Results for 'historian'

407 found
Order:
  1. Why historians (and everyone else) should care about counterfactuals.Daniel Nolan - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 163 (2):317-335.
    Abstract There are at least eight good reasons practicing historians should concern themselves with counterfactual claims. Furthermore, four of these reasons do not even require that we are able to tell which historical counterfactuals are true and which are false. This paper defends the claim that these reasons to be concerned with counterfactuals are good ones, and discusses how each can contribute to the practice of history. Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-19 DOI 10.1007/s11098-011-9817-z Authors Daniel Nolan, School of Philosophy, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  2. The Historian of Philosophy as a "Portraitmaler": A Brentanian look on the Contextualism-Appropriationism Debate.Gabriel Ferreira - 2022 - Síntese: Revista de Filosofia 49 (155):559-578.
    In 2019, Christia Mercer has published a paper in which she does a reassessment of the 2015 debate between Garber and Della Rocca on what would be the correct interpretation of Spinoza. Following Mercer, the two philosophers instantiated two main positions regarding the concept and the methodology of doing history of philosophy, namely, contextualism and appropriationism. As Mercer puts it, it is pivoted around the acceptance or rejection of one single principle, i.e. the "Getting Things right Constraint" (GTRC) which can (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Is There an Ethics for Historians?Alan Tapper - 2009 - Studies in Western Australian History 26:16-36.
    How should historians treat one another? More generally, what are the ethical obligations that go with belonging to the profession of history? And more generally still, in what ways and in what sense is history a profession and how are professional ethics manifested in the profession? These are the questions I will canvass in this essay. In his introduction to The Historian’s Conscience, Stuart Macintyre observes that in the recent ‘public dispute over Australian history … there is surprisingly little (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. A historian's view of holography.Sean F. Johnston - 2008 - In H. J. Caulfield & L. Vikram (eds.), New Directions in Holography and Speckle. New York, NY, USA: pp. 3-15.
    On problems and assumptions in the historiography of holography for distinctive social groups engaged in the practice.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Computer verification for historians of philosophy.Landon D. C. Elkind - 2022 - Synthese 200 (3):1-28.
    Interactive theorem provers might seem particularly impractical in the history of philosophy. Journal articles in this discipline are generally not formalized. Interactive theorem provers involve a learning curve for which the payoffs might seem minimal. In this article I argue that interactive theorem provers have already demonstrated their potential as a useful tool for historians of philosophy; I do this by highlighting examples of work where this has already been done. Further, I argue that interactive theorem provers can continue to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. An Eminent Sikh Historian and Profound Scholar of Religion - Dr. Balwant Singh Dhillon.Devinder Pal Singh - 2021 - Sikh Philosophy Network.
    Prof. (Dr.) Balwant Singh Dhillon, a much-acclaimed Sikh-historian, a dedicated researcher, a prolific writer, and a profound scholar of religion, was born in 1950, at Village Ran Singh Wala, District Faridkot, Punjab, India. With his keen interest in learning, he received a B.A. degree from SGGS College, Chandigarh, in 1972, and an M.A. (History) degree from the University of Rajasthan, Jaipur in 1974. During his younger days, he nurtured a keen interest in sports. On attaining the National Level Athlete (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. As a Historian of Religions Poet Asaf Hâlet Çelebi and Religious Motives in Poetry.Necati SÜMER - 2019 - Mevzu - Journal of Social Sciences (2):129-166.
    Asaf Halet Çelebi, who is a poet interested in Eastern religions. This is due to reach the family atmosphere, the love to know different languages and mysticism. What makes him different aspects of Turkish literature, the history of religions is the masterful use of motifs in his poems. Religions, mythology, mysticism and music information about the poet, his poetry reflects this versatility. Sound in poetry, harmony, knowledge, symbols, and images of compliance on this issue reveals the talent of the poet. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Method and meaning: Ranke and droysen on the historian's disciplinary ethos.Katherina Kinzel - 2020 - History and Theory 59 (1):22-41.
    In this paper I revisit nineteenth-century debates over historical objectivity and the political functions of historiography. I focus on two central contributors to these debates: Leopold von Ranke and Johann Gustav Droysen. In their takes on objectivity and subjectivity, impartiality and political engagement I reveal diametrically opposed solutions to shared concerns: how can historians reveal history to be meaningful without taking recourse to speculative philosophy? And how can they produce a knowledge that is relevant to the present when the project (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Professor J. S. Grewal : An Eminent Historian Remembered.Devinder Pal Singh & Bhai Harbans Lal - 2022 - The Sikh Review, Kolkata, WB, India 70 (10):68-70.
    Professor Jagtar Singh Grewal, an eminent historian, had a pioneering interest in the historiography of medieval India. He brought the rich history of Punjab and Sikhs from the margins to the mainstream. His outstanding research works took Amritsar's name to national and international levels. Grewal, a retired national fellow of the Indian Council of Historical Research, used to say: "To understand the present, it's important to understand the past." .
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Mathematical skepticism: a sketch with historian in foreground.Luciano Floridi - 1998 - In J. van der Zande & R. Popkin (eds.), The Skeptical Tradition around 1800. pp. 41–60.
    We know very little about mathematical skepticism in modem times. Imre Lakatos once remarked that “in discussing modem efforts to establish foundations for mathematical knowledge one tends to forget that these are but a chapter in the great effort to overcome skepticism by establishing foundations for knowledge in general." And in a sense he was clearly right: modem thought — with its new discoveries in mathematical sciences, the mathematization of physics, the spreading of Pyrrhonist doctrines, the centrality of epistemological foundationalism (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11. What Is A Chemical Element? A Collection of Essays by Chemists, Philosophers, Historians, and Educators. Edited by Eric Scerri and Elena Ghibaudi. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2020, 312 pp. ISBN: 9780190933784, £65.00. [REVIEW]Pieter Thyssen - 2023 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science (3-4):1-4.
    Compared to its sister disciplines—philosophy of physics and philosophy of biology—philosophy of chemistry remains a relatively young field of philosophical endeavour. Having originated in the late...
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Russell and Husserl (1905–1918): The Not-So-Odd Couple.Nikolay Milkov - 2016 - In Peter Stone (ed.), Bertrand Russell’s Life and Legacy. Wilmington, Delaware, United States: Vernon Press. pp. 73-96.
    Historians of philosophy commonly regard as antipodal Bertrand Russell and Edmund Husserl, the founding fathers of analytic philosophy and phenomenology. This paper, however, establishes that during a formative phase in both of their careers Russell and Husserl shared a range of seminal ideas. In particular, the essay adduces clear cases of family resemblance between Husserl’s and Russell’s philosophy during their middle period, which spanned the years 1905 through 1918. The paper thus challenges the received view of Husserl’s relation to early (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. De la historia del arte como posibilidad actual del humanismo en Julius von Schlosser y Giulio Carlo Argan.Carlos Vanegas - 2014 - Co-herencia (20):79-98.
    The complex world of thought and sensitivity in the sphere of contemporary art has entailed the revision and exclusion of disciplines aimed at providing a model to explain and conceptualize reality. Art history, as one such discipline, has had many of its contributions questioned from Gombrich’s epistemological reformulation to the postmodern discourses, which extol the death of the author, the post-structuralist idea of tradition as a textual phenomenon, and the declaration of the death of history as a consequence of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Diagrams of the past: How timelines can aid the growth of historical knowledge.Marc Champagne - 2016 - Cognitive Semiotics 9 (1):11-44.
    Historians occasionally use timelines, but many seem to regard such signs merely as ways of visually summarizing results that are presumably better expressed in prose. Challenging this language-centered view, I suggest that timelines might assist the generation of novel historical insights. To show this, I begin by looking at studies confirming the cognitive benefits of diagrams like timelines. I then try to survey the remarkable diversity of timelines by analyzing actual examples. Finally, having conveyed this (mostly untapped) potential, I argue (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  15.  88
    A fourth solution to a Victorian anthropology paradox: underdeterminism.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    Historian of anthropology George Stocking tells us: from the point of view of parts of the Victorian middle class, Victorian society was highly evolved yet also contained savage components. Why don’t they change their ways, or why didn’t they? There is a Quinean solution.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Animism and Natural Teleology from Avicenna to Boyle.Jeff Kochan - 2021 - Science in Context 34 (1):1-23.
    Historians have claimed that the two closely related concepts of animism and natural teleology were both decisively rejected in the Scientific Revolution. They tout Robert Boyle as an early modern warden against pre-modern animism. Discussing Avicenna, Aquinas, and Buridan, as well as Renaissance psychology, I instead suggest that teleology went through a slow and uneven process of rationalization. As Neoplatonic theology gained influence over Aristotelian natural philosophy, the meaning of animism likewise grew obscure. Boyle, as some historians have shown, exemplifies (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  17. The Birth of Information in the Brain: Edgar Adrian and the Vacuum Tube.Justin Garson - 2015 - Science in Context 28 (1):31-52.
    As historian Henning Schmidgen notes, the scientific study of the nervous system would have been “unthinkable” without the industrialization of communication in the 1830s. Historians have investigated extensively the way nerve physiologists have borrowed concepts and tools from the field of communications, particularly regarding the nineteenth-century work of figures like Helmholtz and in the American Cold War Era. The following focuses specifically on the interwar research of the Cambridge physiologist Edgar Douglas Adrian, and on the technology that led to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  18. Entitled Art: What Makes Titles Names?Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (3):437-450.
    Art historians and philosophers often talk about the interpretive significance of titles, but few have bothered with their historical origins. This omission has led to the assumption that an artwork's title is its proper name, since names and titles share the essential function of facilitating reference to their bearers. But a closer look at the development of our titling practices shows a significant point of divergence from standard analyses of proper names: the semantic content of a title is often crucial (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19. Scholastic Clues in Two Latin Fencing Manuals Bridging the gap between medieval and renaissance cultures.Hélène Leblanc & Franck Cinato - 2023 - Acta Periodica Duellatorum 11 (1):39-63.
    Intellectual historians have rarely attended to the genre of fighting manuals, but these provide a new window on long-debated questions such as the relationship between Scholasticism and Humanism. This article offers a close comparison of the first known fencing manual, the 14-th century Liber de Arte Dimicatoria (Leeds, Royal Armouries FECHT 1, previously and better known as MS I.33), and the corpus of fighting manuals which underwent a remarkable expansion during the 15th and 16th centuries. While the former clearly shows (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. The Reception of Relativity in American Philosophy.Sander Verhaegh - forthcoming - Philosophy of Science.
    Historians have shown that philosophical discussions about the implications of relativity significantly shaped the development of European philosophy of science in the 1920s. Yet little is known about American debates from this period. This paper maps the first responses to Einstein’s theory in three U.S. philosophy journals and situates these papers within the local intellectual climate. We argue that these discussions (1) stimulated the development of a distinctly American branch of philosophy of science and (2) paved the way for the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Lotze and the Early Cambridge Analytic Philosophy.Nikolay Milkov - 2000 - Prima Philosophia 13:133-53.
    Many historians of analytic philosophy consider the early philosophy of Moore, Russell and Wittgenstein as much more neo-Hegelian as once believed. At the same time, the authors who closely investigate Green, Bradley and Bosanquet find out that these have little in common with Hegel. The thesis advanced in this chapter is that what the British (ill-named) neo-Hegelians brought to the early analytic philosophers were, above all, some ideas of Lotze, not of Hegel. This is true regarding: (i) Lotze’s logical approach (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  22. Is Brentano's Method a Unifying Element of the Brentano School?Wolfgang Huemer - 2019 - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica (4):897-910.
    Among historians of philosophy it is often taken for granted that the “Brentano school” was one of the influential philosophical movements at the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth century – but Brentano’s own contributions are often eclipsed by that of his direct students. This invites to reflect on the nature of and the unity within the school. Since Brentano’s conception of a rigorous, scientific philosophy had a strong impact on his students, it has been argued (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Confidence, Humility, and Hubris in Nineteenth Century Philosophies.Ian James Kidd - 2017 - In Herman Paul & Jeroen van Dongen (eds.), Epistemic Virtues in the Sciences and the Humanities. Springer Verlag. pp. 11-25.
    Most historians explains changes in conceptions of the epistemic virtues and vices in terms of social and historical developments. I argue that such approaches, valuable as they are, neglect the fact that certain changes also reflect changes in metaphysical sensibilities. Certain epistemic virtues and vices are defined relative to an estimate of our epistemic situation that is, in turn, defined by a broader vision or picture of the nature of reality. I defend this claim by charting changing conceptions of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Cross-cultural Research, Evolutionary Psychology, and Racialism: Problems and Prospects. Jackson Jr - 2016 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 8 (20160629).
    This essay is a defense of the social construction of racialism. I follow a standard definition of “racialism” which is the belief that “there are heritable characteristics, possessed by members of our species, that allow us to divide them into a small set of races, in such a way that all the members of these races share certain traits and tendencies with each other that they do not share with other members of any other race”. In particular I want to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Can a Darwinian Be a Christian?Gregory W. Dawes - 2007 - Religion Compass 1 (6):711-24.
    A number of recent historians claim to have defeated what they call the ‘conflict thesis’, the idea that there exists some inevitable conflict between Darwinism and Christianity. This is often thought to be part of a broader ‘warfare thesis’, which posits an inevitable conflict between science and religion. But, all they have defeated is one, relatively uninteresting form of this thesis. There remain other forms of the conflict theses that remain entirely plausible, even in light of the historical record.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. Panofsky - Warburg - Cassirer. From Iconology to Image Science.Martina Sauer - 2020 - In Homo Pictor. Image Studies and Archaeology in Dialogue [Freiburger Studien zur Archäologie & Visuellen Kultur 2], ed. by Jacobus Bracker, Heidelberg: Propylaeum. pp. 159-171.
    Neither the art historians Panofsky and Warburg nor the philosopher Cassirer had any interest with their cultural-historical research in fact-based, historical questions. An approach that had become common in the 19th century due to the loss of validity of the speculative aesthetics. On the contrary, instead of this substantial understanding as the documentary concept represents, these researchers focused on a functional understanding of art historical sources. Nevertheless, in contrast to this starting point, Panofsky invented a methodological procedure, the so-called iconological (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. A Game-Theoretic Analysis of the Waterloo Campaign and Some Comments on the Analytic Narrative Project.Philippe Mongin - 2018 - Cliometrica 12:451–480.
    The paper has a twofold aim. On the one hand, it provides what appears to be the first game-theoretic modeling of Napoleon’s last campaign, which ended dramatically on 18 June 1815 at Waterloo. It is specifically concerned with the decision Napoleon made on 17 June 1815 to detach part of his army against the Prussians he had defeated, though not destroyed, on 16 June at Ligny. Military historians agree that this decision was crucial but disagree about whether it was rational. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28. “Putnam, James, and ‘Absolute’ Truth”.Jackman Henry - 2021 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 13 (2).
    While historians of pragmatism often present William James as the founder of the “subjectivist” wing of pragmatism that came back into prominence with the writings of Richard Rorty, Hilary Putnam has argued that James’s views are actually much closer to Peirce’s (and Putnam’s own). Putnam does so by noting that James distinguishes two sorts of truth: “temporary truth,” which is closer to a subjective notion of warranted assertibility, and “absolute truth,” which is closer to Peirce’s own comparatively objective notion of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Kevin C. Armitage, The Nature Study Movement: The Forgotten Popularizer of America's Conservation Ethic[REVIEW]Shane Ralston - 2011 - Environmental Ethics 33 (4):437-440.
    Environmental historian Kevin Armitage’s new book offers welcome relief to readers grown weary of anthropocentrism versus nonanthropecentrism debates and Muir-Pinchot-Leopold “third way” arguments. It will also find a receptive audience among those who have maintained all along that education is the key to addressing our environmental woes. In the United States, environmental education has a vibrant history. During the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, a critical mass of policy makers, educators, scientists, and philosophers shared the belief that a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. The Revolution of 1917 — the 1920s and the History of Social and Political Thought from Ivan Lysiak-Rudnytsky’s Perspective.Serhii Yosypenko - 2017 - Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 4:53-66.
    Prominent Ukrainian historian Ivan Lysiak-Rudnytsky (1919–1984) repeatedly addressed the topic of the Ukrainian revolution of 1917 – the 1920s, especially considering its intellectual origins and implications in the context of the history of Ukrainian social and political thought. Analysis of his works shows the manner in which the Ukrainian revolution as an event structures the history of Ukrainian social and political thought in both senses of the term “history”: as history itself and as its historiography. Based on this analysis, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Towards a Computational History of Ideas.Arianna Betti & Hein Van Den Berg - 2016 - Proceedings of the Third Conference on Digital Humanities in Luxembourg with a Special Focus on Reading Historical Sources in the Digital Age: Luxembourg. Ceur Workshop Proceedings, 1681.
    The History of Ideas is presently enjoying a certain renaissance after a long period of disrepute. Increasing quantities of digitally available historical texts and the availability of computational tools for the exploration of such masses of sources, it is suggested, can be of invaluable help to historians of ideas. The question is: how exactly? In this paper, we argue that a computational history of ideas is possible if the following two conditions are satisfied: (i) Sound Method . A computational history (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  32. Political and religious ideas during the Irish Revolution.Richard Bourke - 2020 - History of European Ideas 46 (7):997-1008.
    ABSTRACT Intellectual historians have tended to focus either on shifts in sensibility or, more analytically, on the substance and structure of thought. They might usefully, however, examine both, as well as the reciprocal action of the one upon the other. This applies equally to political and religious ideas. In early twentieth-century Ireland, it was the relationship between religion and politics that stirred controversy. How would the institutions of church and state function, respectively, under Home Rule and the Union. Opposing camps (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. The the Far Reaches: Phenomenology, Ethics, and Social Renewal in Central Europe.Michael Gubser - 2014 - Stanford, California: Stanford University Press.
    When future historians chronicle the twentieth century, they will see phenomenology as one of the preeminent social and ethical philosophies of its age. The phenomenological movement not only produced systematic reflection on common moral concerns such as distinguishing right from wrong and explaining the status of values; it also called on philosophy to renew European societies facing crisis, an aim that inspired thinkers in interwar Europe as well as later communist bloc dissidents. Despite this legacy, phenomenology continues to be largely (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  34. Analytic Narratives: What they are and how they contribute to historical explanation.Philippe Mongin - 2019 - In Claude Diebolt & Michael Haupert (eds.), Handbook of Cliometrics. Springer.
    The expression "analytic narratives" is used to refer to a range of quite recent studies that lie on the boundaries between history, political science, and economics. These studies purport to explain specific historical events by combining the usual narrative approach of historians with the analytic tools that economists and political scientists draw from formal rational choice theories. Game theory, especially of the extensive form version, is currently prominent among these tools, but there is nothing inevitable about such a technical choice. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. Scott Lidgard and Lynn K. Nyhart, eds. Biological Individuality: Integrating Scientific, Philosophical, and Historical Perspectives. [REVIEW]Catherine Kendig - 2018 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 8 (2):475-480.
    Biologists, historians of biology, and philosophers of biology often ask what is it to be an individual, really. This book does not answer that question. Instead, it answers a much more interesting one: How do biologists individuate individuals? In answering that question, the authors explore why biologists individuate individuals, in what ways, and for what purposes. The cross-disciplinary, dialogical approach to answering metaphysical questions that is pursued in the volume may seem strange to metaphysicians who are not biologically focused, but (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Pragmatism without Progress: Affect and Temporality in William James’s Philosophy of Hope.Bonnie Sheehey - 2019 - Contemporary Pragmatism 16 (1):40-64.
    Philosophers and intellectual historians generally recognize pragmatism as a philosophy of progress. For many commentators, pragmatism is tied to a notion of progress through its embrace of meliorism – a forward-looking philosophy that places hope in the future as a site of possibility and improvement. I complicate the progressive image of hope generally attributed to pragmatism by outlining an alternative account of meliorism in the work of William James. By focusing on the affectivity and temporality of James’s meliorism, I argue (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. “Spinoza’s Respublica divina:” in Otfried Höffe (ed.), Baruch de Spinozas Tractatus theologico-politicus (Berlin: Akademie Verlag (Klassiker Aulegen), forthcoming).Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2013 - In Otfried Höffe (ed.), Baruch de Spinozas Tractatus theologico-politicus. Akademie Verlag (Klassiker Aulegen). pp. 177-192.
    Chapters 17 and 18 of the TTP constitute a textual unit in which Spinoza submits the case of the ancient Hebrew state to close examination. This is not the work of a historian, at least not in any sense that we, twenty-first century readers, would recognize as such. Many of Spinoza’s claims in these chapters are highly speculative, and seem to be poorly backed by historical evidence. Other claims are broad-brush, ahistorical generalizations: for example, in a marginal note, Spinoza (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Marriage and its Limits.Daniel Nolan - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    Marriages come in a very wide variety: if the reports of anthropologists and historians are to be believed, an extraordinarily wide variety. This includes some of the more unusual forms, including marriage to the dead; to the gods; and even to plants. This does suggest that few proposed marriage relationships would require 'redefining marriage': but on the other hand, it makes giving a general theory of marriage challenging. So one issue we should face is how accepting we should be of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. Possession, exorcism and psychoanalysis.N. Tosh - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33 (4):583-596.
    This paper investigates the historiographical utility of psychoanalysis, focussing in particular on retrospective explanations of demonic possession and exorcism. It is argued that while 'full-blown' psychoanalytic explanations-those that impose Oedipus complexes, anal eroticism or other sophisticated theoretical structures on the historical actors-may be vulnerable to the charge of anachronism, a weaker form of retrospective psychoanalysis can be defended as a legitimate historical lens. The paper concludes, however, by urging historians to look at psychoanalysis as well as trying to look through (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  40. Philosophy of Science and History of Science: A Productive Engagement.Eric Palmer - 1991 - Dissertation, University of California, San Diego
    Philosophy of science and history of science both have a significant relation to science itself; but what is their relation to each other? That question has been a focal point of philosophical and historical work throughout the second half of this century. An analysis and review of the progress made in dealing with this question, and especially that made in philosophy, is the focus of this thesis. Chapter one concerns logical positivist and empiricist approaches to philosophy of science, and the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. "Honor" (entry for Encyclopedia of Heroism Studies).Dan Demetriou - 2023 - Encyclopedia of Heroism Studies.
    Such a bewildering and contradictory welter of behaviors and traits are connoted by “honor” and its best equivalents in other languages that analyses of the concept have daunted philosophers, anthropologists, sociologists, political scientists, historians, and literary scholars for millennia. Is it an external good given — and revoked just as easily — by others? Or does “honor” name an inner good that’s absolutely in our control: our integrity, our very commitment to right conduct? Is honor a central moral virtue — (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Enlightenment and Formal Romanticism - Carnap’s Account of Philosophy as Explication.Thomas Mormann - 2010 - Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 14:263 - 329.
    Carnap and Twentieth-Century Thought: Explication as En lighten ment is the first book in the English language that seeks to place Carnap's philosophy in a broad cultural, political and intellectual context. According to the author, Carnap synthesized many different cur rents of thought and thereby arrived at a novel philosophical perspective that remains strik ing ly relevant today. Whether the reader agrees with Carus's bold theses on Carnap's place in the landscape of twentieth-century philosophy, and his even bolder claims concerning (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. The Essentialism of Early Modern Psychiatric Nosology.Hein van den Berg - 2023 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 45 (2):1-25.
    Are psychiatric disorders natural kinds? This question has received a lot of attention within present-day philosophy of psychiatry, where many authors debate the ontology and nature of mental disorders. Similarly, historians of psychiatry, dating back to Foucault, have debated whether psychiatric researchers conceived of mental disorders as natural kinds or not. However, historians of psychiatry have paid little to no attention to the influence of (a) theories within logic, and (b) theories within metaphysics on psychiatric accounts of proper method, and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Mathematization in Synthetic Biology: Analogies, Templates, and Fictions.Andrea Loettgers & Tarja Knuuttila - 2017 - In Martin Carrier & Johannes Lenhard (eds.), Mathematics as a Tool: Tracing New Roles of Mathematics in the Sciences. Springer Verlag.
    In his famous article “The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences” Eugen Wigner argues for a unique tie between mathematics and physics, invoking even religious language: “The miracle of the appropriateness of the language of mathematics for the formulation of the laws of physics is a wonderful gift which we neither understand nor deserve”. The possible existence of such a unique match between mathematics and physics has been extensively discussed by philosophers and historians of mathematics. Whatever the merits (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45. The Great Indian Revolt: A Short Deliberation.Paramita Acharjee - 2012 - Pratidhwani the Echo (I):89-94.
    A group of Indian Historians described the Revolt of 1857 as people’s revolt and regarded its leaders as national Hero’s. Further, some Indian and British Historians have termed the Revolt of 1857 as the ‘Mutiny of the Sepoys’. Opinion differs among the Historians as to the nature of the Great Revolt of 1857. I am trying to continue my brief discussion from this background in this essay.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Ontología y mundo externo en Berkeley / Berkeley's Ontology and the External World.Alberto Luis López - 2020 - Logos 135 (48):11-23.
    Readers and historians have often misunderstood Berkeley's philosophy by believing that he denies the existence of the external world. From which they conclude that his philosophy inevitably leads to solipsism. Faced with these readings, in this paper I discuss the relationship between ontology and the external world in Berkeley with the aim of clarifying some interpretative errors and showing three things: 1) that is a mistake to believe Berkeley’s philosophy eliminate the external world and lead to solipsism, 2) that his (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Theorica et Practica: Historical Epistemology and the Re-Visioning of Thirteenth and Fourteenth-Century Medicine.Brenda S. Gardenour - 2011 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 33 (1):83-110.
    Positivist medical historians, guided by the savoir of modern western biomedicine, have long depicted medieval medicine as an aberration along the continuum of scientific and medical progress. Historical epistemology, founded in the ideas of Cavailles, Foucault, Davidson, and Hacking, however, allows the historian to disrupt this false continuum and to unchain medieval medicine from modern medicine. Postmodernist approaches, such as those sourced in Lyotard, Barthes, and Derrida, allow the historian to further deconstruct medieval and modern medical discourse, revealing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. When will a Darwinian approach be useful for the study of society?Samuel Bagg - 2017 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 16 (3):259-281.
    In recent years, some have claimed that a Darwinian perspective will revolutionize the study of human society and culture. This project is viewed with disdain and suspicion, on the other hand, by many practicing social scientists. This article seeks to clear the air in this heated debate by dissociating two claims that are too often assumed to be inseparable. The first is the ‘ontological’ claim that Darwinian principles apply, at some level of abstraction, to human society and culture. The second (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  49. L’amicizia di una vita. Eugenio Garin (1909-2004) e Jacob Leib Teicher.Anna Teicher - 2019 - Noctua 6 (1–2):373-443.
    The philosopher and historian of Italian philosophy, Eugenio Garin, and Jacob Leib Teicher, the Polish Jewish student of Arabic and Jewish philosophy, met as students at the University of Florence, Italy, in the 1920s. They developed a life-long friendship based on their shared scholarly interests, and Garin credited Teicher with introducing him to medieval Arabic and Jewish philosophy. Teicher was forced to leave Florence as a result of the Italian racial legislation in 1938, settling in the UK where from (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Confucianism and ritual.Hagop Sarkissian - 2022 - In Jennifer Oldstone-Moore (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Confucianism. Oxford University Press.
    Confucian writings on ritual from the classical period (ca 8th-3rd centuries BCE), including instruction manuals, codes of conduct, and treatises on the origins and function of ritual in human life, are impressive in scope and repay careful engagement. These texts maintain that ritual participation fosters social and emotional development, helps persons deal with significant life events such as marriages and deaths, and helps resolve political disagreements. These early sources are of interest not only to historians and Sinologists, but also to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 407