Results for 'Rhythm'

81 found
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  1. Respiratory rhythms of the predictive mind.Micah Allen, Somogy Varga & Detlef H. Heck - 2022 - Psychological Review (4):1066-1080.
    Respiratory rhythms sustain biological life, governing the homeostatic exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. Until recently, however, the influence of breathing on the brain has largely been overlooked. Yet new evidence demonstrates that the act of breathing exerts a substantive, rhythmic influence on perception, emotion, and cognition, largely through the direct modulation of neural oscillations. Here, we synthesize these findings to motivate a new predictive coding model of respiratory brain coupling, in which breathing rhythmically modulates both local and global neural (...)
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  2. Rhythm and Signification: temporalities of musical and social meaning.Iain Campbell & Peter Nelson - 2022 - Angelaki 27 (5):56-78.
    Rhythm is generally taken to refer to a temporal pattern of events. Yet in recent years, across diverse fields in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, it has come to serve as the conceptual marker for a wide range of new approaches to understanding relations and relationality, following most explicitly from the late work of Henri Lefebvre. This article explores the temporal aspect of such relational thinking, in particular asking how time is implicated in relations, and how it can (...)
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  3. Pedagogical Rhythms: Practices and Reflections on Practices.Rebecca DeYoung - 2011 - In Smith James K. A. & Smith David (eds.), Teaching, Learning, and Christian Practice. Eerdmans.
    In this chapter, DeYoung looks at the concept of practices and goes on to argue why they are needed and how they can be useful. Beginning with the past traditions of practices and reflection on practices of the Desert Fathers and their followers, DeYoung takes the conversation to the classroom to discuss how such traditionally embedded practices can still be used. She emphasizes the cycle of doing practices and reflecting upon practices within the regular rhythm of the classroom.
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  4. Rhythm - International Lexicon of Aesthetics.Carlos Vara Sánchez - 2022 - International Lexicon of Aesthetics.
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  5. Sociology’s Rhythms: Temporal Dimensions of Knowledge Production.Filip Vostal - 2013 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 35 (4):499-524.
    From the temporal perspective, this article examines shifts in the productionof sociological knowledge. It identifies two kinds of rhythms of sociology: 1) that of sociological standpoints and techniques of investigation and 2) that of contemporary academic life and culture. The article begins by discussing some of the existing research strategies designed to "chase"high-speed society. Some, predominantly methodological, currents are explored and contrasted with the "slow" instruments of sociological analysis composed of different, yet complementary, modes of inquiry. Against this background, the (...)
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  6. Fulfilled present and rhythm of life.Roland Kipke - 2023 - Ethik in der Medizin 35 (1):23-42.
    Definition of the problem: The connection between time and the good life has already been worked out for a number of medical specialties and practices. However, what role does the temporality of the good life play for medicine as a whole? That is the central question of this article. Arguments: The good life is here understood as a meaningful life. Living meaningfully is only possible through present action. A fulfilled presence in this sense is therefore an essential aspect of the (...)
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  7. Avant-Gardes, Afrofuturism, and Philosophical Readings of Rhythm.Iain Campbell - 2019 - In Reynaldo Anderson & Clinton R. Fluker (eds.), The Black Speculative Arts Movement: Black Futurity, Art+Design. Lexington Books. pp. 27-49.
    Here I will put forward a claim about rhythm – that rhythm is relation. To develop this I will explore the entanglement of and antagonism between two notions of the musical avant-garde and its theorization. The first of these is derived from the European classical tradition, the second concerns Afrodiasporic musical practices. This essay comes in two parts. The first will consider some music-theoretical and philosophical ideas about rhythm in the post-classical avant-garde. Here I will explore how (...)
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  8. The Philosophical Significance of Wittgenstein’s Experiments on Rhythm, Cambridge 1912–13.Eran Guter - 2020 - Estetika: The European Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):28-43.
    Wittgenstein’s experiments on rhythm, conducted in Charles Myers’s laboratory in Cambridge during the years 1912–13, are his earliest recorded engagement in thinking about music, not just appreciating it, and philosophizing by means of musical thinking. In this essay, I set these experiments within their appropriate intellectual, scientific, and philosophical context in order to show that, its minor scientific importance notwithstanding, this onetime excursion into empirical research provided an early onset for Wittgenstein’s career-long exploration of the philosophically pervasive implications of (...)
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  9. Rhythm and Refrain: In Between Philosophy and Arts (2016).Jurate Baranova (ed.) - 2016 - Vilnius: Lithuanian University of educational sciences.
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  10. Difference as Rhythm and Thought as Subtractive Synthesis in Gilles Deleuze.Henrique Rocha de Souza Lima - 2019 - la Deleuziana – Online Journal of Philosophy 1 (10):79-94.
    This article discusses the place that the concept of rhythm occupies within Gilles Deleuze’s phi- losophy. I present a panorama of different ways to conceptualize thought throughout Deleuze’s writings from 1960’s to 1990’s, emphasizing the discussion about the threshold of thought. In the writings in partnership with Félix Guattari, Deleuze understand thought as an act of confronting chaos, what makes the problem of consistency a point of extreme relevance within his philosophical system. In this framework, the concept of thought (...)
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  11. Rhythm, Evolution and Neuroscience in Lullabies and Poetry.Dustin Hellberg - 2015 - Association for the Study of Ethical Behavior/Evolutionary Biology in Literature 11 (1).
    This paper will attempt a methodological configuration to link the natural sciences (evolutionary theory & neurology) to literature (lullabies and poetry, specifically). It uses findings in neuroscience and animal neurology as well as the theories of evolution by natural selection in to examine patterns in lullabies, and then connect these to poetry. As one will never find a ‘metaphor gene’, nor do genes even code for behaviors –coding instead for traits- is it possible to even locate overlaps between the disciplines (...)
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  12. The Philosopher's Bass Drum: Adorno's Jazz and the Politics of Rhythm.Maya Kronfeld - 2019 - Radical Philosophy 2 (5):34-47.
    The philosophical significance of rhythm in the United States has been undermined from both sides of what Adorno and Horkheimer called the ‘dialectic of enlightenment’. When rhythm has not been falsely exalted, promising a fetishised, racialised ‘return’ to the body, it has been devalued through the tainted associations of rhythmic synchronisation with fascist regimes and the demand for compliance. In this article, I engage these issues as they inflect the politics of musical form. Adorno’s notorious critique of jazz (...)
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  13.  67
    Strong Circadian Rhythms in the Choroid Plexus: Implications for Sleep-Independent Brain Metabolite Clearance.Timothy Joseph Lane - 2018 - Journal of Experimental Neuroscience 12.
    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a fluidic part of the brain’s microenvironment that isolates the brain from the rest of the body. CSF dilutes metabolites from neuronal activities and removes them from the brain. Its production and resorption are regulated dynamically and are central to maintaining brain homeostasis. We discovered that the major CSF source, the choroid plexus (CP), harbors the brain’s strongest circadian clock. Here, we consider some implications of the CP circadian clock for metabolite clearance in the brain. If (...)
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  14. Kjærlighetens rytme - Philosophia og pedagogiske relasjoner (The Rhythm of love - Philosophia and educational relations).Inga Bostad - 2022 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 57 (3-4):160-168.
    This article presents and argues for love as part of philosophy of education, more specifically the pedagogical relationship. In light of the concept of an ethics of rhythm, inspired by Roland Barthes, it is argued that the concept of rhythms sheds critical light on the asymmetrical and oppressive potential of the pedagogical relationship, but also on the liberating one. Furthermore, this argument is put into a broader debate about the role of academia as hospitable, inviting and inclusive, which in (...)
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  15. The Ghosts I Do Know: Rhythm, Dickinson, Crane.Dustin Hellberg - 2014 - Consciousness, Literature and the Arts 15 (3).
    This paper will examine poetry and rhythm in relation to biological and evolutionary models in order to develop a hypothetical methodology by which certain aspects of literature may be examined through an evolutionary lens. It is by no means an attempt at a finalizing or totalizing way of examining literature, but as such attempts have largely been ignored or assaulted, there is a rather large niche to fill. Hence this article will attempt to redefine literature as a ‘Third Level (...)
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  16.  90
    Review of Pascal Michon, Rhythmes, Pouvoir, Mondialisation. [REVIEW]Meili Steele - 2006 - Comparative Literature 58:170-172.
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  17. Two Concepts of Groove: Musical Nuances, Rhythm, and Genre.Evan Malone - 2022 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 80 (3):345-354.
    Groove, as a musical quality, is an important part of jazz and pop music appreciative practices. Groove talk is widespread among musicians and audiences, and considerable importance is placed on generating and appreciating grooves in music. However, musicians, musicologists, and audiences use groove attributions in a variety of ways that do not track one consistent underlying concept. I argue that that there are at least two distinct concepts of groove. On one account, groove is ‘the feel of the music’ and, (...)
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  18. Perry Link: An Anatomy of Chinese; Rhythm, Metaphor. Harvard University Press 2013. [REVIEW]Christian Helmut Wenzel - 2014 - Etudes Chinoises 33 (1):174-181.
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  19. Christina Rossetti’s “Pros and Cons” versus Middlemarch: rhythm and anti-racism.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    Christina Rossetti’s short fiction has been long-neglected, we are told. In this paper, I respond to her fiction “Pros and Cons,” which perhaps provides a clue regarding why there has been neglect: it leaves the impression of being an imitation of George Eliot, a mocking imitation even. I identify two differences between Rossetti and Eliot.
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  20. Wittgenstein in the Laboratory: Pre-Tractatus Seeds of Wittgenstein’s Post-Tractatus Aesthetics.Eran Guter - 2023 - International Wittgenstein Symposium 2023: 100 Years of Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus — 70 Years After Wittgenstein’s Death. A Critical Assessment.
    Wittgenstein’s experiments on rhythm (1912-13) were based on Charles Myers’s 1911 written protocols for laboratory exercises. The experiments provided an early onset for Wittgenstein’s career-long exploration of the philosophically pervasive implications of aspects. Years before the Tractatus, Wittgenstein already got a glimpse of a philosophical angle, which was bound to become very important to him not only in aesthetics, but also for his overarching philosophical development. He became interested in the possibilities of aesthetic conversation, in what we actually do (...)
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  21. A 2-dimensional geometry for biological time.Francis Bailly, Giuseppe Longo & Maël Montévil - 2011 - Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 106:474 - 484.
    This paper proposes an abstract mathematical frame for describing some features of biological time. The key point is that usual physical (linear) representation of time is insufficient, in our view, for the understanding key phenomena of life, such as rhythms, both physical (circadian, seasonal …) and properly biological (heart beating, respiration, metabolic …). In particular, the role of biological rhythms do not seem to have any counterpart in mathematical formalization of physical clocks, which are based on frequencies along the usual (...)
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  22.  58
    The Meaning of Music in Hegel.Jeffrey Reid - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophical Research.
    I begin by defending Heinrich Gustav Hotho’s foundational edition of the Lectures on Aesthetics (LA) contra Gethmann-Siebert and others who argue for a non-systematic view of Hegel’s aesthetics generally and music specifically. I defend Hegel against the common conceit that his comprehension of music was somehow deficient and introduce the Hegelian idea of absolute agency as performative in art and music. Reference to Kant’s transcendental aesthetics then allows us to grasp how, in Hegel, meaningful tones arise from the vibratory oscillation (...)
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  23. Sonic Booms in Blanchot.David Appelbaum - 2018 - Angelaki 23 (3):144-157.
    Blanchot’s rejection of vision as the fundamental philosophical metaphor is well known: “Seeing is not speaking” (The Infinite Conversation (Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 1993) 25). Furthermore, his central idea of the limit-experience (borrowed from Bataille) is a “detour from everything visible and invisible” (210). As part of his Heideggerian heritage, the increased importance of hearing (and aurality in general) lacks the critical appraisal it deserves. Pari passu for voice. Blanchot’s investigation of voice, spoken, interior, literary, is extensive. Various works (...)
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  24. Aldatıcı Taklitçi Şiir Bağlamında Büyünün Mekaniği.İhsan Gürsoy - 2023 - Theosophia (6):1-17.
    [The Mechanics of Sorcery in the Context of Deceptive-Imitative Poetry] When we inquire as to how people could have a perverted preference for ignorance over knowledge, Plato’s statement that people are deprived of true opinions only against their will provides us with an essential clue for starting out: Depriving a person of something against their will is only possible by theft, by spells of sorcery, or by force. Victims of sorcery alter their opinions under the spell of pleasure or are (...)
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  25. Beyond the ‘Last Phenomenology’: Rhythmic Modulations in Gilles Deleuze’s The Logic of Sensation.Iain Campbell - 2023 - Deleuze and Guattari Studies 17 (3):301-325.
    This article reconstructs Gilles Deleuze’s engagement with phenomenology, and with the phenomenological problematic of sensation, in his Francis Bacon: The Logic of Sensation. Considering Deleuze’s adoption, from the phenomenology of art, of notions of sensation and rhythm, it examines how Deleuze complexifies these phenomenological notions by aligning them with his profoundly non-phenomenological notion of the body without organs, as well as with the concepts of modulation and the diagram. In mapping Deleuze’s complexification of rhythm and his development of (...)
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  26. Deleuze and Guattari’s Semiorhythmology: A Sketch for a Rhythmic Theory of Signs.Iain Campbell - 2019 - la Deleuziana 10:351-370.
    I propose in this text a rhythmic theory of signs drawn from the thought of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. I name this theory a semiorhythmology. I suggest that the theory of rhythm developed in A Thousand Plateaus (1980) can be understood, in part, as the culmination of the diverse set of inquiries into signs that both Deleuze and Guattari undertook, individually and together, beginning in the 1960s. I first outline Deleuze’s theory of signs as a theory of encounter (...)
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  27.  70
    Arystoksenos z Tarentu, Elementy rymtu.Anna Maria Laskowska - 2016 - Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 61:347-356.
    Aristoxenus's "Elements of Rhythm" stands as the earliest extant scientific treatise on rhythm, with only the second book enduring to our present day, albeit in an incomplete state. Demonstrating his allegiance to Aristotle, Aristoxenus employs Aristotelian concepts and investigative methods throughout his work. Notably, he introduces a conceptual division between the substance of rhythm (rhythmizomenon) and its rhythmic structure (rhythmos). Drawing parallels to Aristotle's temporal theory, Aristoxenus goes further by proposing a novel concept—the "protos chronos," denoting the (...)
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  28. Evaluating emotions in medical practice: a critical examination of ‘clinical detachment’ and emotional attunement in orthopaedic surgery.Helene Scott-Fordsmand - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (3):413-428.
    In this article I propose to reframe debates about ideals of emotion in medicine, abandoning the current binary setup of this debate as one between ‘clinical detachment’ and empathy. Inspired by observations from my own field work and drawing on Sky Gross’ anthropological work on rituals of practice as well as Henri Lefebvre’s notion of rhythm, I propose that the normative drive of clinical practice can be better understood through the notion of attunement. In this framework individual types of (...)
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  29. How Museums Make Us Feel: Affective Niche Construction and the Museum of Non-Objective Painting.Jussi A. Saarinen - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (4):543-558.
    Art museums are built to elicit a wide variety of feelings, emotions, and moods from their visitors. While these effects are primarily achieved through the artworks on display, museums commonly deploy numerous other affect-inducing resources as well, including architectural solutions, audio guides, lighting fixtures, and informational texts. Art museums can thus be regarded as spaces that are designed to influence affective experiencing through multiple structures and mechanisms. At face value, this may seem like a somewhat self-evident and trivial statement to (...)
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  30. The memory of another past: Bergson, Deleuze and a new theory of time.Alia Al-Saji - 2004 - Continental Philosophy Review 37 (2):203-239.
    Through the philosophies of Bergson and Deleuze, my paper explores a different theory of time. I reconstitute Deleuze’s paradoxes of the past in Difference and Repetition and Bergsonism to reveal a theory of time in which the relation between past and present is one of coexistence rather than succession. The theory of memory implied here is a non-representational one. To elaborate this theory, I ask: what is the role of the “virtual image” in Bergson’s Matter and Memory? Far from representing (...)
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  31. Predictive Processing and the Phenomenology of Time Consciousness: A Hierarchical Extension of Rick Grush’s Trajectory Estimation Model.Wanja Wiese - 2017 - Philosophy and Predictive Processing.
    This chapter explores to what extent some core ideas of predictive processing can be applied to the phenomenology of time consciousness. The focus is on the experienced continuity of consciously perceived, temporally extended phenomena (such as enduring processes and successions of events). The main claim is that the hierarchy of representations posited by hierarchical predictive processing models can contribute to a deepened understanding of the continuity of consciousness. Computationally, such models show that sequences of events can be represented as states (...)
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  32.  99
    La vitesse Stridentisme.Salvador Gallardo Cabrera - 2023 - Attaques 5 (5):712-727. Translated by Florence Malfatto.
    The historical avant-gardes showed that it is in the syntactic space where the mutations of art occur, where the creative potentialities in contemporary art are played. Hence the need to accentuate the syntactic creation registers in the works of the Estridentistas. There is no creation of images, rhythms, words, atmospheres, sound orientations, planes or political-literary postures that are valid apart from the syntax effects in which the poems of Manuel Maples Arce, Germán List, Salvador Gallardo and Kyn-Taniya take place, the (...)
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  33. Preserving without conserving: memoryscopes and historically burdened heritage.John Sutton - 2022 - Adaptive Behavior 30 (6):555-559.
    Rather than conserving or ignoring historically burdened heritage, RAAAF intervene. Their responses are striking, sometimes dramatic or destructive. Prompted by Rietveld’s discussion of the Luftschloss project, I compare some other places with difficult pasts which engage our embodied and sensory responses, without such active redirection or disruption. Ross Gibson’s concept of a ‘memoryscope’ helps us identify distinct but complementary ways of focussing the forces of the past. Emotions and imaginings are transmitted over time in many forms. The past is not (...)
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  34. Making Sense of Sensory Input.Richard Evans, José Hernández-Orallo, Johannes Welbl, Pushmeet Kohli & Marek Sergot - 2021 - Artificial Intelligence 293 (C):103438.
    This paper attempts to answer a central question in unsupervised learning: what does it mean to “make sense” of a sensory sequence? In our formalization, making sense involves constructing a symbolic causal theory that both explains the sensory sequence and also satisfies a set of unity conditions. The unity conditions insist that the constituents of the causal theory – objects, properties, and laws – must be integrated into a coherent whole. On our account, making sense of sensory input is a (...)
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  35. "A past which has never been present": Bergsonian dimensions in Merleau-ponty's theory of the prepersonal.Alia Al-Saji - 2008 - Research in Phenomenology 38 (1):41-71.
    Merleau-Ponty's reference to "a past which has never been present" at the end of "Le sentir" challenges the typical framework of the Phenomenology of Perception, with its primacy of perception and bodily field of presence. In light of this "original past," I propose a re-reading of the prepersonal as ground of perception that precedes the dichotomies of subject-object and activity-passivity. Merleau-Ponty searches in the Phenomenology for language to describe this ground, borrowing from multiple registers (notably Bergson, but also Husserl). This (...)
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  36. The Sense of Time.Gerardo Viera - 2020 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 71 (2):443-469.
    It’s often claimed in the philosophical and scientific literature on temporal representation that there is no such thing as a genuine sensory system for time. In this paper, I argue for the opposite—many animals, including all mammals, possess a genuine sensory system for time based in the circadian system. In arguing for this conclusion, I develop a semantics and meta-semantics for explaining how the endogenous rhythms of the circadian system provide organisms with a direct information link to the temporal structure (...)
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  37. Harmonia, Melos and Rhytmos. Aristotle on Musical Education.Elena Cagnoli Fiecconi - 2016 - Ancient Philosophy 36 (2):409-424.
    In this paper, I reconstruct the reasons why Aristotle thinks that musical education is important for moral education. Musical education teaches us to enjoy appropriately and to recognize perceptually fine melodies and rhythms. Fine melodies and rhythms are similar to the kind of movements fine actions consist in and fine characters display. By teaching us to enjoy and recognise fine melodies and rhythms, musical education can train us to recognize and to take pleasure in fine actions and characters. Thus, musical (...)
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  38.  87
    Reimagining Digital Well-Being. Report for Designers & Policymakers.Daan Annemans, Matthew Dennis, , Gunter Bombaerts, Lily E. Frank, Tom Hannes, Laura Moradbakhti, Anna Puzio, Lyanne Uhlhorn, Titiksha Vashist, , Anastasia Dedyukhina, Ellen Gilbert, Iliana Grosse-Buening & Kenneth Schlenker - 2024 - Report for Designers and Policymakers.
    This report aims to offer insights into cutting-edge research on digital well-being. Many of these insights come from a 2-day academic-impact event, The Future of Digital Well-Being, hosted by a team of researchers working with the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) in February 2024. Today, achieving and maintaining well-being in the face of online technologies is a multifaceted challenge that we believe requires using theoretical resources of different research disciplines. This report explores diverse perspectives on how digital (...)
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  39. Moving Stories: Agency, Emotion and Practical Rationality.Dave Ward - 2019 - In Laura Candiotto (ed.), The Value of Emotions for Knowledge. Springer Verlag. pp. 145-176.
    What is it to be an agent? One influential line of thought, endorsed by G. E. M. Anscombe and David Velleman, among others, holds that agency depends on practical rationality—the ability to act for reasons, rather than being merely moved by causes. Over the past 25 years, Velleman has argued compellingly for a distinctive view of agency and the practical rationality with which he associates it. On Velleman’s conception, being an agent consists in having the capacity to be motivated by (...)
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  40. Scientific, Poetic, and Philosophical Clarity.James Camien McGuiggan - 2022 - Metaphilosophy 53:605–22.
    What is it to be clear? And will that question have the same answer in science, poetry, and philosophy? This paper offers a taxonomy of clarity, before focusing on two notions that are pertinent to the notions of clarity in science, poetry, and, in particular, philosophy. It argues that “scientific clarity,” which is marked by its reliance on technical terms, is, though often appropriate, not the only way in which something can be clear. In particular, poetry entirely eschews technical terms—but (...)
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  41. Framing Emotional Perception: Affect and Effect of Aesthetic Experience, or Extensions of Aesthetic Theory Towards Semiotics.Martina Sauer - 2019 - Art Style: Art and Culture International Magazine 4 (4):73-87.
    How does an audience receive a work of art? Does the experience only affect the viewer or does it have an effect and thus influence his or her actions? It is the cultural philosopher Ernst Cassirer and his successors in philosophy and developmental psychology as well as in neuroscience to this day who postulate that perception in general and perception of art in particular are not neutral in their origins but alive and thus meaningful. They assume that both are based (...)
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  42. Brak czy wszechobecność artykulacji w Ingardenowskiej teorii budowy dzieła muzycznego?Andrzej Krawiec - 2020 - Przeglad Filozoficzny - Nowa Seria 29 (4):473-485.
    In 'The Work of Music and the Problem of Its Identity' by Roman Ingarden we are presented with a philosophical theory of the structure of the musical work. The author includes melody, rhythm and harmony among the primary elements of the musical work while dynamics, tempo and colouration (sonoristics) are classified as its secondary elements. The elements designated by the score constitute a schematic prescription for creating a particular work. Still, the scheme also includes numerous gaps and indeterminacies which (...)
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  43. The Shadow of God in the Garden of the Philosopher. The Parc de La Villette in Paris in the context of philosophy of chôra. Part III.Cezary Wąs - 2019 - Quart. Kwartalnik Instytutu Historii Sztuki Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego 2 (52):89-119.
    Tschumi believes that the quality of architecture depends on the theoretical factor it contains. Such a view led to the creation of architecture that would achieve visibility and comprehensibility only after its interpretation. On his way to creating such an architecture he took on a purely philosophical reflection on the basic building block of architecture, which is space. In 1975, he wrote an essay entitled Questions of Space, in which he included several dozen questions about the nature of space. The (...)
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  44. Tackling the Corona pandemic: Managing nonknowledge in political decision-making.Jaana Parviainen, Anne Koski & Paula Alanen - 2022 - In Matthias Gross & Linsey McGoey (eds.), Routledge International Handbook of Ignorance Studies (2nd edition). Routledge. pp. 211–220.
    During the corona pandemic, politicians have been forced to make urgent decisions under pressure while balancing between challenging options: protecting citizens’ health or causing major social and economic difficulties through security measures. Part of the dilemma has been whether the chosen security measures are oversized, causing fundamental economic and social problems, or not sufficiently enough, thus putting people’s lives at risk. In illustrating our discussion with actions taken by press conferences (PCs) of the Finnish Government, we discuss how nonknowing has (...)
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  45. Spatial music.John Dyck - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):279-292.
    Everyone agrees that musical works are individuated by essential elements such as tone, harmony, and rhythm. Some argue that timbre or instrumentation can individuate musical works, too. I argue here that there can be a further element of musical works: spatial location. Some works of music are partly constituted by the location and motion of their sound sources. I begin by describing works of spatial music and arguing that they exist. I then consider the implications for the ontology of (...)
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  46. Gadamer – Cheng: Conversations in Hermeneutics.Andrew Fuyarchuk - 2021 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 48 (3):245-249.
    1 Introduction1 In the 1980s, hermeneutics was often incorporated into deconstructionism and literary theory. Rather than focus on authorial intentions, the nature of writing itself including codes used to construct meaning, socio-economic contexts and inequalities of power,2 Gadamer introduced a different perspective; the interplay between effects of history on a reader’s understanding and the tradition(s) handed down in writing. This interplay in which a reader’s prejudices are called into question and modified by the text in a fusion of understanding and (...)
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  47. Eden Inverted: On the Wild Self and the Contraction of Consciousness.Eugene Halton - 2007 - The Trumpeter 3 (23):45-77.
    The conditions of hunting and gathering through which one line of primates evolved into humans form the basis of what I term the wild self, a self marked by developmental needs of prolonged human neoteny and by deep attunement to the profusion of communicative signs of instinctive intelligence in which relatively “unmatured” hominids found themselves immersed. The passionate attunement to, and inquiry into, earth-drama, in tracking, hunting, foraging, rhythming, singing, and other arts/sciences, provided the trail to becoming human, and provide (...)
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  48. Why study movement variability in autism?Maria Brincker & Elizabeth Torres - 2017 - In Torres Elizabeth & Whyatt Caroline (eds.), Autism the movement-sensing approach. CRC Press - Taylor & Francis Group.
    Autism has been defined as a disorder of social cognition, interaction and communication where ritualistic, repetitive behaviors are commonly observed. But how should we understand the behavioral and cognitive differences that have been the main focus of so much autism research? Can high-level cognitive processes and behaviors be identified as the core issues people with autism face, or do these characteristics perhaps often rather reflect individual attempts to cope with underlying physiological issues? Much research presented in this volume will point (...)
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  49. Thinking with Susanne Langer: Sonar Entanglements with the Non-human.Lona Gaikis - 2021 - Open Philosophy 4 (1):149-161.
    An aesthetic and epistemological departure from ocular centrism has occurred in the wake of current technological evolutions and the posthuman turn. The sonic exploration of the more-than-human takes artists and philosophers beyond anthropomorphism to reveal the hidden patterning of life forms and yet-unfathomed universes. The conflation of nature with culture is one shift that takes place when thinking with sounds and rhythm and studying our environments. On an ontological level, a reordering of subject and object occurs when encountering the (...)
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  50. The Cognitive Gap, Neural Darwinism & Linguistic Dualism —Russell, Husserl, Heidegger & Quine.Hermann G. W. Burchard - 2014 - Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):244-264.
    Guided by key insights of the four great philosophers mentioned in the title, here, in review of and expanding on our earlier work (Burchard, 2005, 2011), we present an exposition of the role played by language, & in the broader sense, λογοζ, the Logos, in how the CNS, the brain, is running the human being. Evolution by neural Darwinism has been forcing the linguistic nature of mind, enabling it to overcome & exploit the cognitive gap between an animal and its (...)
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