Switch to: References

Citations of:

Ontology

In Luciano Floridi (ed.), Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information. Oxford: Blackwell. pp. 155-166 (2003)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Universe Creation on a Computer.Gordon McCabe - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 36 (4):591-625.
    The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of the epistemology and metaphysics of universe creation on a computer. The paper begins with F.J.Tipler's argument that our experience is indistinguishable from the experience of someone embedded in a perfect computer simulation of our own universe, hence we cannot know whether or not we are part of such a computer program ourselves. Tipler's argument is treated as a special case of epistemological scepticism, in a similar vein to `brain-in-a-vat' arguments. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Representing Mental Functioning: Ontologies for Mental Health and Disease.Janna Hastings, Werner Ceusters, Mark Jensen, Kevin Mulligan & Barry Smith - 2012 - In Towards an Ontology of Mental Functioning (ICBO Workshop), Proceeedings of the Third International Conference on Biomedical Ontology.
    Mental and behavioral disorders represent a significant portion of the public health burden in all countries. The human cost of these disorders is immense, yet treatment options for sufferers are currently limited, with many patients failing to respond sufficiently to available interventions and drugs. High quality ontologies facilitate data aggregation and comparison across different disciplines, and may therefore speed up the translation of primary research into novel therapeutics. Realism-based ontologies describe entities in reality and the relationships between them in such (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Vague Size Predicates.Thomas Bittner - 2011 - Applied Ontology 6 (4):317-343.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ontologies as Integrative Tools for Plant Science.Ramona Walls, Balaji Athreya, Laurel Cooper, Justin Elser, Maria A. Gandolfo, Pankaj Jaiswal, Christopher J. Mungall, Justin Preece, Stefan Rensing, Barry Smith & Dennis W. Stevenson - 2012 - American Journal of Botany 99 (8):1263–1275.
    Bio-ontologies are essential tools for accessing and analyzing the rapidly growing pool of plant genomic and phenomic data. Ontologies provide structured vocabularies to support consistent aggregation of data and a semantic framework for automated analyses and reasoning. They are a key component of the Semantic Web. This paper provides background on what bio-ontologies are, why they are relevant to botany, and the principles of ontology development. It includes an overview of ontologies and related resources that are relevant to plant science, (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Applied Ontology: An Introduction.Katherine Munn & Barry Smith (eds.) - 2008 - Frankfurt: ontos.
    Ontology is the philosophical discipline which aims to understand how things in the world are divided into categories and how these categories are related together. This is exactly what information scientists aim for in creating structured, automated representations, called 'ontologies,' for managing information in fields such as science, government, industry, and healthcare. Currently, these systems are designed in a variety of different ways, so they cannot share data with one another. They are often idiosyncratically structured, accessible only to those who (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Ontology as the Core Discipline of Biomedical Informatics: Legacies of the Past and Recommendations for the Future Direction of Research.Barry Smith & Werner Ceusters - 2007 - In Gordana Dodig Crnkovic & Susan Stuart (eds.), Computation, Information, Cognition: The Nexus and the Liminal. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 104-122.
    The automatic integration of rapidly expanding information resources in the life sciences is one of the most challenging goals facing biomedical research today. Controlled vocabularies, terminologies, and coding systems play an important role in realizing this goal, by making it possible to draw together information from heterogeneous sources – for example pertaining to genes and proteins, drugs and diseases – secure in the knowledge that the same terms will also represent the same entities on all occasions of use. In the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Saliva Ontology: An Ontology-Based Framework for a Salivaomics Knowledge Base.Jiye Ai, Barry Smith & David Wong - 2010 - BMC Bioinformatics 11 (1):302.
    The Salivaomics Knowledge Base (SKB) is designed to serve as a computational infrastructure that can permit global exploration and utilization of data and information relevant to salivaomics. SKB is created by aligning (1) the saliva biomarker discovery and validation resources at UCLA with (2) the ontology resources developed by the OBO (Open Biomedical Ontologies) Foundry, including a new Saliva Ontology (SALO). We define the Saliva Ontology (SALO; http://www.skb.ucla.edu/SALO/) as a consensus-based controlled vocabulary of terms and relations dedicated to the salivaomics (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • An Evolutionary Approach to the Representation of Adverse Events.Werner Ceusters, Maria Capolupo, Barry Smith & Georges De Moor - 2009 - Studies in Health Technology and Informatics 150:537-541.
    One way to detect, monitor and prevent adverse events with the help of Information Technology is by using ontologies capable of representing three levels of reality: what is the case, what is believed about reality, and what is represented. We report on how Basic Formal Ontology and Referent Tracking exhibit this capability and how they are used to develop an adverse event ontology and related data annotation scheme for the European ReMINE project.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Biomedizinische Ontologien für die Praxis.M. Brochhausen & Barry Smith - 2009 - European Journal for Biomedical Informatics 1.
    Hintergrund: Biomedizinische Ontologien existieren unter anderem zur Integration von klinischen und experimentellen Daten. Um dies zu erreichen ist es erforderlich, dass die fraglichen Ontologien von einer großen Zahl von Benutzern zur Annotation von Daten verwendet werden. Wie können Ontologien das erforderliche Maß an Benutzerfreundlichkeit, Zuverlässigkeit, Kosteneffektivität und Domänenabdeckung erreichen, um weitreichende Akzeptanz herbeizuführen? -/- Material und Methoden: Wir konzentrieren uns auf zwei unterschiedliche Strategien, die zurzeit hierbei verfolgt werden. Eine davon wird von SNOMED CT im Bereich der Medizin vertreten, die (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • In Search for a Coherent Meta-Theoretical Structure : A Literature Review of Philosophy of Design.Lakew Nathan & Hedström Karin - unknown
    This paper explores the possibility of building a coherent knowledge base for philosophyof design in IS research. After identifying and categorizing what is considered as designissues in the IS field, we propose a taxonomy of design abstractions in the form of a meta-theoretical structure. Based on the proposed hierarchical taxonomy, we have conducteda concept-centric literature review on four leading IS research journals publishedbetween January 2011 and July 2016. Our result shows that the IS field struggles withmisalignment of philosophy of design (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Philosophy of Computer Science.Raymond Turner - 2013 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Ontologias para a Modelagem Multiagente de Sistemas Complexos em Ciências Cognitivas.Leonardo Lana de Carvalho, Franck Varenne & Elayne de Moura Bragra - 2014 - Ciências and Cognição 19 (1):58-75.
    Cognitive sciences as an interdisciplinary field, involving scientific disciplines (such as computer science, linguistics, psychology, neuroscience, economics, etc.), philosophical disciplines (philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, analytic philosophy, etc.) and engineering (notably knowledge engineering), have a vast theoretical and practical content, some even conflicting. In this interdisciplinary context and on computational modeling, ontologies play a crucial role in communication between disciplines and also in a process of innovation of theories, models and experiments in cognitive sciences. We propose a model for (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Expediente.Jaimir Conte - 2011 - Princípios: Revista de Filosofia (Ufrn) 16 (25):01-02.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Conocimiento sin representación y representación del conocimiento: notas para un debate.Alejandro G. Miroli - 2009 - Princípios 16 (25):91-120.
    Este trabajo ofrece los bosquejos de una teoría no representacional del conocimiento. Para ello en §1 se presentan los rasgos básicos de una teoría representacional del conocimiento y se señala su dependencia de metáforas visuales, en §2 se expone el giro idealista en que culmina dicha teoría y se revisan teorías representacionales que intentan abandonar la idea de imagen, en §3 se presenta una crítica de la razón visual y una defensa de formas de razón no visual, en §4 y (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Web Ontologies as Renewal of Classical Philosophical Ontology.Pierre Livet - 2012 - Metaphilosophy 43 (4):396-404.
    Do Web devices (addresses, tags, networks, and the rest) have counterparts in classical ontology? Yes, but they allow us also to introduce more refined distinctions. In addition, their dynamic use could inspire a dynamic reconception of classical ontology. In the process of making explicit ontological types, different types can be undistinguished at the first step (considered as “floating types”) to be defined only in a further step, one in which their function as distinguishers of other kinds of entities has to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Making AI Meaningful Again.Jobst Landgrebe & Barry Smith - 2019 - Synthese:arXiv:1901.02918v1.
    Artificial intelligence (AI) research enjoyed an initial period of enthusiasm in the 1970s and 80s. But this enthusiasm was tempered by a long interlude of frustration when genuinely useful AI applications failed to be forthcoming. Today, we are experiencing once again a period of enthusiasm, fired above all by the successes of the technology of deep neural networks or deep machine learning. In this paper we draw attention to what we take to be serious problems underlying current views of artificial (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Open Problems in the Philosophy of Information.Luciano Floridi - 2004 - Metaphilosophy 35 (4):554-582.
    The philosophy of information (PI) is a new area of research with its own field of investigation and methodology. This article, based on the Herbert A. Simon Lecture of Computing and Philosophy I gave at Carnegie Mellon University in 2001, analyses the eighteen principal open problems in PI. Section 1 introduces the analysis by outlining Herbert Simon's approach to PI. Section 2 discusses some methodological considerations about what counts as a good philosophical problem. The discussion centers on Hilbert's famous analysis (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  • The European Legal Taxonomy Syllabus: A Multi-Lingual, Multi-Level Ontology Framework to Untangle the Web of European Legal Terminology.Gianmaria Ajani, Guido Boella, Luigi di Caro, Livio Robaldo, Llio Humphreys, Sabrina Praduroux, Piercarlo Rossi & Andrea Violato - 2016 - Applied Ontology 11 (4):325-375.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Horizon for Scientific Practice: Scientific Discovery and Progress.James A. Marcum - 2010 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (2):187-215.
    In this article, I introduce the notion of horizon for scientific practice (HSP), representing limits or boundaries within which scientists ply their trade, to facilitate analysis of scientific discovery and progress. The notion includes not only constraints that delimit scientific practice, e.g. of bringing experimentation to a temporary conclusion, but also possibilities that open up scientific practice to additional scientific discovery and to further scientific progress. Importantly, it represents scientific practice as a dynamic and developmental integration of activities to investigate (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Spatio-Temporal Ontology for Geographic Information Integration.Thomas Bittner & Barry Smith - 2009 - International Journal for Geographical Information Science 23 (6):765-798.
    This paper presents an axiomatic formalization of a theory of top-level relations between three categories of entities: individuals, universals, and collections. We deal with a variety of relations between entities in these categories, including the sub-universal relation among universals and the parthood relation among individuals, as well as cross-categorial relations such as instantiation and membership. We show that an adequate understanding of the formal properties of such relations – in particular their behavior with respect to time – is critical for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Universe Creation on a Computer.Gordon McCabe - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 36 (4):591-625.
    The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of the epistemology and metaphysics of universe creation on a computer. The paper begins with F.J.Tipler's argument that our experience is indistinguishable from the experience of someone embedded in a perfect computer simulation of our own universe, hence we cannot know whether or not we are part of such a computer program ourselves. Tipler's argument is treated as a special case of epistemological scepticism, in a similar vein to `brain-in-a-vat' arguments. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations