Results for 'dao'

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  1. Impartiality and Infectious Disease: Prioritizing Individuals Versus the Collective in Antibiotic Prescription.Bernadine Dao, Thomas Douglas, Alberto Giubilini, Julian Savulescu, Michael Selgelid & Nadira S. Faber - 2019 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 10 (1):63-69.
    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global public health disaster driven largely by antibiotic use in human health care. Doctors considering whether to prescribe antibiotics face an ethical (...)
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  2. 論儒家哲學之的實踐屬性與歷史屬性On the Practice and History Attributes of theDaoin the Confucian Philosophy.Keqian Xu - 2006 - 學術論壇 Academic Forum, 2006 (11):32-34.
    The important feature of Dao as a philosophic category in early Confucian philosophy is its prominent practical and historical properties, which make it different from those western (...)
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  3. ChineseDaoand WesternTruth”: A Comparative and Dynamic Perspective.Keqian Xu - 2010 - Asian Social Science 6 (12):8.
    In the Pre-Qin time, pursuingDaowas the main task in the scholarship of most of the ancient Chinese philosophers, while the Ancient Greek philosophers considered (...)pursuingTruthas their ultimate goal. While theDaoin ancient Chinese texts and theTruthin ancient Greek philosophic literature do share or cross-cover certain connotations, there are subtle and important differences between the two comparable philosophic concepts. These differences have deep and profound impact on the later development of Chinese and Western philosophy and culture respectively. Interestingly, while the modern Chinese philosophy has gradually accepted and established the Western conception ofTruthon its way towards modernization, thepost-modernWestern philosophy is just undergoing a process of deconstructing its traditional concept ofTruth”, thus, in a certain sense, going closer to the traditional ChineseDao”. From a comparative, relative and dynamic perspective, there could possibly be a fusion of horizon between the ChineseDaoand the WesternTruth”. (shrink)
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  4.  26
    Critical Analysis of the Philosophical Conception of Dao in Laozi's Daodejing and Being in Heidegger'sBeing and Time”.Lucian Green - manuscript
    That dao and being are correct as written about by Laozi and Heidegger respectively is exposed through eight focal points.
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  5.  23
    Critical Analysis of the Philosophical Conception of Verification of Being/the Self in Heidegger'sBeing and TimeAgainst Dao/the Other in Laozi's Daodejing.Lucian Green - 2015 - Best Thinking.
    That dao and being are correct as written about by Laozi and Heidegger respectively is exposed through eight perspectives.
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  6. Makeham, John, Ed., Dao Companion to Neo-Confucian Philosophy: Dordrecht: Springer, 2010, Xliii + 488 Pages.Deborah A. Sommer - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):283-287.
    This volume includes nineteen articles by scholars from Asia, North America, and Europe on Chinese thinkers from the eleventh to the eighteenth centuries. Included here are intellectual (...)
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  7. Responding with Dao : Early Daoist Ethics and the Environment.Eric Sean Nelson - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (3):pp. 294-316.
    Early Daoism, as articulated in the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi, indirectly addresses environmental issues by intimating a non-reductive naturalistic ethics calling on humans to be open (...)and responsive to the specificities and interconnections of the world and environment to which they belong. "Dao" is not a substantial immanent or transcendent entity but the lived enactment of the intrinsic worth of the "myriad things" and the natural world occurring through how humans address and are addressed by them. Early Daoism potentially corrects both anthropocentrism and biocentrism in environmental ethics by disclosing the things themselves in the context of the selfcultivation of life. Given increasing environmental devastation and the dominance of views, practices, and institutions reducing nature to a background and/or raw material for human activity, this "ethics of encounter" discloses the life of things as inexhaustibly more than human projects and constructs, extending ethical recognition and responsibility beyond social relations and the social self. (shrink)
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  8. Olberding, Amy, Ed., Dao Companion to the Analects: New York: Springer, 2014, Vi + 369 Pages[REVIEW]Bryan Van Norden - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):605-608.
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  9.  89
    Interpreting Dao () BetweenWay-MakingandBe-Wëgen’.Massimiliano Lacertosa - 2018 - In Gregory Bracken (ed.), Ancient and Modern Practices of Citizenship in Asia and the West: Care of the Self. Amsterdam, Paesi Bassi: pp. 103-120.
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  10.  89
    Dao, Harmony and Personhood: Towards a Confucian Ethics of Technology.Pak-Hang Wong - 2012 - Philosophy and Technology 25 (1):67-86.
    A closer look at the theories and questions in philosophy of technology and ethics of technology shows the absence and marginality of non-Western philosophical traditions in (...)the discussions. Although, increasingly, some philosophers have sought to introduce non-Western philosophical traditions into the debates, there are few systematic attempts to construct and articulate general accounts of ethics and technology based on other philosophical traditions. This situation is understandable, for the questions of modern sciences and technologies appear to be originated from the West; at the same time, the situation is undesirable. The overall aim of this paper, therefore, is to introduce an alternative account of ethics of technology based on the Confucian tradition. In doing so, it is hoped that the current paper can initiate a relatively uncharted field in philosophy of technology and ethics of technology. (shrink)
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  11. The Dao Against the Tyrant: The Limitation of Power in the Political Thought of Ancient China.Daniel Rodríguez Carreiro - 2013 - Libertarian Papers 5:111-152.
    In Chinese history the periods known as Spring and Autumn (770-476 BC) and the Warring States (475-221 BC) were times of conflict and political instability caused (...) by the increasing power of centralized and competing states. During this time of crisis many schools of thought appeared to offer different philosophical doctrines. This paper describes and studies ideas about the limitation of power defended by these different schools of ancient Chinese thought, and suggests some reasons why they failed to prevent the emergence of an authoritarian imperial government in early China. (shrink)
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  12. The Dao of Kongzi.Bryan W. van Norden - 2002 - Asian Philosophy 12 (3):157 – 171.
    This paper introduces the Analects of Kongzi (better known to English-speakers as 'Confucius') to non-specialist readers, and discusses two major lines of interpretation. According to one (...) group of interpretations, the key to understanding the Analects is passage 4.15, in which a disciple says that 'loyalty' and 'reciprocity' together make up the 'one thread' of the Master's teachings. More recently, some interpreters have emphasised passage 13.3, which discusses 'correcting names': bringing words and things into proper alignment. This paper argues that both approaches are mistaken, based on interpolated and unrepresentative passages. The paper closes with a brief suggestion that the Analects reveals a thinker who emphasises cultivating virtues that allow for the appreciation of complex individual contexts, rather than one who seeks systematic generalisations. An afterword to the paper suggests that we should avoid both 'methodological dualism' (which posits a radical incommensurability between Western and Eastern philosophies) and 'the perennial philosophy' (which ignores differences in favour of similarities). (shrink)
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  13. Questioning Dao: Skepticism, Mysticism, and Ethics in the Zhuangzi.Eric Sean Nelson - 2008 - International Journal of the Asian Philosophical Association 1:5-19.
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  14.  86
    Buddhism and the Dao in Tang China: The Impact of Confucianism and Daoism on the Philosophy of Chengguan.Imre Hamar - 1999 - Acta Orientalia Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae 52 (3-4):283-292.
    Chengguan (738839), the fourth patriarch of the Huayan school of Chinese Buddhism, declared the primacy of Buddhism over Confucianism and Daoism and criticised these philosophies from (...)a Buddhist stance. In his subcommentary to the Avata?saka Sutra, he defines ten differences between Buddhism and indigenous philosophies, which are discussed in this paper. However, he also often quoted from Chinese Classics to clarify the meaning of a Buddhist tenet. On these occasions he sometimes adds that he only borrows the words but not their meaning. We investigate how he places these words into a new, Buddhist context. (shrink)
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  15. A Daoist Model For A Kantian Church.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2013 - Comparative Philosophy 4 (2):67-89.
    Although significant differences undoubtedly exist between Daoism and Kants philosophy, the two systems also have some noteworthy similarities. After calling attention to a few such parallels (...)and sketching the outlines of Kants philosophy of religion, this article focuses on an often-neglected feature of the latter: the four guiding principles of what Kant calls aninvisible church”. Numerous passages from Lao Zis classic text, Dao-De-Jing, seem to uphold these same principles, thus suggesting that they can also be interpreted as core features of a Daoist philosophy of life. A crucial difference, however, is that members of a Daoist church would focus on contentment, whereas Kantian churches modeled on Christianity would strive for perfection. The article therefore concludes by considering what a synthesis might look like, if a Kantian church were to be based on a Daoist interpretation of these four fundamental principles. (shrink)
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  16. The Way of Nonacquisition: Jizang's Philosophy of Ontic Indeterminacy.Chien-Hsing Ho - 2014 - In Chen-Kuo Lin & Michael Radich (eds.), A Distant Mirror: Articulating Indic Ideas in Sixth and Seventh Century Chinese Buddhism. Hamburg: Hamburg University Press. pp. 397-418.
    For Jizang (549623), a prominent philosophical exponent of Chinese Madhyamaka, all things are empty of determinate form or nature. Given anything X, no linguistic item can (...)truly and conclusively be applied to X in the sense of positing a determinate form or nature therein. This philosophy of ontic indeterminacy is connected closely with his notion of the Way (dao), which seems to indicate a kind of ineffable principle of reality. However, Jizang also equates the Way with nonacquisition as a conscious state of freedom from any attachment and definite understanding whatsoever. The issue then becomes pressing as to how we are to understand Jizang's notion of the Way. Does it indicate some metaphysical principle or reality? Is it actually a skilful expedient to lead one to the consummate state of complete spiritual freedom? How is this issue related to Jizang's conception of ontic indeterminacy? In this book chapter, I examine Jizang's key writings in an attempt to clarify his ontological position. (shrink)
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  17. A Different Type of Individualism in Zhuangzi.Keqian Xu - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):445-462.
    Although being widely considered as only a Western tradition, individualism is not absent in traditional Chinese philosophy and culture. In some of the classic Chinese philosophic works (...)
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  18. 论作为道路与方法的庄子之”.Keqian Xu - 2000 - 中国哲学史(The History of Chinese Philosophy) 2000 (4):66-72.
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  19. Ritual and Rightness in the Analects.Hagop Sarkissian - 2013 - In Amy Olberding (ed.), Dao Companion to the Analects. pp. 95-116.
    Li () and yi () are two central moral concepts in the Analects. Li has a broad semantic range, referring to formal ceremonial rituals on the one (...)
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  20.  92
    The Phenomenology of Ritual Resistance: Colin Kaepernick as Confucian Sage.Philip J. Walsh - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy.
    In 2016, Colin Kaepernick, a quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers, remained seated during the national anthem in order to protest racial injustice and police brutality against (...)
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  21. Do Filial Values Corrupt? How Can We Know? Clarifying and Assessing the Recent Confucian Debate.Hagop Sarkissian - 2020 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 19 (2):193-207.
    In a number of papers, Liu Qingping has critiqued Confucianisms commitment toconsanguineous affectionor filial values, claiming it to be excessive and indefensible. Many have (...)taken issue with his textual readings and interpretive claims, but these responses do little to undermine the force of his central claim that filial values cause widespread corruption in Chinese society. This is not an interpretive claim but an empirical one. If true, it merits serious consideration. But is it true? How can we know? I survey the empirical evidence and argue that there is no stable or direct relationship between filial values and corruption. Instead, other cultural dimensions are more robust predictors of corruption. As it happens, China ranks very high in these other cultural dimensions. I conclude that if the empirical research is correct then Lius claims lack support. (shrink)
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  22.  22
    Virtuous Contempt (Wu ) in the Analects.Hagop Sarkissian - forthcoming - In Justin Tiwald (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Chinese Philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Much is said about what Kongzi liked or cherished. Kongzi revered the rituals of the Zhou. He cherished tradition and classical music. He loved the Odes. Far (...)
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  23.  18
    Skill and Expertise in Three Schools of Classical Chinese Thought.Hagop Sarkissian - forthcoming - In Ellen Fridland & Carlotta Pavese (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Skill and Expertise. Routledge.
    The classical Chinese philosophical tradition (ca. 6th to 3rd centuries BCE) contains rich discussion of skill and expertise. Various texts exalt skilled exemplars (whether historical persons or (...)
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  24. On the Ancient Idea That Music Shapes Character.James Harold - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (3):341-354.
    Ancient Chinese and Greek thinkers alike were preoccupied with the moral value of music; they distinguished between good and bad music by looking at the musics (...)effect on moral character. The idea can be understood in terms of two closely related questions. Does music have the power to affect the ethical character of either listener or performer? If it does, is it better as music for doing so? I argue that an affirmative answers to both questions are more plausible than it might seem at first. (shrink)
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  25. Seek and You Will Find It; Let Go and You Will Lose It: Exploring a Confucian Approach to Human Dignity.Peimin Ni - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):173-198.
    While the concept of Menschenwürde (universal human dignity) has served as the foundation for human rights, it is absent in the Confucian tradition. However, this does not (...)
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  26.  29
    Daoism and Confucianism.Karyn L. Lai - 2014 - In Xiaogan Liu (ed.), Dao Companion to Daoist Philosophy. Springer. pp. 489-511.
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  27. Of Fish, Butterflies and Birds: Relativism and Nonrelative Valuation in the Zhuangzi.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2015 - Asian Philosophy 25 (3):238-252.
    I argue that the main theme of the Zhuangzi is that of spiritual transformation. If there is no such theme in the Zhuangzi, it becomes an obscure (...)
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  28.  76
    Chai, David, Zhuangzi and the Becoming of Nothingness: Albany: State University of New York Press, 2019, 216 Pages.Eric Nelson - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (2):291-294.
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  29. OnHumane LoveandKinship Love”.Bryan W. Van Norden - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (2):125-129.
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  30. Correlative Reasoning About Water in Mengzi 6A2.Nicholaos Jones - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (2):193-207.
    Mengzi 孟子 6A2 contains the famous water analogy for the innate goodness of human nature. Some evaluate Mengzis reasoning as strong and sophisticated; others, as weak (...)or sophistical. I urge for more nuance in our evaluation. Mengzis reasoning fares poorly when judged by contemporary standards of analogical strength. However, if we evaluate the analogy as an instance of correlative thinking within a yin-yang 陰陽 cosmology, his reasoning fares well. That cosmology provides good reason to assert that water tends to flow downward, not because of available empirical evidence, but because water correlates to yin and yin correlates to naturally downward motion. Substantiating these contentions also gives occasion to better understand the nature of correlative reasoning in classical Chinese philosophy. (shrink)
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  31.  46
    O que é a Educação Infantil?Khyara Fantollini dos Santos - manuscript
    Entendemos a Educação Infantil em amplo sentido, isto é, um leque de conceitos em que pode-se gozar dentro da Pedagogia e as Ciências da Educação, (...)é nessa modalidade de ensino que podem-se englobar todas as esferas educativas vivenciadas pelas crianças de, conforme Lei, 0 à 5 anos de idade, pela família e, também, pelo próprio corpo social, antes mesmo de atingir a idade educativa obrigatória que é, vide Lei, aproximadamente a partir dos 7 anos de idade. A EI também pode ser considerada como uma das mais complexas fazes do desenvolvimento humano, em diversas esferas, seja ela a intelectual, emocional, social, motora, psicomotora, etc. uma vez que tratam-se de crianças que, muitas vezes, têm o primeiro contato com um novo ambiente, que é o ambiente escolar. Diante disso, torna-se primordial a inserção das crianças em berçários, creches e Educação Maternal, também denominado de pré-escola, para que as mesmas interajam entre seus semelhantes e comecem a aproximar-se da vida social e educacional, estando preparadas para uma nova etapa educacional. Mediante essa perspectiva da vida psicopedagógica das crianças, Kuhlmann Júnior ressalta que: Pode-se falar deEducação Infantilem um sentido bastante amplo, envolvendo toda e qualquer forma de educação da criança na família, na comunidade, na sociedade e na cultura em que viva (2003. p. 469). -/- Mediante a análise de Kuhlmann, logo, a EI designa a periodicidade regular a uma entidade educativa exterior ao domicílio, isto é, trata-se do lapso da vida escolar em que se volta-se, pedagogicamente, ao público entre 0 e 5 anos de idade no Brasil; vale salientar que nessa idade entre 0 e 5 anos, as crianças não estão submetidas a obrigatoriedade do ingresso na vida escolar. A Constituição brasileira de 1988 define no Título VIII (Da Ordem Social), Capítulo III (Da Educação, da Cultura e do Desporto), Seção I (Da Educação), Artigo 208 que: O dever do Estado com a educação será efetivado mediante a garantia de: Inciso IVeducação infantil, em creche e pré-escola, às crianças até 5 (cinco) anos de idade. (Constituição Federal, 2016. p. 63). -/- A Lei de Diretrizes e Bases da Educação Nacional, especificamente a Lei 9394/96, denomina a Creche como sendo a entidade responsável por promover o primeiro contato das crianças com o ambiente escolar, a idade é determinada como sendo de 0 a 3 anos de idade (Artigo 30. Inciso I). Também denomina de pré-escola a instituição responsável pelo ensino de crianças entre 4 e 6 anos de idade (Artigo 30. Inciso II). Não obstante, mediante Lei 11274/06 que reedita o Artigo 32 da Lei 9394/96, o ensino fundamental passou a ser de 9 (nove) anos de idade e não mais de 8 (oito), logo, as crianças que com 6 (seis) anos de idade não eram submetidas a obrigatoriedade do estudo, passaram a fazer parte da conformação obrigatória, isto é, elas não fazem mais parte do ensino eletivo ou optativo da pré-escola e sim do ensino fundamental obrigatório. -/- Dito isto, a LDB diz na Seção II (Da Educação Infantil) e no Artigo 29 que a Educação Infantil é tida como a primeira etapa da Educação Básica, e tem por objetivo, a promoção e o favorecimento do desenvolvimento integral da criança de 0 à 5 anos de idade, nos mais variados aspectos possíveis, sendo eles o físico, psicológico, intelectual e social, sendo mais que uma complementação da instrução familiar e da sociedade (BRASIL, 2005. p. 17). Seguindo a linha teórica acerca das crianças, o Artigo 30, da mesma, ressalta que a EI será promovida por meio de creches para crianças de 0 a 3 anos e em pré-escolas para o público entre 4 e 5 anos de idade, como enaltecido supracitadamente. No que se refere a avaliação, no Artigo 31 esse processo será feito porventura do acompanhamento e registro do desenvolvimento das crianças, sem que haja quaisquer tipos de promoção, mesmo que vise o acesso ao Ensino Fundamental. -/- Vale enfatizar que essa modalidade de ensino tem uma finalidade pedagógica, um trabalho que se apropria da realidade e dos conhecimentos infantis como estopim e os amplia mediante atividades que tem uma certa significação concreta para a vida dos infantes e, isocronicamente asseguram a aquisição de novos conhecimentos. Doravante e por meio dessa perspectiva, é imprescindível que o educador da EI preocupe-se com o arranjo e aplicação dos trabalhos fazendo, assim, uma contribuição para a ascensão do infante de 0 a 5 anos. -/- O Referencial Curricular Nacional para a Educação Infantil de 1998 ressalta que deve-se levam em conta que os infantes são distintos entre si, isto é, que cada um possui um ritmo peculiar de aprendizagem. Dito isto, o educador deverá preparar-se para promover aos educandos uma educação alicerçada na condição de aprendizagem peculiar de cada um deles, considerando-se bastante singulares e com particularidades. Para isso, o governo deverá fornecer um alicerce na formação dos educadores, preparando-os para enfrentar esse mundo repleto de dificuldades mas, no fim, de uma extensa realização pessoal e profissional. Ante as características peculiares dos ritmos das crianças, o grande desafio que ora implica na EI é com que os profissionais consigam compreender, conhecer e reconhecer o jeito peculiar dos infantes serem e estarem inseridos no mundo. O RCN da modalidade EI ainda explicita que a entidade promovente da EI deve tornar acessível a todos os infantes que ora frequentam-no, indiscriminadamente, elementos culturais que enriquecem a ascensão e a inserção social dos mesmos. -/- A EI é caracterizada, historicamente, pelo assistencialismo reduzido e a um recinto que vise, primordialmente, os cuidados com os infantes. Ao passo dos anos, e diversas metamorfoses ocorridas nas tendências educacionais, passou a ser teorizada como um simples processo educativo. -/- Paulo Freire (1921-1997) alertava que: Quando se tira da criança a possibilidade este ou aquele espaço da realidade, na verdade se está alienando-a da sua capacidade de construir seus conhecimentos. Porque o ato de conhecer é tão vital quanto comer ou dormir; e eu não posso comer por alguém (FREIRE, 1983. p. 36). Logo, nesse contexto é sumamente impossível desassociar os termos cuidar e o educar, eixos cêntricos que dão características peculiares na constituição do espaço e do ambiente escolar nesse lapso da educação. Doravante, contradizendo ao que muitos ainda pensam o cuidar e o educar não remetem à perspectiva assistencialista e ao processo de ensino e aprendizagem dos mesmos, uma vez que ambos complementam-se, além de integrarem-se para uma melhor promoção do desenvolvimento do infante, no que se refere à edificação de sua autonomia e totalidade. -/- O infante carece de cuidados básicos no que se refere à saúde, os quais pode ser obtido mediante uma alimentação saudável e balanceada, assepsia, educação física, momentos de ópio, entre outras inúmeras situações peculiares à crianças e que exigem do educador uma atenção especial em relação aos cuidados com a criança. Todavia, é primordial que o profissional da EI desenvolva um trabalho educacional voltado ao favorecimento e a condução para a descoberta e edificação de sua identidade, apropriando-se de saberes necessários à constituição da autonomia tanto do infante, que ora se torna imprescindível quanto do próprio educador. -/- No que tange a afetividade na EI, falamos de uma constituição do cenário contemporâneo dos ambientes escolares e que, no futuro, tornara-se sumamente imprescindível algum marco ou lapsos que persistem e poderão persistir na educação futura do fundamental e até mesmo do médio ou ensino universitário, principalmente questões de vivência com os outros. Compreensão do outro, desenvolvimento de projetos, percepção da interdependência, de não à quaisquer tipos de violência, administração de possíveis conflitos, descoberta do outro, participação em projetos comuns, prazer no esforço alheio, cooperativada são essenciais nesses primeiros anos escolares e, para que isso torne-se realidade, é necessário que se abra um leque de possibilidades para o futuro mediante a formação atual dos educadores, logo com um alicerce maior em suas formações, o educador(a) estará preparado para atuar frente ao infante, unindo esse lapso fundamental de sua vida dos primeiros anos escolares. -/- REFERÊNCIAS BIBLIOGRÁFICAS -/- BRASIL. [Constituição (1988)]. Constituição da República Federativa do Brasil de 1988. Brasília, DF: Presidência da República, 2016. -/- _______. Leis de Diretrizes e Bases da Educação Nacional. Lei 9394/1996. Brasília, 2005. -/- _______. Ministério da Educação e do Desporto. Secretaria de Educação Fundamental. Referencial Curricular Nacional para a Educação Infantil. Brasília: MEC/SEF, 1998. -/- FREIRE, P. Pedagogia do oprimido. 17ª ed. São Paulo: Paz e Terra, 1983. -/- KUHLMANN JR., M.. Educando a infância brasileira. In: LOPES, E. M. T.; FILHO, L. M. F.; VEIGA, C. G. (Org.). 500 anos de educação no Brasil. 4ªed. Belo Horizonte: Autêntica, 2008. -/- LEÃO, J. L. de S. Educação Infantil no Brasil: Algumas Considerações. In: LEÃO, J. L. de S. O processo de inclusão escolar na educação infantil sob a ótica de assessoras pedagógicas da Secretaria Municipal de Educação do Natal/RN. 2008. Trabalho de conclusão de curso (Licenciatura em Pedagogia) – Centro de Educação, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 2018. p. 18. (shrink)
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  32. Hillel and Confucius: The Prescriptive Formulation of the Golden Rule in the Jewish and Chinese Confucian Ethical Traditions.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2003 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):29-41.
    In this article, the Golden Rule, a central ethical value to both Judaism and Confucianism, is evaluated in its prescriptive and proscriptive sentential formulations. Contrary to the (...)
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  33. A Pesquisa Científica E a Psicologia.Michel Foucault & Marcio Miotto - Tradutor - 2010 - Espaço Michel Foucault.
    As múltiplas psicologias que pretendem descrever o homem dão a impressão de ser tentativas desordenadas. Elas pretendem se construir a partir das estruturas biológicas e reduzem seu (...)
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  34. Principles, Virtues, or Detachment? Some Appreciative Reflections on Karen Stohrs On Manners.Bryan Van Norden - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (2):227-239.
    Karen Stohrs book On Manners argues persuasively that rules of etiquette, though conventional, play an essential moral role, because theyserve as vehicles through which we (...)express important moral values like respect and consideration for the needs, ideas, and opinions of others”. Stohr frequently invokes Kantian concepts and principles in order to make her point. In Part 2 of this essay, I shall argue that the significance of etiquette is better understood using a virtue ethics framework, like that of Confucianism, rather than the language of Kantianism. Within the Chinese tradition, Daoists have frequently been critics of Confucian ritualism. Consequently, in Part 3, I shall consider some possible Daoist critiques of Stohrs work. (shrink)
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  35. Snakes and Dragons, Rats Liver and Flys Leg: The Butterfly Dream Revisited.Robert E. Allinson - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (4):513-520.
    The Zhuangzi begins with Peng, a soaring bird transformed from a bounded fish, which is the first metaphor that points beyond limited standpoints to a higher point (...)
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  36. The Nonduality of Motion and Rest: Sengzhao on the Change of Things.Chien-Hsing Ho - 2018 - In Youru Charlie Wang & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.), Dao Companion to Chinese Buddhist Philosophy. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 175-188.
    In his essayThings Do Not Move,” Sengzhao (374?−414 CE), a prominent Chinese Buddhist philosopher, argues for the thesis that the myriad things do not move (...)in time. This view is counter-intuitive and seems to run counter to the Mahayana Buddhist doctrine of emptiness. In this book chapter, I assess Sengzhaos arguments for his thesis, elucidate his stance on the change/nonchange of things, and discuss related problems. I argue that although Sengzhao is keen on showing the plausibility of the thesis, he actually views the myriad things as both changing and unchanging and upholds the nonduality of motion and rest. In fact, the nonmoving thesis follows from the discernment that things change from moment to moment without there being any enduring stuff in the process. Among philosophical works that confer a higher ontological status on nonchange over change, Sengzhaos essay is unique and well worth pondering. (shrink)
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  37.  6
    Kantian Theocracy as a Non-Political Path to the Politics of Peace.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2016 - Jian Dao 46 (July):155-175.
    Kant is often regarded as one of the founding fathers of modern liberal democracy. His political theory reaches its climax in the ground-breaking work, Perpetual Peace ( (...)1795), which sets out the basic framework for a world federation of states united by a system of international law. What is less well known is that two years earlier, in his Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason (1793/1794), Kant had postulated a very different, explicitly religious path to the politics of peace: he presents the idea of anethical communityas a necessary requirement for humanity to becomesatisfactory to God”. While many recent scholars have noted the importance of Kants concept of the ethical community, few recognize the force of his argument that such a community is possible only if it takes the form of a church; as a result, the precise status of his proposal remains unclear and under-appreciated. He argues in Division One, Section IV, of Religions Third Piece that the idea of this community can become a reality only through achurchthat is characterized by four rational requirements: unity, integrity, freedom, and the changeability of all church rules except these four unchangeable marks. Prior to Section IV, Division One portrays this ethical community as having a political form, yet an essentially nonpolitical matter. He compares it with Jewish theocracy, but observes that the latter failed to be an ethical commonwealth because it was explicitly political. Whereas traditional theocracy replaces the political state of nature (which conforms to the law, “might makes right”) with an ethical state of nature (which conforms to the law that I call, “should makes good”), or attempts to synthesize them, non-coercive theocracy transcends this distinction through a new perspective: it unites humanity in a common vision of a divine legislator whose only law is inward, binding church members together like families, through the law of love. Whereas the legal rights supported by democracy and a system of international law can go a long way to prepare for world peace, Kants conviction is that it will be ultimately impossible without support from healthy religion. (shrink)
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  38.  11
    Ren: An Exemplary Life.Karyn L. Lai - 2014 - In Amy Olberding (ed.), Dao Companion to the Analects. Springer. pp. 83-94.
    This chapter discusses ren , a major term in the Confucian Analects. It analyzes the range of meanings of ren across different conversations, paying special attention to (...)
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  39.  66
    Confucian Social Media: An Oxymoron?Pak-Hang Wong - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (3):283-296.
    International observers and critics often attack China's Internet policy on the basis of liberal values. If China's Internet is designed and built on Confucian values that (...) are distinct from, and sometimes incompatible to, liberal values, then the liberalist critique ought to be reconsidered. In this respect, Mary Bockover'sConfucian Values and the Internet: A Potential Conflictappears to be the most direct attempt to address this issue. Yet, in light of developments since its publication in 2003, it is time to re-examine this issue. In this paper, I revisit Bockovers argument and show why it fails. Using social media as an example, I offer an alternative argument to show why the Internet remains largely incompatible with Confucian values. I end this paper by suggesting how to recontextualise the Confucian way of life and to redesign social media in accordance to Confucian values in the information society. (shrink)
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  40. Islamic Ethics and the Controversy About the Moral Heart of Confucianism.Mohammad Ashraf Adeel - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (2):151-156.
    This essay briefly evaluates the ongoing controversy between LIU Qingping and GUO Qiyong (and their followers) about themoral heartof Confucianism in order to draw acomparison (...)
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  41. Han Fei's Enlightened Ruler.Alejandro Bárcenas - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (3):236-259.
    In this essay I revise, based on the notion of theenlightened ruleror mingzhu and his critique of the literati of his time, the common belief (...)
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  42. Is Xunzis Virtue Ethics Susceptible to the Problem of Alienation?James Harold - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):71-84.
    In this essay I argue that if Kantian and consequentialist ethical theories are vulnerable to the so-calledproblem of alienation,” a virtue ethics based on Xunzis (...) ethical writings will also be vulnerable to this problem. I outline the problem of alienation, and then show that the role of ritual ( li ) in Xunzis theory renders his view susceptible to the problem as it has been traditionally understood. I consider some replies on Xunzis behalf, and also discuss whether the problem affects other Confucian and eudaimonian approaches to virtue ethics. I close by considering some solutions to the problem and the affect that this result has on the argumentative dialectic between the three major ethical traditions. (shrink)
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  43. Desacordo.Teresa Marques - 2015 - Compêndio Em Linha de Problemas de Filosofia Analítica.
    Discordamos sobre todo o tipo de coisas: o que existe, como as coisas funcionam, o que fazer, de que gostamos, etc. Entre os vários tipos de desacordo (...)
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  44. Zhu Xis Spiritual Practice as the Basis of His Central Philosophical Concepts.Joseph A. Adler - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):57-79.
    The argument is that (1) the spiritual crisis that Zhu Xi discussed with Zhang Shi 張栻 (11331180) and the othergentlemen of Hunanfrom about 1167 (...)to 1169, which was resolved by an understanding of what we might call the interpenetration of the mind’s stillness and activity (dong-jing 動靜) or equilibrium and harmony (zhong-he 中和), (2) led directly to his realization that Zhou Dunyi’s thought provided a cosmological basis for that resolution, and (3) this in turn led Zhu Xi to understand (or construct) the meaning of taiji in terms of the polarity of yin and yang; i.e. the Supreme Polarity as the most fundamental ordering principle (li 理). (shrink)
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  45.  74
    Paradoxical Language in Chan Buddhism.Chien-Hsing Ho - 2020 - In Yiu-Ming Fung (ed.), Dao Companion to Chinese Philosophy of Logic. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 389-404.
    Chinese Chan or Zen Buddhism is renowned for its improvisational, atypical, and perplexing use of words. In particular, the traditions encounter dialogues, which took place between (...)Chan masters and their interlocutors, abound in puzzling, astonishing, and paradoxical ways of speaking. In this chapter, we are concerned with Chans use of paradoxical language. In philosophical parlance, a linguistic paradox comprises the confluence of opposite or incongruent concepts in a way that runs counter to our common sense and ordinary rational thinking. One naturally wonders about Chan mastersrationales for their use of paradox. There are also concerns about whether the use violates the logical principle of noncontradiction to the effect that nothing can be both P and not-P all over in the same way at the same time. Chan became a viable Chinese Buddhist tradition during the Tang dynasty (618907) and continued to develop for several centuries. The tradition had produced a huge literature; consequently, our investigation of its use of paradox cannot but be limited and selective. In the second section, I first sketch key ideas of Chan that are pertinent to our investigation and then examine the use of paradox in the sermons associated with certain Tang masters of the southern Chan. In the third section, I analyze the presence of paradoxical language in post-Tang encounter dialogues. The fourth section concludes. (shrink)
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  46.  98
    Emptiness and Experience: Pure and Impure.John W. M. Krummel - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (1):57-76.
    This paper discusses the idea of "pure experience" within the context of the Buddhist tradition and in connection with the notions of emptiness and dependent origination (...) via a reading of Dale Wright's reading of 'Huangbo' in his 'Philosophical Meditations on Zen Buddhism'. The purpose is to appropriate Wright's text in order to engender a response to Steven Katz's contextualist-constructivist thesis that there are no "pure" (i.e., unmediated) experiences. In light of the Mahayana claim that everything is empty of substance, i.e., originates dependently through conditions, contingencies, and contexts, what does the "purity" of the Enlightenment experience mean for Chan/Zen Buddhism? (shrink)
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  47. Fraser, Chris, Dan Robins, and Timothy OLeary, Eds., Ethics in Early China: Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2011, Xvi+312 Pages[REVIEW]Bryan Van Norden - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (3):393-398.
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  48.  19
    Muller, A. Charles, Koreas Great Buddhist-Confucian Debate: The Treatises of Chong Tojon and Hamho Tuktong : Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2015, 181 Pages[REVIEW]Eric Nelson - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (1):133-137.
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  49.  47
    Kelleher, M. Theresa, Trans., The Journal of Wu Yubi: The Path to Sagehood[REVIEW]Bryan Norden - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (3):459-462.
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  50. Sim, May, Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius[REVIEW]Bryan Van Norden - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (1):109-111.
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