Results for 'Daniel W. McShea'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Daniel Dennett's Intuition Pumps. [REVIEW]Brendan Shea - 2015 - Reason Papers 37 (2).
    A review of Daniel Dennett's Intuition Pumps (W.V. Norton: 2013).
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The Conditions of the Question: What Is Philosophy?Gilles Deleuze, Daniel W. Smith & Arnold I. Davidson - 1991 - Critical Inquiry 17 (3):471-478.
    Perhaps the question “What is philosophy?” can only be posed late in life, when old age has come, and with it the time to speak in concrete terms. It is a question one poses when one no longer has anything to ask for, but its consequences can be considerable. One was asking the question before, one never ceased asking it, but it was too artificial, too abstract; one expounded and dominated the question, more than being grabbed by it. There are (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3. Review of 'Wittgenstein and the End of Philosophy-by Daniel Hutto 2nd Ed. (2006).Michael Starks - 2016 - In Suicidal Utopian Delusions in the 21st Century: Philosophy, Human Nature and the Collapse of Civilization-- Articles and Reviews 2006-2017 2nd Edition Feb 2018. Michael Starks. pp. 259-270.
    One of the leading exponents of W's ideas on the language games of inner and outer (the `Two Selves' operation of our personality or intentionality or EP etc.) is the prolific Daniel Hutto (DH). His approach is called `Radical Enactivism' and is well explained in numerous recent books and papers (see my review of Radicalizing Enactivism) and a new one is appearing as I write (Evolving Enactivism). It is a development of or version of the Embodied Mind ideas now (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  27
    Review of 'Wittgenstein and the End of Philosophy-- Neither Theory nor Therapy' by Daniel Hutto 2nd Ed. (2006)(Review Revised 2019).Michael Starks - 2019 - In The Logical Structure of Human Behavior. Las Vegas, NV USA: Reality Press. pp. 364-382.
    One of the leading exponents of W's ideas on the language games of inner and outer (the `Two Selves' operation of our personality or intentionality or EP etc.) is the prolific Daniel Hutto (DH). His approach is called `Radical Enactivism' and is well explained in numerous recent books and papers (see my review of Radicalizing Enactivism) and a new one is appearing as I write (Evolving Enactivism). It is a development of or version of the Embodied Mind ideas now (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Pure Form of Time and the Powers of the False.Daniel W. Smith - 2019 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 81 (1):29-51.
    This paper explores the relation of the theory of time and the theory of truth in Deleuze’s philosophy. According to Deleuze, a mutation in our conception of time occurred with Kant. In antiquity, time had been subordinated to movement, it was the measure or the “number of movement” (Aristotle). In Kant, this relation is inverted: time is no longer subordinated to movement but assumes an independence and autonomy of its own for the first time. In Deleuze’s phrasing, time becomes the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Deleuze and the Question of Desire: Toward an Immanent Theory of Ethics.Daniel W. Smith - 2007 - Parrhesia 2:66-78.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  7. Berkeley's Stoic Notion of Spiritual Substance.Stephen H. Daniel - 2008 - In New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books.
    For Berkeley, minds are not Cartesian spiritual substances because they cannot be said to exist (even if only conceptually) abstracted from their activities. Similarly, Berkeley's notion of mind differs from Locke's in that, for Berkeley, minds are not abstract substrata in which ideas inhere. Instead, Berkeley redefines what it means for the mind to be a substance in a way consistent with the Stoic logic of 17th century Ramists on which Leibniz and Jonathan Edwards draw. This view of mind, I (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8. Berkeley's Pantheistic Discourse.Stephen H. Daniel - 2001 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 49 (3):179-194.
    Berkeley's immaterialism has more in common with views developed by Henry More, the mathematician Joseph Raphson, John Toland, and Jonathan Edwards than those of thinkers with whom he is commonly associated (e.g., Malebranche and Locke). The key for recognizing their similarities lies in appreciating how they understand St. Paul's remark that in God "we live and move and have our being" as an invitation to think to God as the space of discourse in which minds and ideas are identified. This (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. The Ramist Context of Berkeley's Philosophy.Stephen H. Daniel - 2001 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (3):487 – 505.
    Berkeley's doctrines about mind, the language of nature, substance, minima sensibilia, notions, abstract ideas, inference, and freedom appropriate principles developed by the 16th-century logician Peter Ramus and his 17th-century followers (e.g., Alexander Richardson, William Ames, John Milton). Even though Berkeley expresses himself in Cartesian or Lockean terms, he relies on a Ramist way of thinking that is not a form of mere rhetoric or pedagogy but a logic and ontology grounded in Stoicism. This article summarizes the central features of Ramism, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10. Berkeley's Christian Neoplatonism, Archetypes, and Divine Ideas.Stephen H. Daniel - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):239-258.
    Berkeley's doctrine of archetypes explains how God perceives and can have the same ideas as finite minds. His appeal of Christian neo-Platonism opens up a way to understand how the relation of mind, ideas, and their union is modeled on the Cappadocian church fathers' account of the persons of the trinity. This way of understanding Berkeley indicates why he, in contrast to Descartes or Locke, thinks that mind (spiritual substance) and ideas (the object of mind) cannot exist or be thought (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  11. Berkeley's Rejection of Divine Analogy.Stephen H. Daniel - 2011 - Science Et Esprit 63 (2):149-161.
    Berkeley argues that claims about divine predication (e.g., God is wise or exists) should be understood literally rather than analogically, because like all spirits (i.e., causes), God is intelligible only in terms of the extent of his effects. By focusing on the harmony and order of nature, Berkeley thus unites his view of God with his doctrines of mind, force, grace, and power, and avoids challenges to religious claims that are raised by appeals to analogy. The essay concludes by showing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12. 7000 B. C.: Apparatus of Capture.Daniel W. Smith - 2018 - In Henry Somers-Hall, James Williams & Jeffrey Bell (eds.), A Thousand Plateaus and Philosophy. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. pp. 223-241.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Edwards' Occasionalism.Stephen H. Daniel - 2010 - In Don Schweitzer (ed.), Jonathan Edwards as Contemporary. Peter Lang. pp. 1-14.
    Instead of focusing on the Malebranche-Edwards connection regarding occasionalism as if minds are distinct from the ideas they have, I focus on how finite minds are particular expressions of God's will that there be the distinctions by which ideas are identified and differentiated. This avoids problems, created in the accounts of Fiering, Lee, and especially Crisp, about the inherently idealist character of Edwards' occasionalism.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Berkeley, Suárez, and the Esse-Existere Distinction.Stephen H. Daniel - 2000 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 74 (4):621-636.
    For Berkeley, a thing's existence 'esse' is nothing more than its being perceived 'as that thing'. It makes no sense to ask (with Samuel Johnson) about the 'esse' of the mind or the specific act of perception, for that would be like asking what it means for existence to exist. Berkeley's "existere is percipi or percipere" (NB 429) thus carefully adopts the scholastic distinction between 'esse' and 'existere' ignored by Locke and others committed to a substantialist notion of mind. Following (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  15. Berkeley's Doctrine of Mind and the “Black List Hypothesis”: A Dialogue.Stephen H. Daniel - 2013 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (1):24-41.
    Clues about what Berkeley was planning to say about mind in his now-lost second volume of the Principles seem to abound in his Notebooks. However, commentators have been reluctant to use his unpublished entries to explicate his remarks about spiritual substances in the Principles and Dialogues for three reasons. First, it has proven difficult to reconcile the seemingly Humean bundle theory of the self in the Notebooks with Berkeley's published characterization of spirits as “active beings or principles.” Second, the fact (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Edwards as Philosopher.Stephen H. Daniel - 2007 - In Stephen J. Stein (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Jonathan Edwards. Cambridge University Press. pp. 162-80.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. How Berkeley's Works Are Interpreted.Stephen H. Daniel - 2010 - In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Science and Religion in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
    Instead of interpreting Berkeley in terms of the standard way of relating him to Descartes, Malebranche, and Locke, I suggest we consider relating him to other figures (e.g., Stoics, Ramists, Suarez, Spinoza, Leibniz). This allows us to integrate his published and unpublished work, and reveals how his philosophic and non-philosophic work are much more aligned with one another. I indicate how his (1) theory of powers, (2) "bundle theory" of the mind, and (3) doctrine of "innate ideas" are understood in (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. The Concept of the Simulacrum: Deleuze and the Overturning of Platonism.Daniel W. Smith - 2005 - Continental Philosophy Review 38 (1-2):89-123.
    This article examines Gilles Deleuze’s concept of the simulacrum, which Deleuze formulated in the context of his reading of Nietzsche’s project of “overturning Platonism.” The essential Platonic distinction, Deleuze argues, is more profound than the speculative distinction between model and copy, original and image. The deeper, practical distinction moves between two kinds of images or eidolon, for which the Platonic Idea is meant to provide a concrete criterion of selection “Copies” or icons (eikones) are well-grounded claimants to the transcendent Idea, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  19. Deleuze’s Theory of Sensation: Overcoming the Kantian Duality.Daniel W. Smith - 1996 - In Paul Patton (ed.), Deleuze: A Critical Reader. New York: Blackwell. pp. 29-56.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  20. La cosmología presocrática.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2015 - Hypnos. Revista Do Centro de Estudos da Antiguidade 34:132-139.
    This article aims at clarifying some issues raised by a recent book of Daniel W. Graham about the Presocratic cosmology. It particularly intends to shed some light on the understanding of Anaxagoras’ universe by suggesting some reasons why, despite Graham’s opinion, it is still possible to think that the stars were flat according to him. Another goal is highlighting the importance of the comprehensive physical theory of Anaxagoras, based on a circular motion called perichoresis, which would explain diverse phenomena (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Sense and Literality: Why There Are No Metaphors in Deleuze’s Philosophy.Daniel W. Smith - 2019 - In Dorothea Olkowski & Eftichis Pirovolakis (eds.), Deleuze and Guattari's Philosophy of Freedom: Freedom’s Refrains. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. pp. 44-67.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Mathematics and the Theory of Multiplicities: Badiou and Deleuze Revisited.Daniel W. Smith - 2003 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):411-449.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  23.  88
    Immanence and Desire: Deleuze and the Political.Daniel W. Smith - 2019 - Stasis 7 (1):124-138.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Speech Acts: The Contemporary Theoretical Landscape.Daniel W. Harris, Daniel Fogal & Matt Moss - 2018 - In Daniel Fogal, Matt Moss & Daniel Harris (eds.), New Work on Speech Acts. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    What makes it the case that an utterance constitutes an illocutionary act of a given kind? This is the central question of speech-act theory. Answers to it—i.e., theories of speech acts—have proliferated. Our main goal in this chapter is to clarify the logical space into which these different theories fit. -/- We begin, in Section 1, by dividing theories of speech acts into five families, each distinguished from the others by its account of the key ingredients in illocutionary acts. Are (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25. Flow, Code and Stock: A Note on Deleuze's Political Philosophy.Daniel W. Smith - 2011 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 5 (Suppl):36-55.
    In Anti-Oedipus, Deleuze and Guattari claim that a general theory of society must be a generalised theory of flows. This is hardly a straightforward claim, and this paper attempts to examine the grounds for it. Why should socio-political theory be based on a theory of flows rather than, say, a theory of the social contract, or a theory of the State, or the questions of legitimation or revolution, or numerous other possible candidates? The concept of flow (and the related notions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Essays on Deleuze.Daniel W. Smith - 2012 - Edinburgh University Press.
    Gilles Deleuze was one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth-century, and Smith is widely recognized to be one of his most penetrating interpreters, as well as an important philosophical voice in his own right. Combining his most important pieces over the last fifteen years along with two new essays, this book is Smith 's definitive treatise on Deleuze. The essays are divided into four sections, which cover Deleuze's use of the history of philosophy, an overview of his philosophical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  27.  58
    Gilles Deleuze: An Introduction.Daniel W. Smith - 2010 - In Alan Schrift (ed.), History of Continental Philosophy, Vol. 6: Poststructuralism and Critical Theory's Second Generation. London: Acumen. pp. 91-110.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  66
    André Leroi-Gourhan.Daniel W. Smith - 2019 - In Graham Jones & Jon Roffe (eds.), Deleluze's Philosophical Lineage II. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. pp. 255-274.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  79
    Against Social Evolution: Deleuze and Guattari's Social Topology.Daniel W. Smith - 2019 - In Michael James Bennett & Tano S. Posteraro (eds.), Deleuze and Evolutionary Theory. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. pp. 141-158.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  66
    Deleuze, Technology, and Thought.Daniel W. Smith - 2018 - Tamkang Review 49 (1):33-52.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  98
    Deleuze and the Liberal Tradition: Normativity, Freedom and Judgement.Daniel W. Smith - 2003 - Economy and Society 32 (2):299-324.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  32.  94
    The Doctrine of Univocity: Deleuze's Ontology of Immanence.Daniel W. Smith - 2001 - In Mary Bryden (ed.), Deleuze and Religion. London: Routledge. pp. 167-183.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  33. Deleuze on Leibniz : Difference, Continuity, and the Calculus.Daniel W. Smith - 2005 - In Current Continental Theory and Modern Philosophy. Northwestern University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  34.  91
    Axiomatics and Problematics as Two Modes of Formalisation: Deleuze's Epistemology of Mathematics'.Daniel W. Smith - 2006 - In Simon B. Duffy (ed.), Virtual Mathematics: The Logic of Difference. Clinamen. pp. 145--168.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  65
    Nietzsche and the Vicious Circle.Pierre Klossowski & Daniel W. Smith - 1999 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 18:84-89.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  36. Deleuze and Derrida, Immanence and Transcendence.Daniel W. Smith - 2003 - In Paul Patton & John Protevi (eds.), Between Deleuze and Derrida. London: Continuum. pp. 46-66.
    This paper will attempt to assess the primary differences between what I take to be the two primary philosophical "traditions" in contemporary French philosophy, using Derrida (transcendence) and Deleuze (immanence) as exemplary representatives. The body of the paper will examine the use of these terms in three different areas of philosophy on which Derrida and Deleuze have both written: subjectivity, ontology, and epistemology. (1) In the field of subjectivity, the notion of the subject has been critiqued in two manners, either (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37. Nauk O Univoknostf: Deleuzova ontologija imanence.Daniel W. Smith - 2001 - Filozofski Vestnik 22 (1):163-179.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  38.  89
    Pierre Klossowski: From Theatrical Theology to Counter-Utopia.Daniel W. Smith - 2017 - In Nicolae Morar, Thomas Nail & Daniel W. Smith (eds.), Pierre Klossowski, Living Currency. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 1-40.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Deleuze, Hegel, and the Post-Kantian Tradition.Daniel W. Smith - 2000 - Philosophy Today 44 (Supplement):119-131.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  70
    Metaphysics and Ontology.Daniel W. Smith - 2009 - In Beth Lord & John Mullarkey (eds.), Continuum Companion to Continental Philosophy. London: Continuum. pp. 55-68.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. The Conditions of the New.Daniel W. Smith - 2007 - Deleuze and Guatarri Studies 1 (1):1-21.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  42.  46
    The Conflict of the Faculties in Hume: The Position of "Of the Standard of Taste" in the Principles of Human Nature.Daniel W. Smith - manuscript
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. A Life of Pure Immanence: Deleuze's "Critque Et Clinique" Project.Daniel W. Smith - 1997 - Philosophy Today 41 (Supplement):168-179.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  44.  70
    Raymond Ruyer and the Metaphysics of Absolute Forms.Daniel W. Smith - 2017 - Parrhesia 27:116-128.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  62
    How Much Writing is Enough? (Conference Paper).James Brusseau - manuscript
    The difference between Derrida and Deleuze has been debated in terms of their understandings and uses of the historical distinction between Being and beings. Daniel W. Smith intersects with the question when discussing transcendence and immanence. Clair Colebrook intersects when discussing materialism. Paul Patton intersects when distinguishing the unconditioned and conditioned. This essay moves along with their ideas, and contributes to the discussion by re-inscribing the debate in terms of nouns and verbs. The conclusion suggests that the noun/verb prism (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Wittgenstein’s Influence on Austin’s Philosophy of Language.Daniel W. Harris & Elmar Unnsteinsson - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):371-395.
    Many philosophers have assumed, without argument, that Wittgenstein influenced Austin. More often, however, this is vehemently denied, especially by those who knew Austin personally. We compile and assess the currently available evidence for Wittgenstein’s influence on Austin’s philosophy of language. Surprisingly, this has not been done before in any detail. On the basis of both textual and circumstantial evidence we show that Austin’s work demonstrates substantial engagement with Wittgenstein’s later philosophy. In particular, Austin’s 1940 paper, ‘The Meaning of a Word’, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  62
    On the Fragility of Things (on William Connolly).Daniel W. Smith - 2015 - Theory and Event 18 (3).
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  57
    The Inverse Side of the Structure: Žižek on Deleuze on Lacan.Daniel W. Smith - 2004 - Criticism: A Quarterly for Literature and the Arts 46 (4):635-650.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  42
    "What I Hear is Thinking Too": Deleuze and Guattari Go Pop.Daniel W. Smith & Timothy S. Murphy - 2001 - Echo 3 (1).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  42
    Critical, Clinical.Daniel W. Smith - 2011 - In Charles J. Stivale (ed.), Gilles Deleuze: Key Concepts. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000