perspective.Isaac Wiegman - 2016 - In Wm Curtis Holtzen & Matthew Nelson Hill (eds.), In Spirit and Truth. Claremont: CST Press. pp. 181-202.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Recension "Between Death and Resurrection A Critical Response to Recent Catholic Debate Concerning the Intermediate State". [REVIEW]Alejandro Pérez - forthcoming - Revue Théologique de Louvain 50.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. ONT Vol 9.Paul Bali - manuscript
    contents -/- i. Day of the Locust / Triffids -/- ii. we're wide on a Paramount soundstage -/- iii. HOLLYWOOD, an ecologic history -/- iv. yet one more site of end-time art -/- v. he's "a bookworm with bulging lobes" -/- vi. apartment is my state of being apart -/- vii. enlightenment means a weight's release .
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Recension: “Chalamet C., Dettwiler A., Mazzocco M., Waterlot G., (Eds.), Game Over? Reconsidering Eschatology, coll. Theologische Bibliothek Töpelmann, Belin/Boston, De Gruyter, 2017.”. [REVIEW]Alejandro Pérez - 2018 - Nouvelle Revue Théologique 140:688.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Infinite Value and the Best of All Possible Worlds.Nevin Climenhaga - 2018 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research:367-392.
    A common argument for atheism runs as follows: God would not create a world worse than other worlds he could have created instead. However, if God exists, he could have created a better world than this one. Therefore, God does not exist. In this paper I challenge the second premise of this argument. I argue that if God exists, our world will continue without end, with God continuing to create value-bearers, and sustaining and perfecting the value-bearers he has already created. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. Review of "Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory" by Jerry L. Walls. [REVIEW]Lloyd Strickland - 2016 - Reading Religion 1.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Heavenly Freedom, Derivative Freedom, and the Value of Free Choices.Simon Kittle - unknown - Religious Studies:1-20.
    Sennett (1999) and Pawl & Timpe (2009; 2013) attempt to show how we can praise heavenly agents for things they inevitably do in heaven by appealing to the notion of derivative freedom. Matheson (2017) has criticized this use of derivative freedom. In this essay I show why Matheson's argument is inconclusive but also how the basic point may be strengthened to undermine the use Sennett and Pawl & Timpe make of derivative freedom. I then show why Matheson is mistaken to (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. The Morally Difficult Notion of Heaven.Amir Saemi - 2018 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 92 (3):429-444.
    I will argue that Avicenna’s and Aquinas’s faith-based virtue ethics are crucially different from Aristotle’s virtue ethics, in that their ethics hinges on the theological notion of heaven, which is constitutively independent of the ethical life of the agent. As a result, their faith-based virtue ethics is objectionable. Moreover, I will also argue that the notion of heaven that Avicenna and Aquinas deploy in their moral philosophy is problematic; for it can rationally permit believers to commit morally horrendous actions. Finally, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Some Problems of Heavenly Freedom.Simon Kittle - 2018 - TheoLogica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology 2 (2):97-115.
    In this essay I identify four different problems of heavenly freedom; i.e., problems that arise for those who hold that the redeemed in heaven have free will. They are: the problem arising from God's own freedom, the problem of needing to praise the redeemed for not sinning in heaven, the problem of needing to affirm that the redeemed freely refrain from sinning, and the problem arising from a commitment to the free will defence. I explore how some of these problems (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. The Agony of the Infinite: The Presence of God as Phenomenological Hell.A. G. Holdier - 2018 - In Simon Cushing (ed.), Heaven & Philosophy. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books. pp. 119-135.
    Much recent academic literature on the afterlife has been focused on the justice of eternity and whether a good God could allow a person to experience eternal suffering in Hell. Two primary escapes are typically suggested to justify never-ending punishment for sinners: the traditional view focuses the blame for an individual’s condemnation away from God onto the sinner’s freely chosen actions; the universalist position denies the eternality of the punishment on the grounds that God’s inescapable love and eventual victory over (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Heaven and Philosophy.Simon Cushing (ed.) - 2017 - Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.
    This volume is a collection of essays analyzing different issues concerning the nature, possibility, and desirability of heaven as understood by the Abrahamic faiths of Judaism, Christianity. and Islam. Topics include whether or not it is possible that a mortal could, upon bodily death, become an inhabitant of heaven without loss of identity, where exactly heaven might be located, whether or not everyone should be saved, or if there might be alternative destinations (including some less fiery versions of Hell). Chapter (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. On Eternal Punishment: A Brief Dialogue.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    In this brief dialogue I consider the humanity and morality of the doctrine of eternal punishment.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. The “Death” of Monads: G. W. Leibniz on Death and Anti-Death.Roinila Markku - 2016 - In Charles Tandy (ed.), Death and Anti Death, vol. 14: Four Decades after Michael Polanyi, Three Centuries after G. W. Leibniz. Ann Arbor: RIA University Press. pp. 243-266.
    According to Leibniz, there is no death in the sense that the human being or animal is destroyed completely. This is due to his metaphysical pluralism which would suffer if the number of substances decreased. While animals transform into other animals after “death”, human beings are rewarded or punished of their behavior in this life. This paper presents a comprehensive account of how Leibniz thought the “death” to take place and discusses his often unclear views on the life after death. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Wagering Against Divine Hiddenness.Elizabeth Jackson - 2016 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):85-108.
    J.L. Schellenberg argues that divine hiddenness provides an argument for the conclusion that God does not exist, for if God existed he would not allow non-resistant non-belief to occur, but non-resistant non-belief does occur, so God does not exist. In this paper, I argue that the stakes involved in theistic considerations put pressure on Schellenberg’s premise that non-resistant non-belief occurs. First, I specify conditions for someone’s being a resistant non-believer. Then, I argue that many people fulfill these conditions because, given (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. The Theory of a Natural Afterlife: A Newfound, Real Possibility for What Awaits Us at Death.Bryon K. Ehlmann - 2016 - Journal of Consciousness Exploration & Research 7 (11):931-950.
    For centuries humans have considered just two main possibilities for what awaits us at death: a “nothingness” like that of our before-life or some type of supernatural afterlife. The theory of a natural afterlife defines a vastly different, real possibility. The natural afterlife embodies all of the sensory perceptions, thoughts, and emotions present in the final moment of a near-death, dreamlike experience. With death this moment becomes timeless and everlasting to the dying person—essentially, a never-ending experience. The relativeness and timelessness (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Dante's Hell, Aquinas's Moral Theory, and the Love of God.Eleonore Stump - 1986 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):181-198.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
1 — 50 / 92