Results for 'Louvre Museum'

66 found
Order:
  1. Louvre Museum - Paintings.Nicolae Sfetcu - 2018 - Drobeta Turnu Severin: MultiMedia Publishing.
    The Louvre Museum is the largest of the world's art museums by its exhibition surface. These represent the Western art of the Middle Ages in 1848, those of the ancient civilizations that preceded and influenced it (Oriental, Egyptian, Greek, Etruscan and Roman), and the arts of early Christians and Islam. At the origin of the Louvre existed a castle, built by King Philip Augustus in 1190, and occupying the southwest quarter of the current Cour Carrée. In 1594, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  39
    Falling in Love with a Film (Series).Hans Maes & Katrien Schaubroeck - 2021 - In Katrien Schaubroeck & Hans Maes (eds.), Before Sunrise, Before Sunset, Before Midnight: A Philosophical Exploration. Routledge.
    Judging works of art is one thing. Loving a work of art is something else. When you visit a museum like the Louvre you make hundreds of judgements in the space of just a couple of hours. But you may grow to love only one or a handful of works over the course of your entire life. Depending on the art form you are most aligned with, this can be a painting, a novel, a poem, a song, a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  44
    Il Louvre a Teheran, in equilibrio tra cultura e politica.Asma Mehan & Miriam Bodino - 2018 - Il Giornale Dell'architettura.
    In occasione dell’ottantesimo anniversario del Museo nazionale dell’Iran, una mostra ospita circa cinquanta opere del Louvre parigino e apre riflessioni sulla diplomazia culturale.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. “From Museum Walls to Facebook Walls”*. A New Public Space for Art.Gizela Horvath - 2014 - In Gizela Horvath, Rozalia Klara Bako & Eva Biro Kaszas (eds.), Ten Years of Facebook. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Argumentation and Rhetoric. Partium Kiado. pp. 73-88.
    The ‘museal’ approach to art has been attacked from many angles in the last decade; the main issue raised by most of these attacks was that such an approach would promote a certain idea of art which has little to do with real-life or the layman’s interest. Some artists have protested by stepping out of the museum space with projects deliberately designed as non-museum items (performance, land-art, public art etc.). Art, however, is always meant for a public, so, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. Museums and Digital Culture: New Perspectives and Research.Tula Giannini & Jonathan P. Bowen - 2019 - London, UK: Springer.
    This richly illustrated book offers new perspectives and research on how digital culture is transforming museums in the 21st century, as they strive to keep pace with emerging technologies driving cultural and social change, played out not only in today’s pervasive networked environment of the Internet and Web, but in everyday life, from home to work and on city streets. In a world where digital culture has redefined human information behavior as life in code and digits, increasingly it dominates human (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  25
    How Museums Make Us Feel: Affective Niche Construction and the Museum of Non-Objective Painting.Jussi A. Saarinen - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (4):543-558.
    Art museums are built to elicit a wide variety of feelings, emotions, and moods from their visitors. While these effects are primarily achieved through the artworks on display, museums commonly deploy numerous other affect-inducing resources as well, including architectural solutions, audio guides, lighting fixtures, and informational texts. Art museums can thus be regarded as spaces that are designed to influence affective experiencing through multiple structures and mechanisms. At face value, this may seem like a somewhat self-evident and trivial statement to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. What Do We See in Museums?Graham Oddie - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:217-240.
    I address two related questions. First: what value is there in visiting a museum and becoming acquainted with the objects on display? For art museums the answer seems obvious: we go to experience valuable works of art, and experiencing valuable works of art is itself valuable. In this paper I focus on non-art museums, and while these may house aesthetically valuable objects, that is not their primary purpose, and at least some of the objects they house might not be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  50
    The Museum on the Edge of Forever.Jenny Walklate - 2014 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 36 (1):49-76.
    This article argues that understanding any space or site relies on a knowledge of its fourth dimension - the timescape. It will explore this by situating the investigation in the museum - a place of heightened contrivance which could easily be shallowly interpreted as "mere style". It will defend a new method of investigating museum temporality which combines both phenomenology and literary theory, and will replace the idea of geo-epistemology with geochronic epistemology: an understanding of context and situation (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  26
    Museums and Balanced Scorecard- A customer perspective adaptation.Carolina Asuaga & Carina Peombo - 2010 - Revista Costos y Gestión (78):28-39.
    This paper is about Cultural Organizations Management, more specifically, in Museums Management, and it is framework in Balanced Scorecard. The paper focuses on one of the perspectives, known as the customer perspective, which is divided into two parallel dimensions, the Visitor's Perspective, and the Social Demand Perspective. It should be noted that typology of museums is diverse, and each organization has a unique mission, a strategic plan according to it and, therefore, its own balanced scorecard. But there may be common (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Mounting Frustration: The Art Museum in the Age of Black Power, by Susan E. Cahan, and Museums and Public Art: A Feminist Vision, by Hilde Hein. [REVIEW]Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (1):91-94.
    These two books challenge museums--the predominant and continually evolving institutions of art delivery--in order to uncover and expose the rampant political biases and hidden strategies that their founders, administrators, and boards of trustees have utilized in order to maintain the preferred status quo of predominantly white male power.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  70
    An Ethnographic Museum and its Contribution to Tourism Development: The Case of Aksum.Teklebrhan Legese Gebreyesus - 2019 - African Journal of Hospitality,Tourism and Leisure 8 (1).
    Among the various functions of museums are the notions that they attract, entertain and arose curiosity in visitors, which leads to questioning thus promoting learning. This 21st century shows many new needs and preoccupations of contemporary society relating to museums. Although there are many, access to museums, professionalism, the nature of museums, issues of collection and management are all highlighted as being particularly significant. Running across all these issues is the recurrent theme of the relationship between a museum and (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Teaching Philosophy Through Paintings: A Museum Workshop.Savvas Ioannou, Kypros Georgiou & Ourania Maria Ventista - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 38 (1):62-83.
    There is wide research about the Philosophy for/with Children program. However, there is not any known attempt to investigate how a philosophical discussion can be implemented through a museum workshop. The present research aims to discuss aesthetic and epistemological issues with primary school children through a temporary art exhibition in a museum in Cyprus. Certainly, paintings have been used successfully to connect philosophical topics with the experiences of the children. We suggest, though, that this is not as innovative (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  70
    Escaping the Museum.David Kolb - unknown - AG3. The Third International Arakawa and Gins: Architecture and Philosophy Conference Sponsored at Griffith University in Brisbane.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  60
    Art/Anthropology/Museums: Revulsions and Revolutions.Christopher B. Steiner - 2002 - In Jeremy MacClancy (ed.), Exotic No More: Anthropology on the Front Lines. University of Chicago Press. pp. 399--417.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Chornobyl as an Open Air Museum: A Polysemic Exploration of Power and Inner Self.Olga Bertelsen - 2018 - Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 5:1-36.
    This study focuses on nuclear tourism, which flourished a decade ago in the Exclusion Zone, a regimented area around the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ukraine) established in 1986, where the largest recorded nuclear explosion in human history occurred. The mass pilgrimage movement transformed the place into an open air museum, a space that preserves the remnants of Soviet culture, revealing human tragedies of displacement and deaths, and the nature of state nuclear power. This study examines the impact of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Why Display? Representing Holograms in Museum Collections.Sean F. Johnston - 2009 - In Peter Morris & Klaus Staubermann (eds.), Illuminating Instruments. Washington, DC, USA: pp. 97-116.
    The actual and potential uses of holograms in museum displays, and the philosophy of knowledge and progress that they represent. Magazine journalists, museum curators, and historians sometimes face similar challenges in making topics or technologies relevant to wider audiences. To varying degrees, they must justify the significance of their subjects of study by identifying a newsworthy slant, a pedagogical role, or an analytical purpose. This chasse au trésor may skew historical story telling itself. In science and technology studies, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  59
    Antony Kamm and Malcolm Baird, John Logie Baird: A Life. Edinburgh: National Museums of Scotland Publishing, 2002. Pp. XII+465. Isbn 1-901663-76-0. 25.00. [REVIEW]Sean F. Johnston - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Science 37 (2):221-222.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Repatriation and the Radical Redistribution of Art.Erich Hatala Matthes - 2017 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 4:931-953.
    Museums are home to millions of artworks and cultural artifacts, some of which have made their way to these institutions through unjust means. Some argue that these objects should be repatriated (i.e. returned to their country or culture of origin). However, these arguments face a series of philosophical challenges. In particular, repatriation, even if justified, is often portrayed as contrary to the aims and values of museums. However, in this paper, I argue that some of the very considerations museums appeal (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19. Four Quine’s Inconsistencies.Gustavo Picazo - 2015 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 22 (2):163-177.
    In this paper I argue that the idiosyncrasy of linguistic competence fosters semantic conceptions in which meanings are taken for granted, such as the one that Quine calls ‘uncritical semantics’ or ‘the myth of the museum’. This is due to the degree of automaticity in the use of language which is needed for fluent conversation. Indeed, fluent conversation requires that we speakers instinctively associate each word or sentence with its meaning (or linguistic use), and instinctively resort to the conceptual (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. The Space of Reception: Framing Autonomy and Collaboration.Jennifer A. McMahon & Carol A. Gilchrist - 2017 - In Brad Buckley & John Conomos (eds.), Who Runs the Artworld: Money, Power and Ethics. Faringdon, UK: Libri Publishing. pp. 201-212.
    In this paper we analyse the ideas implicit in the style of exhibition favoured by contemporary galleries and museums, and argue that unless the audience is empowered to ascribe meaning and significance to artwork through critical dialogue, the power not only of the audience is undermined but also of art. We argue that galleries and museums preside over an experience economy devoid of art, unless (i) indeterminacy is understood, (ii) the critical rather than coercive nature of art is facilitated, and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Ugo Nespolo: a proposito di rappresentazioni.Elisa Caldarola - 2015 - Rivista di Estetica 58.
    An analysis of three pictorial works by Ugo Nespolo is put forward: "Barbe posticce" (1977); "Guardar Manzoni" (1974); "Il museo: Fontana" (1975). It is claimed that such works embody meditations on the concept and the varieties of representation, that they prompt critical reflections on the role of museums in art-making, and that they suggest an alternative route to that of the 'dematerialization' of the art object for the understanding of contemporary art.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  78
    The Vanity of Small Differences: Empirical Studies of Artistic Value and Extrinsic Factors.Shen-yi Liao, Aaron Meskin & Jade Fletcher - 2020 - Aesthetic Investigations 4 (1):412-427.
    To what extent are factors that are extrinsic to the artwork relevant to judgments of artistic value? One might approach this question using traditional philosophical methods, but one can also approach it using empirical methods; that is, by doing experimental philosophical aesthetics. This paper provides an example of the latter approach. We report two empirical studies that examine the significance of three sorts of extrinsic factors for judgments of artistic value: the causal-historical factor of contagion, the ontological factor of uniqueness, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  85
    The Modern Paradigm of Art and Its Frontiers.Gizela Horvath - 2019 - In Mario do Rosario Monteiro (ed.), Modernity, Frontiers and Revolutions. Boca Raton London New York Leiden: pp. 314-324.
    Abstract The awakening of art to self-awareness and the statement of its autonomy are modern phenomena. The way we think about art in the modern age may be derived from the Kantian “beauty without concept”. Beautiful art is the work of the genius, who creates a work of art that is valuable in itself and is admired in museums by the public. That which I call here “the modern paradigm of art” is based on an absence: the non-conceptuality of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  33
    Art and the Body: The Tatsuno Art Project.Akiko Kasuya - 2015 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 5 (1):267-274.
    The author discusses the relationship between art and the body, as exemplified by the similarities and differences in the works of: two Japanese artists, Matsui Chie (b. 1960) and Higashikage Tomohiro (b. 1978); and the Polish artist, Mirosław Bałka (b. 1958). These examples are referred to in the context of a unique project recently conducted in Japan — the Tatsuno Art Project 2013. Held with the support of the Agency for Cultural Affairs of Japan, the project aims to present contemporary (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. The Uses of Aesthetic Testimony.C. Thi Nguyen - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):19-36.
    The current debate over aesthetic testimony typically focuses on cases of doxastic repetition — where, when an agent, on receiving aesthetic testimony that p, acquires the belief that p without qualification. I suggest that we broaden the set of cases under consideration. I consider a number of cases of action from testimony, including reconsidering a disliked album based on testimony, and choosing an artistic educational institution from testimony. But this cannot simply be explained by supposing that testimony is usable for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26. 弥生時代中期における戦争:人骨と人口動態の関係から(Prehistoric Warfare in the Middle Phase of the Yayoi Period in Japan : Human Skeletal Remains and Demography).Tomomi Nakagawa, Hisashi Nakao, Kohei Tamura, Yuji Yamaguchi, Naoko Matsumoto & Takehiko Matsugi - 2019 - Journal of Computer Archaeology 1 (24):10-29.
    It has been commonly claimed that prehistoric warfare in Japan began in the Yayoi period. Population increases due to the introduction of agriculture from the Korean Peninsula to Japan resulted in the lack of land for cultivation and resources for the population, eventually triggering competition over land. This hypothesis has been supported by the demographic data inferred from historical changes in Kamekan, a burial system used especially in the Kyushu area in the Yayoi period. The present study aims to examine (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  86
    The Epistemic Basic Structure.Faik Kurtulmus - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (5):818-835.
    The epistemic basic structure of a society consists of those institutions that have the greatest impact on individuals’ opportunity to obtain knowledge on questions they have an interest in as citizens, individuals, and public officials. It plays a central role in the production and dissemination of knowledge and in ensuring that people have the capability to assimilate this knowledge. It includes institutions of science and education, the media, search engines, libraries, museums, think tanks, and various government agencies. This article identifies (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. Semantics in Support of Biodiversity: An Introduction to the Biological Collections Ontology and Related Ontologies.Ramona L. Walls, John Deck, Robert Guralnik, Steve Baskauf, Reed Beaman, Stanley Blum, Shawn Bowers, Pier Luigi Buttigieg, Neil Davies, Dag Endresen, Maria Alejandra Gandolfo, Robert Hanner, Alyssa Janning, Barry Smith & Others - 2014 - PLoS ONE 9 (3):1-13.
    The study of biodiversity spans many disciplines and includes data pertaining to species distributions and abundances, genetic sequences, trait measurements, and ecological niches, complemented by information on collection and measurement protocols. A review of the current landscape of metadata standards and ontologies in biodiversity science suggests that existing standards such as the Darwin Core terminology are inadequate for describing biodiversity data in a semantically meaningful and computationally useful way. Existing ontologies, such as the Gene Ontology and others in the Open (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  29. Drei Briefe Von Hans Kleinpeter an Ernst Mach Über Nietzsche.Pietro Gori - 2011 - Nietzsche-Studien 40 (1):290-298.
    Hans Kleinpeter’s letters to Ernst Mach held in the Deutsches Museum Archive in Munich are of the greatest importance in order to learn some details of the working relationship between these scholars. In the three letters here entirely published for the first time Kleinpeter shows his interest for Nietzsche’s thought, and states that some of the latter’s ideas are in compliance with Mach’s epistemology.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  30.  50
    Drei briefe Von Hans kleinpeter an Ernst Mach über Nietzsche.Pietro Gori - 2011 - Nietzsche Studien Gesamtregister Bände 1-20 40 (1):290-298.
    Hans Kleinpeter’s letters to Ernst Mach held in the Deutsches Museum Archive in Munich are of the greatest importance in order to learn some details of the relationship between these scholars. In the three letters here entirely published for the first time, Kleinpeter shows his interest for Nietzsche’s thought, and states that some of the latter’s ideas are in compliance with Mach’s epistemology.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31. The Turing Guide.Jack Copeland, Jonathan Bowen, Robin Wilson & Mark Sprevak (eds.) - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This volume celebrates the various facets of Alan Turing (1912–1954), the British mathematician and computing pioneer, widely considered as the father of computer science. It is aimed at the general reader, with additional notes and references for those who wish to explore the life and work of Turing more deeply. -/- The book is divided into eight parts, covering different aspects of Turing’s life and work. -/- Part I presents various biographical aspects of Turing, some from a personal point of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. Zur Bildung des Ausdrucks τὸ τί ἦν εἶναι durch Aristoteles.Erwin Sonderegger - 1983 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 65 (1):18-39.
    This article shows the origin of the famous Aristotelian expression τὸ τί ἦν εἶναι in everyday language. The expression is analysable in τὸ εἶναι and τί ἦν, and this part is the core of the common language question τουτὶ τί ἦν; or τουτὶ τί ἦν τὸ πρᾶγμα; always in imperfect form. This question is often found in Aristophanes’ comedies, which represent common Attic language. The imperfect ἦν is noted as a common Attic form indicating the present already by early comentators (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33. L'être Et le Néon, a Philosophical History of Neon Signs.Luis de Miranda (ed.) - 2012 - Max Milo.
    « Ce petit livre est un bijou d’intelligence, de finesse, de culture, qui prend un objet technique sans rechigner et le tourne et le retourne comme Heidegger nous avait appris à le faire avec les chaussures de Van Gogh. Ce qui frappe, c’est l’ambition d’une méditation sur les cartes de la modernité contemporaine, sur le fameux Grand Paris, sur le sujet, sur le pluriel, sans les faux-fuyants du postmoderne, de la citation absurde. Luis de Miranda se promène, il vous conte (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. How Many Kafka's Are There?Sonia Kamińska & Barry Smith - 2019 - Polish Journal of Aesthetics 53 (2):9-13.
    The aim of this volume is to present Kafka not as a writer, or not only as a writer, but as a philosopher. However, even after narrowing the scope of our interest down, there will still be several Kafka’s left on the table. Themes treated in the volume include: the so-called Brentano School in Prague, Kafka’s affiliation to the Louvre Circle, Kafka and existentialist philosophy, Kafka’s Jewish heritage, his love of Nietzsche and Meister Eckhart and—last but not least, since (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Biodiversity and Biocollections: Problem of Correspondence.Igor Pavlinov - 2016 - In Aspects of Biodiversity. KMK Sci Press. pp. 733-786.
    This text is an English translation of those several sections of the original paper in Russian, where collection-related issues are considered. The full citation of the original paper is as following: Pavlinov I.Ya. 2016. [Bioraznoobrazie i biokollektsii: problema sootvetstvia]. In: Pavlinov I.Ya. (comp.). Aspects of Biodiversity. Archives of Zoological Museum of Lomonosov Moscow State University, Vol. 54, Pр. 733–786. -/- Orientation of biology, as a natural science, on the study and explanation of the similarities and differences between organisms led (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Post-Modernism the New Classicism in Art and Architecture.Charles Jencks - 1987 - Rizzoli International Publications.
    Surveys post-modern architecture, shows and describes homes, museums, and office buildings, and discusses the post-modern movement in painting and sculpture.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  37. ‘But is It Art ?’ The Search for a Simple, Practical and Illuminating Answer.Jakob Zaaiman - 2016 - Alldaynight.Info.
    ‘Art’ still needs a practical, useful definition, not of the academic variety, but rather of the plain and simple sort that you can usefully take with you into a gallery, and apply directly to what you see. People want to know, with a basic clarity, what it is they are looking at, and how to judge the good from the bad. Because if you don’t know what ‘art’ is, and you think it’s all about ‘classical fine crafting’, then you are (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. The Ancient Quarrel Between Art and Philosophy in Contemporary Exhibitions of Visual Art.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2019 - Curator: The Museum Journal 62 (1):7-17.
    At a time when professional art criticism is on the wane, the ancient quarrel between art and philosophy demands fresh answers. Professional art criticism provided a basis upon which to distinguish apt experiences of art from the idiosyncratic. However, currently the kind of narratives from which critics once drew are underplayed or discarded in contemporary exhibition design where the visual arts are concerned. This leaves open the possibility that art operates either as mere stimulant to private reverie or, in the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. नेपाल : लोकतंत्र की स्थापना के लिये आन्दोलन.नेपाललोकतंत्र की स्थापना के लिये आन्दोलन - 2014 - SOCRATES 2 (1):234-242.
    The Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) won the largest number of seats in the Constituent Assembly election held on 10 April 2008, and formed a coalition government which included most of the parties in the CA. Although acts of violence occurred during the pre-electoral period, election observers noted that the elections themselves were markedly peaceful and "well-carried out". The newly elected Assembly met in Kathmandu on 28 May 2008, and, after a polling of 564 constituent Assembly members, 560 voted to (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  58
    Systematization Of Art Embroidery Patterns In Design Of Modern Dresses.Vakhidova Umida Abduhashimovna & Kayumova Dildora Zafar Qizi - 2019 - International Journal of Academic and Applied Research (IJAAR) 3 (4):21-25.
    Abstract: This article explores the stages of Uzbek artistic creation. Museum and written sources were considered traditional Uzbek embroidery types from antiquity to XIX century. Uzbek traditional embroidery patterns, symbolic meaning and usage have been systematized. New patterns and their use have been developed on the basis of traditional embroidery elements. The AutoCAD program has developed a new collection of modern costumes.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  49
    Holocaust Remembrance as Reparation for the Past: A Relational Egalitarian Approach.Adelin Dumitru - 2020 - In Holocaust Memoryscapes. Contemporary Memorialisation of the Holocaust in Central and Eastern European Countries. Bucharest: Editura Universitara. pp. 307-337.
    In the present chapter I try to determine to what extent the public policies adopted by Romanian governments following the fall of the communist regime contributed to alleviating the most egregious past injustice, the Holocaust. The measures taken for memorializing the Holocaust will be analysed through the lens of a mixed reparatory justice – relational egalitarian account. Employing such a framework entails a focus on symbolic reparations, meant to promote civic trust, social solidarity, and encourage the restoration of social and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. From Trust to Body. Artspace, Prestige, Sensitivity.Filippo Fimiani - 2017 - In Felice Masi & Maria Catena (eds.), The Changing Faces of Space. Cham, Switzerland: Springer Verlag. pp. 277-288.
    What happens to artist and to viewer when painting or sculpture emancipates itself from all physical mediums? What happens to art-world experts and to museum goers and amateurs when the piece of art turns immaterial, becoming indiscernible within its surrounding empty space and within the parergonal apparatus of the exposition site? What type of verbal depiction, of critical understanding and specific knowledge is attempted under these programmed and fabricated conditions? What kind of aesthetic experience–namely embodied and sensitive–is expected when (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Art and Cultural Heritage: An ASA Curriculum Diversification Guide.Erich Hatala Matthes - 2017 - American Society for Aesthetics, Curriculum Diversification Guides.
    Art is saturated with cultural significance. Considering the full spectrum of ways in which art is colored by cultural associations raises a variety of difficult and fascinating philosophical questions. This curriculum guide focuses in particular on questions that arise when we consider art as a form of cultural heritage. Organized into four modules, readings explore core questions about art and ethics, aesthetic value, museum practice, and art practice. They are designed to be suitable for use in an introduction to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  72
    The Toys of Organic Chemistry: Material Manipulatives and Inductive Reasoning.Kate McKinney Maddalena - 2013 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 35 (2):227-248.
    Chemical visualizations and models are special kinds of situated, inductive arguments. In this paper, I examine several historical case studies—an archive of images from museums, special collections, and popular magazines—as examples of emergent practices of physical modeling as theoretical play which became the basis for molecular biology and structural chemistry. Specifically, I trace a legacy of visualization tools that starts with Archibald Scott Cooper and Friedrich Kekulé in the late 1800s, crystallizes as material manipulatives in Kekulé’s student Jacobus Henricus Van’t (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Development of Sustainable Tourism Destinations and Poverty Alleviation of Bangladesh.Md Imran Sheikh - 2020 - International Journal of Scientific Research and Management (IJSRM) 8 (2).
    Tourism sector has been considered as the crucial sectors of many different countries of the world. And sustainable tourism brings enormous scope as a rapid growing economic sector on the basis of foreign exchange earnings and generation of employment opportunity and thereby elevating poverty from the country. The central aim of this study is to investigate the role of sustainable tourism in alleviating poverty from developing countries, especially the northern part of Bangladesh. For this purpose, the different tourism sites have (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  76
    Once Removed: The Nature of Representation.Tanya Kelley - manuscript
    James Prosek paints flora and fauna, but first became known for his paintings of trout. This essay situates Prosek's paintings, especially those at the Lowe Museum exhibit, within the long tradition of the depiction of nature. The essay comments on the relationship between the representation of nature and the nature of representation.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  57
    Building Narrative Identity: Episodic Value and its Identity-Forming Structure Within Personal and Social Contexts.Huiyuhl Yi - 2020 - Human Affairs 30 (2):281-292.
    In this essay, I develop the concept of episodic value, which describes a form of value connected to a particular object or individual expressed and delivered through a narrative. Narrative can bestow special kinds of value on objects, as exemplified by auction articles or museum collections. To clarify the nature of episodic value, I show how the notion of episodic value fundamentally differs from the traditional axiological picture. I extend my discussion of episodic value to argue that the notion (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  70
    Cultural Identity of Art Works.Curtis Carter, Disikate Ke, Min Yu & Chengji Liu - unknown
    Nelson Goodman (1906-2007) approached the arts and other kinds of knowledge as forms of symbolism. His principal aim in philosophy was to advance understanding and remove confusions by verbal analysis and logical constructions. Goodman's philosophical theories encompass nominalism, constructivism and a version of radical relativism. In his Languages of Art, Goodman sets forth distinctions among the various art according to differences in the forms of symbols employed. He contributed as well to arts education and to philosophy of the museum. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  50
    The Radiocarbon Dating of the Turin Shroud: New Evidence From Raw Data.Tristan Casabianca, Emanuela Marinelli, Giuseppe Pernagallo & Benedetto Torrisi - 2019 - Archaeometry 5 (61):1223-1231.
    In 1988, three laboratories performed a radiocarbon analysis of the Turin Shroud. The results, which were centralized by the British Museum and published in Nature in 1989, provided ‘conclusive evidence’ of the medieval origin of the artefact. However, the raw data were never released by the institutions. In 2017, in response to a legal request, all raw data kept by the British Museum were made accessible. A statistical analysis of the Nature article and the raw data strongly suggests (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  44
    Chapter 10: Preserving Authenticity in Virtual Heritage, Virtual Heritage: A Guide.Erik M. Champion - 2021 - London: Ubiquity Press.
    Virtual heritage has been explained as virtual reality applied to cultural heritage, but this definition only scratches the surface of the fascinating applications, tools and challenges of this fast-changing interdisciplinary field. This book provides an accessible but concise edited coverage of the main topics, tools and issues in virtual heritage. -/- Leading international scholars have provided chapters to explain current issues in accuracy and precision; challenges in adopting advanced animation techniques; shows how archaeological learning can be developed in Minecraft; they (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 66