Results for 'Timaeus'

43 found
Order:
  1.  97
    A Time for Learning and for Counting – Egyptians, Greeks and Empirical Processes in Plato’s Timaeus.Barbara M. Sattler - 2010 - In Richard Mohr & Barbara M. Sattler (eds.), One Book, the Whole Universe: Plato’s Timaeus Today. Parmenides Press. pp. 249-266.
    This paper argues that processes in the sensible realm can be in accord with reason in the Timaeus, since rationality is understood here as being based on regularity, which is conferred onto processes by time. Plato uses two different temporal structures in the Timaeus, associated with the contrast there drawn between Greek and Egyptian approaches to history. The linear order of before and after marks natural processes as rational and underlies the Greek treatment of history. By contrast, a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Receptacle/ Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus.Emanuela Bianchi - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3.  34
    Timaeus on Color Mixture.Mark Eli Kalderon - manuscript
    This talk consists in a trick and a potential insight. The trick consists in a minimalist interpretation of color mixture. The account of color mixture is minimalist in the sense that, given certain background assumptions, there is no more to Timaeus’ account of color mixture than the list of the chromatic pathēmata and the list of how these combine to elicit perceptions of all the colors. The only potential controversial elements of the minimalist interpretation are the relevant background assumptions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Timaeus 48e-52d and the Third Man Argument.William J. Prior - 1983 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 9:123-147.
    In this article I argue that "Timaeus" 48e-52d, the passage in which Plato introduces the receptacle into his ontology, Contains the material for a satisfactory response to the third man argument. Plato's use of "this" and "such" to distinguish the receptacle, Becoming, And the forms clarifies the nature of his ontology and indicates that the forms are not, In general, self-predicative. This result removes one argument against regarding the "Timaeus" as a late dialogue.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Proclus: Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus, Part III – Proclus on the World’s Body. A Translation with Notes and Introduction,.Dirk Baltzly - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the present volume Proclus comments on the creation of the body of the universe in Plato's Timaeus.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  77
    In the Eye of the Cognitive Storm, Timaeus on Sense and Sensibilia.Mark Eli Kalderon - manuscript
    This is an essay on perfection and its objects in the Timaeus. Two features of this work are noteworthy. First, the emphasis throughout is on Timaeus' views and not Plato's. Second, I show how broader aspects of Timaeus' cosmology are directly relevant to his philosophy of perception.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. The Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato's Timaeus.Josh Wilburn - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):627-652.
    in the tripartite psychology of the Republic, Plato characterizes the “spirited” part of the soul as the “ally of reason”: like the auxiliaries of the just city, whose distinctive job is to support the policies and judgments passed down by the rulers, spirit’s distinctive “job” in the soul is to support and defend the practical decisions and commands of the reasoning part. This is to include not only defense against external enemies who might interfere with those commands, but also, and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8. The Timaeus and the Longer Way.Mitchell Miller - 2003 - In Gretchen Reydams-Schils (ed.), Plato's Timaeus as Cultural Icon. University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 17-59.
    A study of the significance of Plato's resumption of the simile of model and likeness in the Timaeus, with attention to the place of the Timaeus in the "longer way" that Plato has Socrates announce in the Republic. The reader embarked on the "longer way," I argue, will find in the accounts of the elements and of the kinds of animals unannounced but detailed exhibitions of the "god-given" method of dialectic that Plato has Socrates announce in the Philebus.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. Proclus: Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus, Part IV – Proclus on the World Soul. A Translation with Notes and Introduction.Dirk Baltzly - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the present volume Proclus describes the 'creation' of the soul that animates the entire universe. This is not a literal creation, for Proclus argues that Plato means only to convey the eternal dependence of the World Soul upon higher causes. In his exegesis of Plato's text, Proclus addresses a range of issues in Pythagorean harmonic theory, as well as questions about the way in which the World Soul knows both forms and the visible reality that comprises its body. This (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Przemowa Demiurga W Platońskim „Timajosie” a Współczesne Pojęcie Godności [Demiurge’s Speech in Plato’s “Timaeus” and the Contemporary Concept of Dignity].Marek Piechowiak - 2013 - In Antoni Dębiński (ed.), Abiit, non obiit. Księga poświęcona pamięci Księdza Profesora Antoniego Kościa SVD. Wydawnictwo KUL. pp. 655-665.
    Today, dignity recognized as a fundamental value across legal systems is equal, inherent and inalienable, inviolable, is the source of human rights and is essential for its subject to be recognized as an autotelic entity (an end in itself) that cannot be treated as an object. The analysis of the extract from Plato’s Demiurge’s speech in Timaeus reveals that Plato developed a reflection on something that determines the qualitative difference between certain beings and the world of things, and that (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  75
    Wear The Teachings of Syrianus on Plato's Timaeus and Parmenides. Pp. Xiv + 353. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2011. Cased, €108, US$153. ISBN: 978-90-04-19290-4. [REVIEW]Eugene V. Afonasin - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):103-105.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  31
    The Sui Generis Problem in Plato's Timaeus.Michael Lucana - 2015 - Dissertation, San Francisco State University
    In the Timaeus, Plato tells the story of a divine craftsman who, using the world of intelligibles as a model, produces a living and orderly universe from the pre-existing physical elements. The Demiurge in the cosmological narrative has at various times been identified by interpreters of Plato with the model, the product, or even simultaneously both. I intend to argue that there is a strong basis for Plato’s cosmology to be structurally triadic, that is, between a distinct model, cause, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  88
    Plato's Theology in the Timaeus 29e-30a.Panagiotis Pavlos - 2014 - ΑΚΑΔΗΜΕΙΑ: Researches on Platonism History 9:49-58.
    In this paper the Platonic concepts of Goodness, Belief and Will as they appear in the passage 29d–30a of the Timeaus, are examined . The main intention is, through this examination, to explore whether –and, if yes, why- these notions constitute essential elements of Plato’s theology.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Aspects of Plato's Political Thinking in the Timaeus and the 10th Book of Laws.Panagiotis Pavlos - 2013 - In Alexey V. Tsyb (ed.), ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΠΟΛΙΣ: Philosophy of Antiquity as an interdisciplinary synthesis of philosophical, historical and philological studies. Sociological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg's Plato Society. pp. 40-44.
    Short communication published in the Proceedings of the International Summer School for Young Researchers Platwnopolis, in St. Petersburg, Russia, 2012.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  30
    A Platonic Trope Bundle Theory.Christopher Buckels - forthcoming - Ancient Philosophy Today.
    This paper provides a rational reconstruction of a Platonic trope bundle theory that is a live alternative to contemporary bundle theories. According to the theory, Platonic particulars are composed of what Plato calls images of Forms; contemporary metaphysicians call these tropes. Tropes are dependent on Forms and the Receptacle, while trope bundles are structured by natural kinds using the Phaedo’s principles of inclusion and exclusion and the Timaeus’ geometrized elements, as well as by co-location in the Receptacle. Key elements (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. La metafísica de Platón según san Alberto Magno.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2015 - In Oscar Mauricio Donato (ed.), En torno a Platón. Universidad Libre de Colombia. pp. 17-64.
    Although St. Albert the Great is known for his assimilation of Aristotle’s thought, he holds Plato in high regard. Yet Aristotle largely guides Albert’s understanding of Plato and Aristotelian criticism against him is repeated along Albert’s work. The objections raised in the first book of the Metaphysics are especially recurrent. Therefore to study Albert’s commentary on such objections in some detail, as we do in these pages, has considerable interest. Criticism against Plato focuses on his conception of the universal and (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Moral Education and the Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato's Laws.Joshua Wilburn - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 45:63.
    In this paper I argue that although the Republic’s tripartite theory of the soul is not explicitly endorsed in Plato’s late work the Laws, it continues to inform the Laws from beneath the surface of the text. In particular, I argue that the spirited part of the soul continues to play a major role in moral education and development in the Laws (as it did in earlier texts, where it is characterized as reason’s psychic ‘ally’). I examine the programs of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18.  58
    Triangles, Tropes, and Τὰ Τοιαʋ ̃τα: A Platonic Trope Theory.Christopher Buckels - 2018 - Plato Journal: The Journal of the International Plato Society 18:9-24.
    A standard interpretation of Plato’s metaphysics holds that sensible particulars are images of Forms. Such particulars are fairly independent, like Aristotelian substances. I argue that this is incorrect: Platonic particulars are not Form images but aggregates of Form images, which are property-instances. Timaeus 49e-50a focuses on “this-suches” and even goes so far as to claim that they compose other things. I argue that Form images are this-suches, which are tropes. I also examine the geometrical account, showing that the geometrical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  65
    Aristotle’s Critique of Timaean Psychology.Jason W. Carter - 2017 - Rhizomata 5 (1):51-78.
    Of all the criticisms that Aristotle gives of his predecessors’ theories of soul in De anima I.3–5, none seems more unmotivated than the ones directed against the world soul of Plato’s Timaeus. Against the current scholarly consensus, I claim that the status of Aristotle’s criticisms is philosophical rather than eristical, and that they provide important philosophical reasons, independent of Phys. VIII.10 and Metaph. Λ.6, for believing that νοῦς is without spatial extension, and that its thinking is not a physical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  63
    Plato’s Recollection Argument in the Philebus.Naoya Iwata - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (2):189-212.
    Many scholars have denied that Plato’s argument about desire at Philebus 34c10–35d7 is related to his recollection arguments in the Meno and Phaedo, because it is concerned only with postnatal experiences of pleasure. This paper argues against their denial by showing that the desire argument in question is intended to prove the soul’s possession of innate memory of pleasure. This innateness interpretation will be supported by a close analysis of the Timaeus, where Plato suggests that our inborn desires for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. A Likely Account of Necessity: Plato's Receptacle as a Physical and Metaphysical Foundation for Space.Barbara Sattler - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):159-195.
    This paper aims to show that—and how—Plato’s notion of the receptacle in the Timaeus provides the conditions for developing a mathematical as well as a physical space without itself being space. In response to the debate whether Plato’s receptacle is a conception of space or of matter, I suggest employing criteria from topology and the theory of metric spaces as the most basic ones available. I show that the receptacle fulfils its main task–allowing the elements qua images of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  66
    Making Room for Particulars: Plato’s Receptacle as Space, Not Substratum.Christopher Buckels - 2016 - Apeiron 49 (3):303-328.
    The ‘traditional’ interpretation of the Receptacle in Plato’s Timaeus maintains that its parts act as substrata to ordinary particulars such as dogs and tables: particulars are form-matter compounds to which Forms supply properties and the Receptacle supplies a substratum, as well as a space in which these compounds come to be. I argue, against this view, that parts of the Receptacle cannot act as substrata for those particulars. I also argue, making use of contemporary discussions of supersubstantivalism, against a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Platons Timaios Und Kants Übergangsschrift (2015). Sonderegger (ed.) - 2015 - Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann.
    Following the structuring hints given by Plato in his Timaeus} you find, that the dialogue – actually Timaeus' lecture – falls in two parts, not in three as Cornford, Brisson and others suggest. The main division follows the two invocations of the gods (27c, 48d). The first part presents the world in its noetic form, poetically described as the work of the demiurg. Timaeus opens this part giving first his premises in the form of an introduction, which (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Όψεις της Πολιτικής Σκέψης του Πλάτωνα στον Τίμαιο και τους Νόμους.Panagiotis G. Pavlos - 2012 - IKEE / Aristotle University of Thessaloniki - Library.
    Is there any relation between Plato’s political thinking and his cosmology – physical theory? If there is, how can it be outlined? Does the natural world constitute for Plato a leader thread, so that he can give shape to his ideal Republic (Politeia)? Which are the ratios that are shown? In which way does Plato derive ideas to form his political theory, through nature? Is the platonic state too much of an ideal to be considered utopian not only from philosophy (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  27
    Учение Прокла О Надкосмических Душах.Svetlana Mesyats - 2018 - Schole 12 (2):599-631.
    According to Marinus of Samaria, Proclus was the author of many philosophical doctrines. In particular he was the first to assert the existence of a kind of souls that are capable of simultaneously seeing several ideas and situated between the divine Intellect which embraces all things together by a single intuition, and the souls whose thoughts pass from one idea to another. In the following we are going to answer the question, what kind of souls did Proclus discover and why (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Creation and Divine Providence in Plotinus.Christopher Noble & Nathan Powers - 2015 - In Anna Marmodoro & Brian Prince (eds.), Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity. pp. 51-70.
    In this paper, we argue that Plotinus denies deliberative forethought about the physical cosmos to the demiurge on the basis of certain basic and widely shared Platonic and Aristotelian assumptions about the character of divine thought. We then discuss how Plotinus can nonetheless maintain that the cosmos is «providentially» ordered.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  27. On the Use of Stoicheion in the Sense of 'Element'.Timothy J. Crowley - 2005 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 29:367-394.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  28. Optimality and Teleology in Aristotle's Natural Science.Devin Henry - manuscript
    In this paper I examine the role of optimality reasoning in Aristotle’s natural science. By “optimality reasoning” I mean reasoning that appeals to some conception of “what is best” in order to explain why things are the way they are. We are first introduced to this pattern of reasoning in the famous passage at Phaedo 97b8-98a2, where (Plato’s) Socrates invokes “what is best” as a cause (aitia) of things in nature. This passage can be seen as the intellectual ancestor of (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  29. Plato's Theory of Recollection.Norman Gulley - 1954 - Classical Quarterly 4 (3-4):194-.
    This book is an attempt "to give a systematic account of the development of plato's theory of knowledge" (page vii). thus it focuses on the dialogues in which epistemological issues come to the fore. these dialogues are "meno", "phaedo", "symposium", "republic", "cratylus", "theastetus", "phaedrus", "timaeus", "sophist", "politicus", "philebus", and "laws". issues discusssed include the theory of recollection, perception, the difference between belief and knowledge, and mathematical knowledge. (staff).
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  30. Cosmic Spiritualism Among the Pythagoreans, Stoics, Jews, and Early Christians.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2019 - In Cosmos in the Ancient World. Cambridge, UK: pp. 270-94.
    This paper traces how the dualism of body and soul, cosmic and human, is bridged in philosophical and religious traditions through appeal to the notion of ‘breath’ (πνεῦμα). It pursues this project by way of a genealogy of pneumatic cosmology and anthropology, covering a wide range of sources, including the Pythagoreans of the fifth century BCE (in particular, Philolaus of Croton); the Stoics of the third and second centuries BCE (especially Posidonius); the Jews writing in Hellenistic Alexandria in the first (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Where Epistemology and Religion Meet What Do(Es) the God(s) Look Like?Maria Michela Sassi - 2013 - Rhizomata 1 (2):283-307.
    The focus of this essay is on Xenophanes’ criticism of anthropomorphic representation of the gods, famously sounding like a declaration of war against a constituent part of the Greek religion, and adopting terms and a tone that are unequalled amongst “pre-Socratic” authors for their directness and explicitness. While the main features of Xenophanes’ polemic are well known thanks to some of the most studied fragments of the pre-Socratic tradition, a different line of enquiry from the usual one is attempted by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  74
    Plato on Pleasures Mixed with Pains: An Asymmetrical Account.Mehmet M. Erginel - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 56:73-122.
    In this paper I aim to show that the restoration model of pleasure as we find it in Plato’s Gorgias, Republic, Timaeus, and Philebus contain a common psychological core, despite the substantial developments and greater sophistication in the later works. I argue that, contrary to the scholarly consensus, all four dialogues take the necessary condition for pain to be a state of imbalance or disharmony rather than a process of destruction or deterioration. Given that the necessary condition for pleasure (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  31
    Introduction.Lars Fredrik Janby, Torstein Tollefsen, Eyjolfur Emilsson & Panagiotis G. Pavlos - 2019 - In Panagiotis G. Pavlos, Lars Fredrik Janby, Eyjolfur Emilsson & Torstein Tollefsen (eds.), Platonism and Christian Thought in Late Antiquity. London: Routledge. pp. 1-13.
    This introduction presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book explores, inter alia, the strategy employed by Augustine in using Plato as a pseudo-prophet against later Platonists and explores Eusebius’ reception of Porphyry’s daemonology. It examines Plotinus’ claim that matter is absolute badness and focuses on Maximus the Confessor’s doctrine of creation and asks whether one may detect any influence on Maximus from Philoponus. The book addresses Christian receptions of Platonic metaphysics (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  55
    Fleeing the Divine: Plato's Rejection of the Ahedonic Ideal in the Philebus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2010 - In John Dillon & Brisson Luc (eds.), Plato's Philebus: Selected Papers From the Eighth Symposium Platonicum. pp. 209-214.
    Note: "Next to Godliness" (Apeiron) is an expanded version of this paper. -/- According to Plato's successors, assimilation to god (homoiosis theoi) was the end (telos) of the Platonic system. There is ample evidence to support this claim in dialogues ranging from the Symposium through the Timaeus. However, the Philebus poses a puzzle for this conception of the Platonic telos. On the one hand, Plato states that the gods are beings beyond pleasure while, on the other hand, he argues (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. A Multiform Desire.Olof Pettersson - 2013 - Dissertation, Uppsala University
    This dissertation is a study of appetite in Plato’s Timaeus, Republic and Phaedrus. In recent research is it often suggested that Plato considers appetite (i) to pertain to the essential needs of the body, (ii) to relate to a distinct set of objects, e.g. food or drink, and (iii) to cause behaviour aiming at sensory pleasure. Exploring how the notion of appetite, directly and indirectly, connects with Plato’s other purposes in these dialogues, this dissertation sets out to evaluate these (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36. Perché Platone nel Timeo torna a sostenere la dottrina delle idee.Rafael Ferber - 1997 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 18 (1):5-28.
    In the whole Corpus Platonicum, we find in principle only one "direct argument" (Charles Kahn) for the existence of the ideas (Tim.51d3-51e6). The purpose of the article is to analyse this argument and to answer the question of why Plato in the Timaeus again defended the existence of the ideas despite the objections in the Parmenides. He defended it again because the latent presupposition of the apories in the Parmenides, the substantial view of sensibles, is removed through the introduction (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37.  38
    Empedocles Democraticus: Hellenistic Biography at the Intersection of Philosophy and Politics.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2016 - In Mauro Bonazzi & Stefan Schorn (eds.), Bios Philosophos: Philosophy in Ancient Greek Biography. 2300 Turnhout, Belgium: pp. 37-71.
    Diogenes Laertius (8.63-6) preserves a fascinating account of the Presocratic philosopher Empedocles' life. There, drawing on evidence from Aristotle, Xanthus, and Timaeus of Tauromenium, the biographer provides several anecdotes which are meant to demonstrate how Empedocles had, contrary to expectation, been a democratic philosopher - a paradox of itself in Ancient Greece. This article unpacks the complex web woven by Diogenes and argues that there is no good reason to assume that Empedocles was indeed a democratic philosopher, and moreover, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. The "Place of Nothing" in Nishida as Chiasma and Chōra.John Krummel - 2015 - Diaphany 1 (1):203-240.
    The paper will explicate the Sache or matter of the dialectic of the founder of Kyoto School philosophy, Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945), from the standpoint of his mature thought, especially from the 1930s and 40s. Rather than providing a simple exposition of his thought I will engage in a creative reading of his concept of basho (place) in terms of chiasma and chōra, or a chiasmatic chōra. I argue that Nishida’s appropriation of nineteenth century German, especially Hegelian, terminology was inadequate in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. On the Problematic Origin of the Forms: Plotinus, Derrida, and the Neoplatonic Subtext of Deconstruction's Critique of Ontology.Matthew C. Halteman - 2006 - Continental Philosophy Review 39 (1):35-58.
    My aim in this paper is to draw Plotinus and Derrida together in a comparison of their respective appropriations of the famous “receptacle” passage in Plato's Timaeus (specifically, Plotinus' discussion of intelligible matter in Enneads 2.4 and Derrida's essay on Timaeus entitled “Kh ō ra”). After setting the stage with a discussion of several instructive similarities between their general philosophical projects, I contend that Plotinus and Derrida take comparable approaches both to thinking the origin of the forms and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Plato and the Universality of Dignity.Marek Piechowiak - 2015 - Themis Polska Nova 9 (2):5-25.
    An important argument in favour of recognising the cultural relativism and against universality of dignity and human rights, is the claim that the concept of dignity is a genuinely modern one. An analysis of a passage from the Demiurge’s speech in Timaeus reveals that Plato devoted time to reflecting on the question of what determines the qualitative difference between certain beings (gods and human being) and the world of things, and what forms the basis for the special treatment of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  95
    A Critique of the Standard Chronology of Plato's Dialogues.Mohammad Bagher Ghomi - manuscript
    That i) there is a somehow determined chronology of Plato’s dialogues among all the chronologies of the last century and ii) this theory is subject to many objections, are points this article intends to discuss. Almost all the main suggested chronologies of the last century agree that Parmenides and Theaetetus should be located after dialogues like Meno, Phaedo and Republic and before Sophist, Politicus, Timaeus, Laws and Philebus. The eight objections we brought against this arrangement claim that to place (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  49
    Next to Godliness: Pleasure and Assimilation in God in the Philebus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Apeiron 45 (1):1-31.
    According to Plato's successors, assimilation to god (homoiosis theoi) was the end (telos) of the Platonic system. There is ample evidence to support this claim in dialogues ranging from the Symposium through the Timaeus. However, the Philebus poses a puzzle for this conception of the Platonic telos. On the one hand, Plato states that the gods are beings beyond pleasure while, on the other hand, he argues that the best human life necessarily involves pleasure. In this paper, I argue (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  55
    Human Wisdom, Studies in Ancient Greek Philosophy.Ostenfeld Erik - 2016 - Sankt Augustin: Academia Verlag.
    This book offers inter alia a systematic investigation of the actual argumentative strategy of Socratic conversation and explorations of Socratic and Platonic morality including an examination ofeudaimonia and the mental conception of health in the Republic as self-control, with a view to the relation of individual health/happiness to social order. The essays cover a period from 1968 to 2012. Some of them are now published for the first time. Self-motion in the later dialogues involves tripartition and tripartition in turn involves (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark