Related

Contents
101 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 101
  1. Principlism and Contemporary Ethical Considers in Transgender Health Care.Luke Allen, Noah Adams, Florence Ashley, Cody Dodd, Diane Ehrensaft, Lin Fraser, Maurice Garcia, Simona Giordano, Jamison Green, Thomas Johnson, Justin Penny, Rachlin Katherine & Jaimie Veale - forthcoming - International Journal of Transgender Health.
    Background: Transgender health care is a subject of much debate among clinicians, political commentators, and policy-makers. While the World Professional Association of Transgender Health (WPATH) Standards of Care (SOC) establish clinical standards, these standards contain implied ethics but lack explicit focused discussion of ethical considerations in providing care. An ethics chapter in the SOC would enhance clinical guidelines. Aims: We aim to provide a valuable guide for healthcare professionals, and anyone interested in the ethical aspects of clinical support for gender (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Bioética y derechos humanos: sobre la representación intelectual del origen de la bioética.Mastroleo Ignacio - forthcoming - Véritas (Arequipa).
    En este trabajo se comparan dos representaciones en competencia sobre el origen de la bioética para llamar la atención sobre un posible cambio de marco teórico dentro de la disciplina. Por un lado, una representación parroquiana del origen de la bioética, centrada en problemas tecnológicos locales, y fundamentada en tradiciones culturales particulares. Por otro lado, una representación universal y pluralista, que enfrenta problemas de justicia y salud globales y que intenta buscar el fundamento normativo del discurso de la bioética en (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Bioética y derechos humanos: sobre la representación intelectual del origen de la bioética.Ignacio Mastroleo - forthcoming - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs.
    En este trabajo se comparan dos representaciones en competencia sobre el origen de la bioética para llamar la atención sobre un posible cambio de marco teórico dentro de la disciplina. Por un lado, una representación parroquiana del origen de la bioética, centrada en problemas tecnológicos locales, y fundamentada en tradiciones culturales particulares. Por otro lado, una representación universal y pluralista, que enfrenta problemas de justicia y salud globales y que intenta buscar el fundamento normativo del discurso de la bioética en (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Probability and Informed Consent.Nir Ben-Moshe, Benjamin A. Levinstein & Jonathan Livengood - 2023 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 44 (6):545-566.
    In this paper, we illustrate some serious difficulties involved in conveying information about uncertain risks and securing informed consent for risky interventions in a clinical setting. We argue that in order to secure informed consent for a medical intervention, physicians often need to do more than report a bare, numerical probability value. When probabilities are given, securing informed consent generally requires communicating how probability expressions are to be interpreted and communicating something about the quality and quantity of the evidence for (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Holism, Narrative, and Paradox: New Criteria for Settling Disputes in Personal Identity.Jaron Cheung - 2023 - Journal of Cognition and Neuroethics 9 (2):1-20.
    This paper introduces three new criteria that a theory of personal identity ought to satisfy: (1) material holism, (2) narrative unity, and (3) narrative integrity. Material holism guards against the undesirable consequence of positing the person as part and existentially distinct from the organismal whole, of which it is dependent and interconnected. Narrative unity ensures that continuity between the beginning, middle, and end of a human life is sufficiently accounted for. Narrative integrity secures fidelity and congruence between each part and (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Allocation of Scarce Life-Saving Medical Resources: Why Does Age Matter?Felipe Dossena & Milene Tonetto - 2023 - Ethic@ - An International Journal for Moral Philosophy 22 (3):1111-1128.
    In this paper, we address the moral justification problem concerning the use of age as a criterion for the allocation of scarce life-saving medical resources. We present and discuss four justifications that stand out in philosophical literature: efficiency, sufficiency, egalitarian, and prioritarian. We aim to demonstrate that all these justifications are unsatisfactory since they entail counterintuitive implications in cases involving fetuses and newborns. We then suggest another justification for the relevance of age based on the Time-Relative Interest Account of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. A Framework for Personal Respiratory Ethics.Ian Goddard - 2023 - Journal of Health Ethics 19 (1).
    The Covid-19 pandemic raises the need for an ethical framework that addresses the unique ethical challenges and questions arising from airborne infectious diseases. For example, are we ever ethically obliged to wear a face mask? If so, why and when? The Respiratory Ethics Framework (REF) herein proposes pathways to answers grounded in ethical norms and the moral principles of non-harm, beneficence and respect for personal autonomy. REF is a personal ethics wherein your ethical duty to increase your respiratory hygiene efforts—such (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Patients, doctors and risk attitudes.Nicholas Makins - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (11):737-741.
    A lively topic of debate in decision theory over recent years concerns our understanding of the different risk attitudes exhibited by decision makers. There is ample evidence that risk-averse and risk-seeking behaviours are widespread, and a growing consensus that such behaviour is rationally permissible. In the context of clinical medicine, this matter is complicated by the fact that healthcare professionals must often make choices for the benefit of their patients, but the norms of rational choice are conventionally grounded in a (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  9. Involuntary Withdrawal: A Bridge Too Far?Joanna Smolenski - 2023 - Clinical Ethics Case Studies, Hastings Bioethics Forum.
    RD, a 32-year-old male, was admitted to the hospital with hypoxic COVID pneumonia–a potentially life-threatening condition characterized by dangerously low levels of oxygen in the body- during one of the pandemic’s surges. While RD’s age gave the clinical team hope for his prognosis, his ability to recover was complicated by his being unvaccinated and having multiple comorbidities, including diabetes and obesity. His condition worsened to the point that he required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a machine that maintains the functioning of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Internal and External Paternalism.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2022 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 52 (6):673-687.
    I introduce a new distinction between two types of paternalism, which I call ‘internal’ and ‘external’ paternalism. The distinction pertains to the question of whether the paternalized subject’s current evaluative judgments are mistaken relative to a standard of correctness that is internal to her evaluative point of view—which includes her ‘true’ or ‘ideal’ self—as opposed to one that is wholly external. I argue that this distinction has important implications for (a) the distinction between weak and strong paternalism; (b) the distinction (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. The Physician as Friend to the Patient.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2022 - In Diane Jeske (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Friendship. New York, NY: Routledge. pp. 93-104.
    My question in the chapter is this: could (and should) the role of the physician be construed as that of a friend to the patient? I begin by briefly discussing the “friendship model” of the physician-patient relationship—according to which physicians and patients could, and perhaps should, be friends—as well as its history and limitations. Given these limitations, I focus on the more one-sided idea that the physician could, and perhaps should, be a friend to the patient (a “physician-qua-friend model” of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Conscientious objections, the nature of medicine, and the need for reformability.Eric J. Kim & Kyle Ferguson - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (1):63-70.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 1, Page 63-70, January 2022.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Attitudes Toward Mandatory COVID-19 Vaccination in Germany A representative analysis of data from the socio-economic panel for the year 2021.Christoph Schmidt-Petri, Carsten Schröder & Thomas Rieger - 2022 - Deutsches Ärzteblatt International 119:335-41.
    Background: Adequate immunity to COVID-19 apparently cannot be attained in Germany by voluntary vaccination alone, and therefore the introduction of mandatory COVID-19 vaccination is still under consideration. We present findings on the potential acceptance of such a requirement by the German population, and we report on the reasons given for accepting or rejecting it and how these reasons vary according to population subgroup. -/- Methods: We used representative data from the Socio-Economic Panel for the period January to December 2021. We (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Privacy, autonomy and direct-to-consumer genetic testing: a response to Vayena.Kyle van Oosterum - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (10):774-775.
    In Vayena’s article, ‘direct-to-consumer (DTC) genomics on the scales of autonomy’, she claims that there may be a strong autonomy-based argument for permitting DTC genomic services. In this response, I point out how the diminishment of one’s genetic privacy can cause a relevant autonomy-related harm which must be balanced against the autonomy-related gains DTC services provide. By drawing on conceptual connections between privacy and the Razian conception of autonomy, I show that DTC genetic testing may decrease the range of valuable (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. If fetuses are persons, abortion is a public health crisis.Bruce Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (5):465-472.
    Pro-life advocates commonly argue that fetuses have the moral status of persons, and an accompanying right to life, a view most pro-choice advocates deny. A difficulty for this pro-life position has been Judith Jarvis Thomson’s violinist analogy, in which she argues that even if the fetus is a person, abortion is often permissible because a pregnant woman is not obliged to continue to offer her body as life support. Here, we outline the moral theories underlying public health ethics, and examine (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16. A Review of “Love Drugs: The Chemical Future of Relationships”. [REVIEW]Jacob Blair - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (1):W4-W6.
    Brian Earp’s and Julian Savulescu’s provocatively titled “Love Drugs: The Chemical Future of Relationships” is a philosophically rigorous, scientifically informed, and yet wholly accessible study o...
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Bioethics: from theory to practice.O. O. Kryshtal, Mikola Chasin & Valentin Cheshko - 2021 - Киев, Украина, 02000: "Avicenna",.
    The monograph includes works of specialists and scientists - active members of the bioethical movement In Ukraine, and regular participants in national congresses on bioethics in Kyiv for the last 20 years. Over the years, bioethics has become widely used our lives It is evidenced, in particular, by the list of topics that are presented in the collective monographs, namely: philosophical and philosophical aspects of bioethics and dissemination bioethical norms and rules in various spheres of human activity. Most articles include (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Property Claims on Antibiotic Effectiveness.Cristian Timmermann - 2021 - Public Health Ethics 14 (3):256–267.
    The scope and type of property rights recognized over the effectiveness of antibiotics have a direct effect on how those claiming ownership engage in the exploitation and stewardship of this scarce resource. We examine the different property claims and rights the four major interest groups are asserting on antibiotics: (i) the inventors, (ii) those demanding that the resource be treated like any other transferable commodity, (iii) those advocating usage restrictions based on good stewardship principles and (iv) those considering the resource (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Ethical Implications of Alzheimer’s Disease Prediction in Asymptomatic Individuals Through Artificial Intelligence.Frank Ursin, Cristian Timmermann & Florian Steger - 2021 - Diagnostics 11 (3):440.
    Biomarker-based predictive tests for subjectively asymptomatic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are utilized in research today. Novel applications of artificial intelligence (AI) promise to predict the onset of AD several years in advance without determining biomarker thresholds. Until now, little attention has been paid to the new ethical challenges that AI brings to the early diagnosis in asymptomatic individuals, beyond contributing to research purposes, when we still lack adequate treatment. The aim of this paper is to explore the ethical arguments put forward (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Conscientious Objection in Medicine: Making it Public.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2020 - HEC Forum 33 (3):269-289.
    The literature on conscientious objection in medicine presents two key problems that remain unresolved: Which conscientious objections in medicine are justified, if it is not feasible for individual medical practitioners to conclusively demonstrate the genuineness or reasonableness of their objections? How does one respect both medical practitioners’ claims of conscience and patients’ interests, without leaving practitioners complicit in perceived or actual wrongdoing? My aim in this paper is to offer a new framework for conscientious objections in medicine, which, by bringing (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  21. Empowerment or Engagement? Digital Health Technologies for Mental Healthcare.Christopher Burr & Jessica Morley - 2020 - In Christopher Burr & Silvia Milano (eds.), The 2019 Yearbook of the Digital Ethics Lab. Springer Nature. pp. 67-88.
    We argue that while digital health technologies (e.g. artificial intelligence, smartphones, and virtual reality) present significant opportunities for improving the delivery of healthcare, key concepts that are used to evaluate and understand their impact can obscure significant ethical issues related to patient engagement and experience. Specifically, we focus on the concept of empowerment and ask whether it is adequate for addressing some significant ethical concerns that relate to digital health technologies for mental healthcare. We frame these concerns using five key (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  22. Coercive paternalism and the intelligence continuum.Nathan Cofnas - 2020 - Behavioural Public Policy 4 (1):88-107.
    Thaler and Sunstein advocate 'libertarian paternalism'. A libertarian paternalist changes the conditions under which people act so that their cognitive biases lead them to choose what is best for themselves. Although libertarian paternalism manipulates people, Thaler and Sunstein say that it respects their autonomy by preserving the possibility of choice. Conly argues that libertarian paternalism does not go far enough, since there is no compelling reason why we should allow people the opportunity to choose to bring disaster upon themselves if (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Vaccinating for Whom? Distinguishing between Self-Protective, Paternalistic, Altruistic and Indirect Vaccination.Steven R. Kraaijeveld - 2020 - Public Health Ethics 13 (2):190-200.
    Preventive vaccination can protect not just vaccinated individuals, but also others, which is often a central point in discussions about vaccination. To date, there has been no systematic study of self- and other-directed motives behind vaccination. This article has two major goals: first, to examine and distinguish between self- and other-directed motives behind vaccination, especially with regard to vaccinating for the sake of third parties, and second, to explore some ways in which this approach can help to clarify and guide (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  24. Continuous Glucose Monitoring as a Matter of Justice.Steven R. Kraaijeveld - 2020 - HEC Forum 33 (4):345-370.
    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic illness that requires intensive lifelong management of blood glucose concentrations by means of external insulin administration. There have been substantial developments in the ways of measuring glucose levels, which is crucial to T1D self-management. Recently, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has allowed people with T1D to keep track of their blood glucose levels in near real-time. These devices have alarms that warn users about potentially dangerous blood glucose trends, which can often be shared with (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Human Rights of Users of Humanlike Care Automata.Lantz Fleming Miller - 2020 - Human Rights Review 21 (2):181-205.
    Care is more than dispensing pills or cleaning beds. It is about responding to the entire patient. What is called “bedside manner” in medical personnel is a quality of treating the patient not as a mechanism but as a being—much like the caregiver—with desires, ideas, dreams, aspirations, and the gamut of mental and emotional character. As automata, answering an increasing functional need in care, are designed to enact care, the pressure is on their becoming more humanlike to carry out the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Can reproductive genetic manipulation save lives?G. Owen Schaefer - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy (3):381-386.
    It has recently been argued that reproductive genetic manipulation technologies like mitochondrial replacement and germline CRISPR modifications cannot be said to save anyone’s life because, counterfactually, no one would suffer more or die sooner absent the intervention. The present article argues that, on the contrary, reproductive genetic manipulations may be life-saving (and, from this, have therapeutic value) under an appropriate population health perspective. As such, popular reports of reproductive genetic manipulations potentially saving lives or preventing disease are not necessarily mistaken, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  27. Responsibility amid the social determinants of health.Ben Schwan - 2020 - Bioethics 35 (1):6-14.
    It is natural to think that there is a tight connection between whether someone is responsible for some outcome and whether it is appropriate to hold her accountable for that outcome. And this natural thought naturally extends to health: if someone is responsible for her health, then, all else being equal, she is accountable for it. Given this, some have thought that responsibility for health has an important role to play in distributing the benefits and burdens of healthcare. But there (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  28. The Dignity of Human Life: Sketching Out an 'Equal Worth' Approach.Helen Watt - 2020 - Ethics and Medicine 36 (1):7-17.
    The term “value of life” can refer to life’s intrinsic dignity: something nonincremental and time-unaffected in contrast to the fluctuating, incremental “value” of our lives, as they are longer or shorter and more or less flourishing. Human beings are equal in their basic moral importance: the moral indignities we condemn in the treatment of e.g. those with dementia reflect the ongoing human dignity that is being violated. Indignities licensed by the person in advance remain indignities, as when people might volunteer (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. The truth behind conscientious objection in medicine: a reply to Clarke, Emmerich, Minerva and Saad.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (10):681-683.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Might there be a medical conscience?Nir Ben-Moshe - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (7):835-841.
    I defend the feasibility of a medical conscience in the following sense: a medical professional can object to the prevailing medical norms because they are incorrect as medical norms. In other words, I provide an account of conscientious objection that makes use of the idea that the conscience can issue true normative claims, but the claims in question are claims about medical norms rather than about general moral norms. I further argue that in order for this line of reasoning to (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31. The internal morality of medicine: a constructivist approach.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2019 - Synthese 196 (11):4449-4467.
    Physicians frequently ask whether they should give patients what they want, usually when there are considerations pointing against doing so, such as medicine’s values and physicians’ obligations. It has been argued that the source of medicine’s values and physicians’ obligations lies in what has been dubbed “the internal morality of medicine”: medicine is a practice with an end and norms that are definitive of this practice and that determine what physicians ought to do qua physicians. In this paper, I defend (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  32. The truth behind conscientious objection in medicine.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):404-410.
    Answers to the questions of what justifies conscientious objection in medicine in general and which specific objections should be respected have proven to be elusive. In this paper, I develop a new framework for conscientious objection in medicine that is based on the idea that conscience can express true moral claims. I draw on one of the historical roots, found in Adam Smith’s impartial spectator account, of the idea that an agent’s conscience can determine the correct moral norms, even if (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  33. Artificial Wombs, Birth, and "Birth": A Response to Romanis.Nicholas Colgrove - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2019-105845.
    Recently, I argued that human subjects in artificial wombs (AWs) “share the same moral status as newborns” and so, deserve the same treatment and protections as newborns. This thesis rests on two claims: (A) “Subjects of partial ectogenesis—those that develop in utero for at time before being transferred to AWs—are newborns,” and (B) “Subjects of complete ectogenesis—those who develop in AWs entirely—share the same moral status as newborns.” In response, Elizabeth Chloe Romanis argued that the subject in an AW is (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  34. Impartiality and infectious disease: Prioritizing individuals versus the collective in antibiotic prescription.Bernadine Dao, Thomas Douglas, Alberto Giubilini, Julian Savulescu, Michael Selgelid & Nadira S. Faber - 2019 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 10 (1):63-69.
    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global public health disaster driven largely by antibiotic use in human health care. Doctors considering whether to prescribe antibiotics face an ethical conflict between upholding individual patient health and advancing public health aims. Existing literature mainly examines whether patients awaiting consultations desire or expect to receive antibiotic prescriptions, but does not report views of the wider public regarding conditions under which doctors should prescribe antibiotics. It also does not explore the ethical significance of public views (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  35. An Ethical Overview on Cloning in Nigeria.Joseph Nkang Ogar - 2019 - Journal of Social, Humanities and Administrative Sciences 5 (18):658-667.
    This work titled "An Ethical Overview on Cloning in Nigeria" analyzed the debate on cloning for which many scholars believe that cloning is not just ethically and morally acceptable, but beneficial in that they allow otherwise infertile couples to have children and permit the study of genetic diseases and indeed genetic development. This work examined cloning from an ethical/moral perspective and held the view that there is everything inherently wrong with the idea of human cloning. As a scientific discovery, it (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. The Harm of Ableism: Medical Error and Epistemic Injustice.David M. Peña-Guzmán & Joel Michael Reynolds - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (3):205-242.
    This paper argues that epistemic errors rooted in group- or identity- based biases, especially those pertaining to disability, are undertheorized in the literature on medical error. After sketching dominant taxonomies of medical error, we turn to the field of social epistemology to understand the role that epistemic schemas play in contributing to medical errors that disproportionately affect patients from marginalized social groups. We examine the effects of this unequal distribution through a detailed case study of ableism. There are four primary (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  37. Professional Objections and Healthcare: More Than a Case of Conscience.Michal Pruski - 2019 - Ethics and Medicine 35 (3):149-160.
    While there is a prolific debate surrounding the issue of conscientious objection of individuals towards performing certain clinical acts, this debate ignores the fact that there are other reasons why clinicians might wish to object providing specific services. This paper briefly discusses the idea that healthcare workers might object to providing specific services because they are against their professional judgement, they want to maintain a specific reputation, or they have pragmatic reasons. Reputation here is not simply understood as being in (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. No One Who Loves Anyone.Alison Reiheld - 2019 - Journal of Medical Humanities 40 (3):451-453.
    In this bioethical poem, the narrator reflects on the experience of their father's degenerative illness, and decisions that must be made about whether to continue life support technologies such as ventilation and nutrition/hydration. What is it that is owed to family and patient at the end of life? What must no one who loves anyone ever do to the one they love?
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Bioethics in Canada, second edition.Anthony Skelton (ed.) - 2019 - Don Mills: Oxford University Press.
    This is the second edition of the textbook Bioethics in Canada. It is the most up to date bioethics textbook on the Canadian market. Twenty-nine of its 54 contributions are by Canadians. All the chapters carried over from the first edition are revised in full (especially the chapters on obligations to the global poor, on medical assistance in dying, and on public health). It comprises *new* chapters on emerging genetic technologies and on indigenous peoples' health. It contains *new* case studies (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. La Declaración de Ginebra revisada a la luz de la nueva cultura.Gilberto Gamboa - 2018 - Persona y Bioética 22 (1):6-17.
    Se resaltan algunas peculiaridades sobre la manera como la Asociación Médica Mundial enfoca ciertos temas, ya que sus declaraciones y resoluciones reflejan cambios más o menos apreciables, que son manifiestos en los contenidos de ellas y orientan sus políticas. Se hace un comentario comparativo de las versiones de la Declaración de Ginebra de 1948 y 2017 con el Juramento hipocrático teniendo en cuenta las siguientes categorías: Carácter de la declaración; Tiempo verbal; Extensión en apotegmas o sentencias; núcleo epistémico; omisiones; innovaciones; (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Trust in health care and vaccine hesitancy.Elisabetta Lalumera - 2018 - Rivista di Estetica 68:105-122.
    Health care systems can positively influence our personal decision-making and health-related behavior only if we trust them. I propose a conceptual analysis of the trust relation between the public and a healthcare system, drawing from healthcare studies and philosophical proposals. In my account, the trust relation is based on an epistemic component, epistemic authority, and on a value component, the benevolence of the healthcare system. I argue that it is also modified by the vulnerability of the public on healthcare matters, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42. Bioethics and the Hypothesis of Extended Health.Nicolae Morar & Joshua August Skorburg - 2018 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (3):341-376.
    Dominant views about the nature of health and disease in bioethics and the philosophy of medicine have presumed the existence of a fixed, stable, individual organism as the bearer of health and disease states, and as such, the appropriate target of medical therapy and ethical concern. However, recent developments in microbial biology, neuroscience, the philosophy of cognitive science, and social and personality psychology (Ickes...
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  43. Examining Nontherapeutic Circumcision.Stephen Munzer - 2018 - Health Matrix 28:1-77.
    This study in moral, political, and legal philosophy contends that it is morally impermissible to circumcise male minors without a medical indication (nontherapeutic circumcision). Male minors have a moral anticipatory autonomy right-in-trust not to be circumcised. This right depends on norms of autonomy and bodily integrity. These norms generate three direct non-consequentialist arguments against nontherapeutic circumcision: (1) the loss of nonrenewable functional tissue, (2) genital salience, and (3) limits on a parental right to permanently modify their sons' bodies. An indirect (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. The Info-Computational Turn in Bioethics.Constantin Vică - 2018 - In Emilian Mihailov, Tenzin Wangmo, Victoria Federiuc & Bernice S. Elger (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics: European Perspectives. [Berlin]: De Gruyter Open. pp. 108-120.
    Our technological lifeworld has become an info-computational media populated by data and algorithms, an artificial environment for life and shared experiences. In this chapter, I tried to sketch three new assumptions for bioethics – it is hardly possible to substantiate ethical guidelines or an idea of normativity in an aprioristic manner; moral status is a function of data entities, not something solely human; agency is plural and thus is shared or sometimes delegated – in order to chart a proposal for (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  45. Clinical Decision-Making: The Case against the New Casuistry.Mahesh Ananth - 2017 - Issues in Law and Medicine 32 (2):143-171.
    Albert Jonsen and Stephen Toulmin have argued that the best way to resolve complex “moral” issues in clinical settings is to focus on the details of specific cases. This approach to medical decision-making, labeled ‘casuistry’, has met with much criticism in recent years. In response to this criticism, Carson Strong has attempted to salvage much of Jonsen’s and Toulmin’s version of casuistry. He concludes that much of their analysis, including Jonsen’s further elaboration about the casuistic methodology, is on the mark. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. The epistemic costs of compromise in bioethics.Katrien Devolder & Thomas Douglas - 2017 - Bioethics 32 (2):111-118.
    Bioethicists sometimes defend compromise positions, particularly when they enter debates on applied topics that have traditionally been highly polarised, such as those regarding abortion, euthanasia and embryonic stem cell research. However, defending compromise positions is often regarded with a degree of disdain. Many are intuitively attracted to the view that it is almost always problematic to defend compromise positions, in the sense that we have a significant moral reason not to do so. In this paper, we consider whether this common (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47. Universalism versus Contextualism in Bioethics.Dimitry Mentuz - 2017 - European Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences 3:75-81.
    The goal of this work is to analyse the paradigmatic concept of universal values important for bioethics such as autonomy, beneficence, justice and developing contextual approaches in resolving the moral questions on bioethics. It also aims to reveal and analyse the importance of universal approaches despite the basic non-liminality of a context and subjectivity. Keywords: autonomy, contextualism, subjectivity, universal values, metaethics, normativity.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. http://wellnesssupplement.com/nutrawill-garcinia/.Garcinia NutraWill (ed.) - 2017 - new york: oxford.
    -/- Anyone else have NutraWill Garcinia ? Doing this is compact. By far the easiest trick of getting a NutraWill Garcinia that levels a culture for a NutraWill Garcinia . That is a no brainer. If you are a novice in the world of NutraWill Garcinia, you could locate yourself overwhelmed. -/- That black box was designed to order. By all means, it isn't a much used statement. Recently I was talking to my family dealing with a symbol and the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Hermenéutica y toma de decisiones en ética clínica.Oscar Vergara - 2017 - Revista Bioética 25 (2):255 - 263.
    Resumen Hermenéutica y toma de decisiones en ética clínica La moderna hermenéutica se interesa por las condiciones de posibilidad de la comprensión humana. Sus aportaciones son de indudable interés para el campo de la ética biomédica, donde médico y paciente tratan de comprenderse mutuamente con el fin de concretar determinado proyecto de cuidados. Sin embargo, esta aproximación está lejos de ser aprovechable para formar una pauta concreta de cara a la toma de decisiones en este campo. La hermenéutica acierta al (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. Double effect reasoning: why we need it.Helen Watt - 2017 - Ethics and Medicine 33 (1):13-19.
    The “principle of double effect” is a vital tool for moral decision making and is applicable to all areas of medical practice, including (for example) end-of-life care, transplant medicine, and cases of conscientious objection. Both our ultimate and our more immediate intentions are relevant in making and evaluating choices— though side effects must be kept proportionate and can be morally conclusive when linked with some intentions. Intentions help to form the character of doctors, and of human beings generally. While hypocrisy (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 101