Results for 'Timaeus'

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  1. What Timaeus Can Teach Us: The Importance of Plato’s Timaeus in the 21st Century.Douglas R. Campbell - 2023 - Athena 18:58-73.
    In this article, I make the case for the continued relevance of Plato’s Timaeus. I begin by sketching Allan Bloom’s picture of the natural sciences today in The Closing of the American Mind, according to which the natural sciences are, objectionably, increasingly specialized and have ejected humans qua humans from their purview. I argue that Plato’s Timaeus, despite the falsity of virtually all of its scientific claims, provides a model for how we can pursue scientific questions in a (...)
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  2. Timaeus on Color Mixture.Mark Eli Kalderon - manuscript
    Now with extra footnotes, by editorial demand! Final version accepted by Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy. -/- This essay consists in a trick and a potential insight. The trick consists in a minimalist interpretation of color mixture. The account of color mixture is minimalist in the sense that, given certain background assumptions, there is no more to Timaeus’ account of color mixture than the list of the chromatic pathēmata and the list of how these combine to elicit perceptions of (...)
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  3. The Timaeus and the Longer Way.Mitchell Miller - 2003 - In Gretchen Reydams-Schils (ed.), Plato's Timaeus as Cultural Icon. University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 17-59.
    A study of the significance of Plato's resumption of the simile of model and likeness in the Timaeus, with attention to the place of the Timaeus in the "longer way" that Plato has Socrates announce in the Republic. The reader embarked on the "longer way," I argue, will find in the accounts of the elements and of the kinds of animals unannounced but detailed exhibitions of the "god-given" method of dialectic that Plato has Socrates announce in the Philebus.
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  4. Timaeus 48e-52d and the Third Man Argument.William J. Prior - 1983 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 9:123-147.
    In this article I argue that "Timaeus" 48e-52d, the passage in which Plato introduces the receptacle into his ontology, Contains the material for a satisfactory response to the third man argument. Plato's use of "this" and "such" to distinguish the receptacle, Becoming, And the forms clarifies the nature of his ontology and indicates that the forms are not, In general, self-predicative. This result removes one argument against regarding the "Timaeus" as a late dialogue.
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  5. Plato’s Timaeus and the Limits of Natural Science.Ian MacFarlane - 2023 - Apeiron 56 (3):495-517.
    The relationship between mind and necessity is one of the major points of difficulty for the interpretation of Plato’s Timaeus. At times Timaeus seems to say the demiurge is omnipotent in his creation, and at other times seems to say he is limited by pre-existing matter. Most interpretations take one of the two sides, but this paper proposes a novel approach to interpreting this issue which resolves the difficulty. This paper suggests that in his speech Timaeus presents (...)
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  6. Why should we prefer Plato's Timaeus to Aristotle's Physics? Proclus' critique of Aristotle's explanation of the physical world.Carlos Steel - 2003 - Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies 78:175-187.
    This appears in a supplementary issue of the Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, entitled "Ancient Approaches to Plato's Timaeus.".
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  7.  66
    Physiology in Plato's Timaeus: Irrigation, Digestion, and Respiration.Andres Pelavski - 2014 - Cambridge Classical Journal 60:61-74.
    The third part of the Timaeus, where the account is focused on the cooperation of reason and necessity, has received far less attention than the opening two sections. Particularly, the description of irrigation, digestion and respiration constitutes a challenging passage that has been conspicuously overlooked by scholarly research. Virtually the only modern explanation for the passage was devised by Cornford, and despite several inaccuracies it has been unanimously accepted by all commentators. This paper will challenge Cornford’s interpretation, and use (...)
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  8. Before the Creation of Time in Plato’s Timaeus.Daniel Vázquez - 2022 - In Daniel Vázquez & Alberto Ross (eds.), Time and Cosmology in Plato and the Platonic Tradition. pp. 111–133.
    I defend, against its more recent critics, a literal, factual, and consistent interpretation of Timaeus’ creation of the cosmos and time. My main purpose is to clarify the assumptions under which a literal interpretation of Timaeus’ cosmology becomes philosophically attractive. I propose five exegetical principles that guide my interpretation. Unlike previous literalists, I argue that assuming a “pre-cosmic time” is a mistake. Instead, I challenge the exegetical assumptions scholars impose on the text and argue that for Timaeus, (...)
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  9. Evil, Demiurgy, and the Taming of Necessity in Plato’s Timaeus.Elizabeth Jelinek & Casey Hall - 2022 - International Philosophical Quarterly 62 (1):5-21.
    Plato’s Timaeus reveals a cosmos governed by Necessity and Intellect; commentators have debated the relationship between them. Non-literalists hold that the demiurge, having carte blanche in taming Necessity, is omnipotent. But this omnipotence, alongside the attributes of benevolence and omniscience, creates problems when non-literalists address the problem of evil. We take the demiurge rather as limited by Necessity. This position is supported by episodes within the text, and by its larger consonance with Plato’s philosophy of evil and responsibility. By (...)
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  10. Receptacle/ Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus.Emanuela Bianchi - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction (...)
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  11. The Ontology of Images in Plato’s Timaeus.Samuel Meister - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 30 (6):909-30.
    In the Timaeus, Plato’s Timaeus offers an account of the sensible world in terms of “images” of forms. Often, images are taken to be particulars: either objects or particular property instances (tropes). Contrary to this trend, I argue that images are general characteristics which are immanent in the receptacle, or bundles of such characteristics. Thus, the entire sensible world can be analysed in terms of immanent general characteristics, the receptacle, and forms. Hence, for Timaeus, fundamentally, there are (...)
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  12. The Life Forms and Their Model in Plato's Timaeus.Karel Thein - 2006 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 2:241-273.
    The Intelligible Living Thing, posited as the model of our visible and tangible universe in Plato’s Timaeus, is often taken for a richly structured whole, which is not a simple sum of its four major parts. This assumption seems unwarranted – most specifically, the dialogue contains no hint at any complex intelligible blue print of the world as a teleologically arranged whole, whose goodness is irreducible to the well-being and individual perfection of its parts. To construe the rich structure (...)
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  13. Pre-Cosmic Necessity in Plato's Timaeus.Elizabeth Jelinek - 2011 - Apeiron 44 (3):287-305.
    One aim of this paper is to bring to the surface the problems with the traditional, non-literal interpretation of the pre-cosmos in the Timaeus. Contrary to this traditional interpretation, I show that Necessity is an ateleological cause capable of bringing about the events in the pre-cosmos, and that Intelligence is a teleological cause that produces effects only for the sake of maximizing the good. I conclude that there are no grounds for supposing that Intelligence is a causal force operating (...)
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  14. Cosmic and Human Cognition in the Timaeus.Gábor Betegh - 2018 - In Philosophy of Mind in Antiquity. London: Routledge. pp. 120-140.
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  15. Proclus: Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus, part III – Proclus on the World’s Body. A translation with notes and introduction,.Dirk Baltzly - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the present volume Proclus comments on the creation of the body of the universe in Plato's Timaeus.
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  16. A time for learning and for counting – Egyptians, Greeks and empirical processes in Plato’s Timaeus.Barbara M. Sattler - 2010 - In Richard Mohr & Barbara M. Sattler (eds.), One Book, the Whole Universe: Plato’s Timaeus Today. Parmenides Press. pp. 249-266.
    This paper argues that processes in the sensible realm can be in accord with reason in the Timaeus, since rationality is understood here as being based on regularity, which is conferred onto processes by time. Plato uses two different temporal structures in the Timaeus, associated with the contrast there drawn between Greek and Egyptian approaches to history. The linear order of before and after marks natural processes as rational and underlies the Greek treatment of history. By contrast, a (...)
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  17. The Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato’s Timaeus.Josh Wilburn - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):627-652.
    In the tripartite psychology of the Republic, Plato characterizes the “spirited” part of the soul as the “ally of reason”: like the auxiliaries of the just city, whose distinctive job is to support the policies and judgments passed down by the rulers, spirit’s distinctive “job” in the soul is to support and defend the practical decisions and commands of the reasoning part. This is to include not only defense against external enemies who might interfere with those commands, but also, and (...)
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  18. Cosmos and Perception in Plato's Timaeus.Mark Eli Kalderon - 2023 - New York: Routledge.
    This is an essay on perception and its objects in the Timaeus. Two features of this work are noteworthy. First, the emphasis throughout is on Timaeus' views and not Plato's. Second, I show how broader aspects of Timaeus' cosmology are directly relevant to his philosophy of perception.
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  19. The First Humans in Plato’s Timaeus.Pavel Gregorić - 2012 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):183-198.
    Plato’s Timaeus gives an account of the creation of the world and of human race. The text suggests that there was a first generation of human beings, and that they were all men. The paper raises difficulties for this traditional view, and considers an alternative, suggested in more recent literature, according to which humans of the first generation were sexually undifferentiated. The paper raises difficulties for the alternative view as well, and examines the third possibility, advocated by some ancient (...)
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  20. Moral Virtue and Assimilation to God in Plato's Timaeus.Timothy A. Mahoney - 2005 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Xxviii: Summer 2005. Oxford University Press. pp. 77-91.
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  21.  76
    Plato’s Conception of the Self. The Mind-Body Problem and Its Ancient Origin in the Timaeus.Francesco Fronterotta - 2015 - In Diego De Brasi & Sabine Föllinger (eds.), Anthropologie in Antike und Gegenwart. Biologische und philosophische Entwürfe vom Menschen. Freiburg/München: Karl Alber. pp. 35-58.
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  22. Proclus: Commentary on Plato's Timaeus: Volume 5, Book 4.Dirk Baltzly (ed.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    Proclus' commentary on Plato's dialogue Timaeus is arguably the most important commentary on a text of Plato, offering unparalleled insights into eight centuries of Platonic interpretation. It has had an enormous influence on subsequent Plato scholarship. This edition offers the first new English translation of the work for nearly two centuries, building on significant recent advances in scholarship on Neoplatonic commentators. It provides an invaluable record of early interpretations of Plato's dialogue, while also presenting Proclus' own views on the (...)
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  23. Proclus: Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus, part IV – Proclus on the World Soul. A translation with notes and introduction.Dirk Baltzly - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the present volume Proclus describes the 'creation' of the soul that animates the entire universe. This is not a literal creation, for Proclus argues that Plato means only to convey the eternal dependence of the World Soul upon higher causes. In his exegesis of Plato's text, Proclus addresses a range of issues in Pythagorean harmonic theory, as well as questions about the way in which the World Soul knows both forms and the visible reality that comprises its body. This (...)
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  24.  86
    Overturning Soul-Body Dualism in Plato's Timaeus.Monica Vilhauer - 2022 - In Otherwise Than the Binary: New Feminist Readings in Ancient Philosophy and Culture. Albany: SUNY Press. pp. 185-210.
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  25. Eternity and Time in Plato’s Timaeus.Viktor Ilievski - 2015 - Antiquite Vivante 65:5-22.
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  26. Przemowa Demiurga w Platońskim „Timajosie” a współczesne pojęcie godności [Demiurge’s Speech in Plato’s “Timaeus” and the Contemporary Concept of Dignity].Marek Piechowiak - 2013 - In Antoni Dębiński (ed.), Abiit, non obiit. Księga poświęcona pamięci Księdza Profesora Antoniego Kościa SVD. Wydawnictwo KUL. pp. 655-665.
    Today, dignity recognized as a fundamental value across legal systems is equal, inherent and inalienable, inviolable, is the source of human rights and is essential for its subject to be recognized as an autotelic entity (an end in itself) that cannot be treated as an object. The analysis of the extract from Plato’s Demiurge’s speech in Timaeus reveals that Plato developed a reflection on something that determines the qualitative difference between certain beings and the world of things, and that (...)
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  27.  78
    Form and Flux in the Theaetetus_ and _Timaeus.David P. Hunt - 2002 - In Plato's Forms: Varieties of Interpretation. Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books. pp. 151-167.
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  28.  38
    Cosmos and Perception in Plato’s Timaeus: In the Eye of the Cognitive Storm. By Mark Eli Kalderon. [REVIEW]Douglas R. Campbell - 2024 - Ancient Philosophy 44 (1):255-258.
    This is an impressive and important book about perception in Plato’s Timaeus, but most of its readers will probably be researchers who are interested in much broader questions about the dialogue. There is nothing deficient or lacking about this treatment of perception, but this book should be put alongside Thomas Johansen’s Plato’s Natural Philosophy and Sarah Broadie’s Nature and Divinity in the sense that this is, for all intents and purposes, a monograph about the whole Timaeus, even though (...)
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  29. Symmetry and asymmetry in the construction of 'elements' in the Timaeus.D. R. Lloyd - 2006 - Classical Quarterly 56 (2):459-474.
    In this paper I contend that the 'superfluity' of triangles is only apparent; all those specified are indeed required for the smallest sub-units, so long as the symmetry of the final body to be constructed is taken into account at earlier stages.
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  30. The Sui Generis Problem in Plato's Timaeus.Michael Lucana - 2015 - Dissertation, San Francisco State University
    In the Timaeus, Plato tells the story of a divine craftsman who, using the world of intelligibles as a model, produces a living and orderly universe from the pre-existing physical elements. The Demiurge in the cosmological narrative has at various times been identified by interpreters of Plato with the model, the product, or even simultaneously both. I intend to argue that there is a strong basis for Plato’s cosmology to be structurally triadic, that is, between a distinct model, cause, (...)
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  31. The ‘Problem of Fire’: Referring to Phenomena in Plato’s Timaeus.David P. Hunt - 1998 - Ancient Philosophy 18 (1):69-80.
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  32. Wear The Teachings of Syrianus on Plato's Timaeus and Parmenides. Pp. xiv + 353. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2011. Cased, €108, US$153. ISBN: 978-90-04-19290-4. [REVIEW]Eugene V. Afonasin - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):103-105.
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  33. Plato's Theology in the Timaeus 29e-30a.Panagiotis Pavlos - 2014 - ΑΚΑΔΗΜΕΙΑ: Researches on Platonism History 9:49-58.
    In this paper the Platonic concepts of Goodness, Belief and Will as they appear in the passage 29d–30a of the Timeaus, are examined . The main intention is, through this examination, to explore whether –and, if yes, why- these notions constitute essential elements of Plato’s theology.
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  34. Aspects of Plato's political thinking in the Timaeus and the 10th book of Laws.Panagiotis Pavlos - 2013 - In Alexey V. Tsyb (ed.), ΠΛΑΤΩΝΟΠΟΛΙΣ: Philosophy of Antiquity as an interdisciplinary synthesis of philosophical, historical and philological studies. Sociological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg's Plato Society. pp. 40-44.
    Short communication published in the Proceedings of the International Summer School for Young Researchers Platwnopolis, in St. Petersburg, Russia, 2012.
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  35.  83
    Studies on the text of Plato's Timaeus and Critias - Jonkers the textual tradition of Plato's Timaeus and Critias. Pp. XVIII + 548. Leiden and boston: Brill, 2017. Cased, €180, us$202. Isbn: 978-90-04-32591-3. [REVIEW]Colin Guthrie King - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (2):363-365.
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  36. The Soul’s Tomb: Plato on the Body as the Cause of Psychic Disorders.Douglas R. Campbell - 2022 - Apeiron 55 (1):119-139.
    I argue that, according to Plato, the body is the sole cause of psychic disorders. This view is expressed at Timaeus 86b in an ambiguous sentence that has been widely misunderstood by translators and commentators. The goal of this article is to offer a new understanding of Plato’s text and view. In the first section, I argue that although the body is the result of the gods’ best efforts, their sub-optimal materials meant that the soul is constantly vulnerable to (...)
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  37. Platons Timaios und Kants Übergangsschrift (2015). Sonderegger (ed.) - 2015 - Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann.
    Following the structuring hints given by Plato in his Timaeus you find, that the dialogue – actually Timaeus' lecture – falls in two parts, not in three as Cornford, Brisson and others suggest. The main division follows the two invocations of the gods (27c, 48d). The first part presents the world in its noetic form, poetically described as the work of the demiurg. Timaeus opens this part giving first his premises in the form of an introduction, which (...)
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  38. Moral education and the spirited part of the soul in Plato's laws.Joshua Wilburn - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 45:63.
    In this paper I argue that although the Republic’s tripartite theory of the soul is not explicitly endorsed in Plato’s late work the Laws, it continues to inform the Laws from beneath the surface of the text. In particular, I argue that the spirited part of the soul continues to play a major role in moral education and development in the Laws (as it did in earlier texts, where it is characterized as reason’s psychic ‘ally’). I examine the programs of (...)
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  39. Making Room for Particulars: Plato’s Receptacle as Space, Not Substratum.Christopher Buckels - 2016 - Apeiron 49 (3):303-328.
    The ‘traditional’ interpretation of the Receptacle in Plato’s Timaeus maintains that its parts act as substrata to ordinary particulars such as dogs and tables: particulars are form-matter compounds to which Forms supply properties and the Receptacle supplies a substratum, as well as a space in which these compounds come to be. I argue, against this view, that parts of the Receptacle cannot act as substrata for those particulars. I also argue, making use of contemporary discussions of supersubstantivalism, against a (...)
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  40. A Platonic Trope Bundle Theory.Christopher Buckels - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy Today 2 (2):91-112.
    This paper provides a rational reconstruction of a Platonic trope bundle theory that is a live alternative to contemporary bundle theories. According to the theory, Platonic particulars are composed of what Plato calls images of Forms; contemporary metaphysicians call these tropes. Tropes are dependent on Forms and the Receptacle, while trope bundles are structured by natural kinds using the Phaedo's principles of inclusion and exclusion and the Timaeus’ geometrised elements, as well as by co-location in the Receptacle. Key elements (...)
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  41. La metafísica de Platón según san Alberto Magno.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2015 - In Oscar Mauricio Donato (ed.), En torno a Platón. Universidad Libre de Colombia. pp. 17-64.
    Although St. Albert the Great is known for his assimilation of Aristotle’s thought, he holds Plato in high regard. Yet Aristotle largely guides Albert’s understanding of Plato and Aristotelian criticism against him is repeated along Albert’s work. The objections raised in the first book of the Metaphysics are especially recurrent. Therefore to study Albert’s commentary on such objections in some detail, as we do in these pages, has considerable interest. Criticism against Plato focuses on his conception of the universal and (...)
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  42. Triangles, Tropes, and τὰ τοιαʋ ̃τα: A Platonic Trope Theory.Christopher Buckels - 2018 - Plato Journal: The Journal of the International Plato Society 18:9-24.
    A standard interpretation of Plato’s metaphysics holds that sensible particulars are images of Forms. Such particulars are fairly independent, like Aristotelian substances. I argue that this is incorrect: Platonic particulars are not Form images but aggregates of Form images, which are property-instances. Timaeus 49e-50a focuses on “this-suches” and even goes so far as to claim that they compose other things. I argue that Form images are this-suches, which are tropes. I also examine the geometrical account, showing that the geometrical (...)
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  43. The Soul’s Tool: Plato on the Usefulness of the Body.Douglas R. Campbell - 2022 - Elenchos 43 (1):7-27.
    This paper concerns Plato’s characterization of the body as the soul’s tool. I take perception as an example of the body’s usefulness. I explore the Timaeus’ view that perception provides us with models of orderliness. Then, I argue that perception of confusing sensible objects is necessary for our cognitive development too. Lastly, I consider the instrumentality relationship more generally and its place in Plato’s teleological worldview.
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  44. Is the Form of the Good a Final Cause for Plato?Elizabeth Jelinek - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (2):99-116.
    Many assume that Plato's Form of the Good is a final cause. This might be true if one assumes an Aristotelian definition of final cause; however, I argue that if one adopts Plato's conception of final causation as evidenced in the Phaedo and Timaeus, the claim that the Form of the Good is a final cause for Plato is untenable.
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  45. Located in Space: Plato’s Theory of Psychic Motion.Douglas R. Campbell - 2022 - Ancient Philosophy 42 (2):419-442.
    I argue that Plato thinks that the soul has location, surface, depth, and extension, and that the Timaeus’ composition of the soul out of eight circles is intended literally. A novel contribution is the development of an account of corporeality that denies the entailment that the soul is corporeal. I conclude by examining Aristotle’s objection to the Timaeus’ psychology and then the intellectual history of this reading of Plato.
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  46. Учение прокла о надкосмических душах.Svetlana Mesyats - 2018 - Schole 12 (2):599-631.
    According to Marinus of Samaria, Proclus was the author of many philosophical doctrines. In particular he was the first to assert the existence of a kind of souls that are capable of simultaneously seeing several ideas and situated between the divine Intellect which embraces all things together by a single intuition, and the souls whose thoughts pass from one idea to another. In the following we are going to answer the question, what kind of souls did Proclus discover and why (...)
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  47. Plato’s Recollection Argument in the Philebus.Naoya Iwata - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (2):189-212.
    Many scholars have denied that Plato’s argument about desire at Philebus 34c10–35d7 is related to his recollection arguments in the Meno and Phaedo, because it is concerned only with postnatal experiences of pleasure. This paper argues against their denial by showing that the desire argument in question is intended to prove the soul’s possession of innate memory of pleasure. This innateness interpretation will be supported by a close analysis of the Timaeus, where Plato suggests that our inborn desires for (...)
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  48. Aristotle’s Critique of Timaean Psychology.Jason W. Carter - 2017 - Rhizomata 5 (1):51-78.
    Of all the criticisms that Aristotle gives of his predecessors’ theories of soul in De anima I.3–5, none seems more unmotivated than the ones directed against the world soul of Plato’s Timaeus. Against the current scholarly consensus, I claim that the status of Aristotle’s criticisms is philosophical rather than eristical, and that they provide important philosophical reasons, independent of Phys. VIII.10 and Metaph. Λ.6, for believing that νοῦς is without spatial extension, and that its thinking is not a physical (...)
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  49. A Likely Account of Necessity: Plato’s Receptacle as a Physical and Metaphysical Foundation for Space.Barbara Sattler - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):159-195.
    This paper aims to show that—and how—Plato’s notion of the receptacle in the Timaeus provides the conditions for developing a mathematical as well as a physical space without itself being space. In response to the debate whether Plato’s receptacle is a conception of space or of matter, I suggest employing criteria from topology and the theory of metric spaces as the most basic ones available. I show that the receptacle fulfils its main task–allowing the elements qua images of the (...)
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  50. The Contents of the Receptacle.Sarah Broadie - 2003 - Modern Schoolman 80 (3):171-190.
    The Receptacle of the title is, of course, the ‘Receptacle of all becoming’ in Plato’s Timaeus. Plato likens it to a ‘nurse’, and even calls it a ‘mother’. He speaks of it as that in which its contents come to be, only in their turn to disappear from it. He compares it to a mass of gold which someone incessantly remoulds into different shape. He declares it completely unchanging: ‘it does not depart from its own character in any way'. (...)
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