Results for 'iPS Cells'

517 found
Order:
  1. Direct Reprogramming and Ethics in Stem Cell Research.W. Malcolm Byrnes - 2008 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 8 (2):277-290.
    The recent successful conversion of adult cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells through direct reprogramming opens a new chapter in the study of disease and the development of regenerative medicine. It also provides a historic opportunity to turn away from the ethically problematic use of embryonic stem cells isolated through the destruction of human embryos. Moreover, because iPS cells are patient specific, they render therapeutic cloning unnecessary. To maximize therapeutic benefit, adult stem cell research will (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. Comments on “Moral Complicity in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Research”.Byrnes W. Malcolm & J. Furton Edward - 2009 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):202-205.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Comments on “Moral Complicity in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Research”W. Malcolm Byrnes, Ph.D. and Edward J. FurtonIn his article titled “Moral Complicity in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Research,” Mark T. Brown (2009) unfortunately mischaracterizes my ethical analysis of the use of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for replacement therapies, or treatments (Byrnes 2008). In my paper, which Brown cites, I argue that, just as it is ethically acceptable (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Confessions of a" pro-life" Obama supporter.W. Malcolm Byrnes - 2009 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9 (2):241-244.
    The author supported Barack Obama for president, and he agrees with Obama on most issues. However, he opposes the federal funding of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research. Besides involving the destruction of human life, hESC research can (1) result in the exploitation of women, and (2) cause human reproduction to become a means to an end, i.e., human embryos will become commodities to be bought and sold. Recent scientific developments show the growing potential of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) (...) and the diminishing promise of their embryonic counterparts. When President Obama lifted restrictions on hESC research on March 9, 2009, he missed an opportunity to show moral leadership on a politically controversial issue. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Lived Experiences and Challenges Faced by Indigenous High School Students Amidst the New Normal of Education.Nina Bettina Buenaflor, Jocelyn Adiaton, Galilee Jordan Ancheta, Jericho Balading, Aileen Kaye Bulatao Bravo & Jhoselle Tus - 2023 - Psychology and Education: A Multidisciplinary Journal 7 (1):160-165.
    Indigenous people (IP) have faced multiple difficulties in education. Indigenous students often do worse academically than non-indigenous student peers. These stated the low enrollment rates showed a dropout rate, absenteeism, repetition rates, literacy rate, and thus the educational outcomes, with retention and completion being two significant issues. Further, this study explores the lived experiences and challenges faced by indigenous high school students amidst the new normal education. Employing the Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, the findings of this study were: (1) The reason (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. CONTRIBUȚIA IPS NESTOR VORNICESCU LA PROMOVAREA DIALOGULUI INTER-CREȘTIN ȘI INTER-RELIGIOS AVÂND ÎN CENTRU PROBLEMA PĂCII.Adrian Boldisor - 2014 - In Diac dr Ioniţă Apostolache (ed.), TEOLOGIE ŞI SLUJIRE PASTORALĂ ÎN VIAŢA ŞI OPERA MITROPOLIŢILOR FIRMILIAN MARIN ŞI NESTOR VORNICESCU. pp. 199-210.
    Volumul de articole, studii, cuvântări şi Pastorale publicat la Editura Mitropolia Olteniei din Craiova în anul 1986 trebuie văzut şi analizat, pentru o bună şi corectă înţelegere, în lumina vremurilor în care a apărut. În acelaşi timp, ideile pe care IPS Nestor Vornicescu, Arhiepiscopul Craiovei şi Mitropolitul Olteniei, le dezvoltă în scrierile sale sunt actuale şi după aproape 30 de ani de la strângerea lor între paginile aceleaşi cărţi, după ce văzuseră lumina tiparului cu ani în urmă în diferite reviste (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. IP Scoring Rules: Foundations and Applications.Jason Konek - 2019 - Proceedings of Machine Learning Research 103:256-264.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  7. The Cell and Protoplasm as Container, Object, and Substance, 1835–1861.Daniel Liu - 2017 - Journal of the History of Biology 50 (4):889-925.
    (Recipient of the 2020 Everett Mendelsohn Prize.) This article revisits the development of the protoplasm concept as it originally arose from critiques of the cell theory, and examines how the term “protoplasm” transformed from a botanical term of art in the 1840s to the so-called “living substance” and “the physical basis of life” two decades later. I show that there were two major shifts in biological materialism that needed to occur before protoplasm theory could be elevated to have equal status (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8. Stem Cell Lineages: Between Cell and Organism.Melinda Bonnie Fagan - 2017 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 9 (6).
    Ontologies of living things are increasingly grounded on the concepts and practices of current life science. Biological development is a process, undergone by living things, which begins with a single cell and (in an important class of cases) ends with formation of a multicellular organism. The process of development is thus prima facie central for ideas about biological individuality and organismality. However, recent accounts of these concepts do not engage developmental biology. This paper aims to fill the gap, proposing the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  9. Stem Cells and the Microenvironment: Reciprocity with Asymmetry in Regenerative Medicine.Militello Guglielmo & Bertolaso Marta - 2022 - Acta Biotheoretica 70 (4):1-27.
    Much of the current research in regenerative medicine concentrates on stem-cell therapy that exploits the regenerative capacities of stem cells when injected into different types of human tissues. Although new therapeutic paths have been opened up by induced pluripotent cells and human mesenchymal cells, the rate of success is still low and mainly due to the difficulties of managing cell proliferation and differentiation, giving rise to non-controlled stem cell differentiation that ultimately leads to cancer. Despite being still (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Stem Cell Research and Same Sex Reproduction.Thomas Douglas, Catherine Harding, Hannah Bourne & Julian Savulescu - 2012 - In Muireann Quigley, Sarah Chan & John Harris (eds.), Stem Cells: New Frontiers in Science and Ethics. World Scientific.
    Recent advances in stem cell research suggest that in the future it may be possible to create eggs and sperm from human stem cells through a process that we term in vitro gametogenesis (IVG). IVG would allow treatment of some currently untreatable forms of infertility. It may also allow same-sex couples to have genetically-related children. For example, cells taken from one man could potentially be used to create an egg, which could then be fertilised using naturally produced sperm (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11. Cell Types as Natural Kinds.Matthew H. Slater - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (2):170-179.
    Talk of different types of cells is commonplace in the biological sciences. We know a great deal, for example, about human muscle cells by studying the same type of cells in mice. Information about cell type is apparently largely projectible across species boundaries. But what defines cell type? Do cells come pre-packaged into different natural kinds? Philosophical attention to these questions has been extremely limited [see e.g., Wilson (Species: New Interdisciplinary Essays, pp 187–207, 1999; Genes and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  12. Diagnosis of Blood Cells Using Deep Learning.Ahmed J. Khalil & Samy S. Abu-Naser - 2022 - International Journal of Academic Engineering Research (IJAER) 6 (2):69-84.
    In computer science, Artificial Intelligence (AI), sometimes called machine intelligence, is intelligence demonstrated by machines, in contrast to the natural intelligence displayed by humans and other animals. Computer science defines AI research as the study of "intelligent agents": any device that perceives its environment and takes actions that maximize its chance of successfully achieving its goals. Deep Learning is a new field of research. One of the branches of Artificial Intelligence Science deals with the creation of theories and algorithms that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  13. Biological Atomism and Cell Theory.Daniel J. Nicholson - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (3):202-211.
    Biological atomism postulates that all life is composed of elementary and indivisible vital units. The activity of a living organism is thus conceived as the result of the activities and interactions of its elementary constituents, each of which individually already exhibits all the attributes proper to life. This paper surveys some of the key episodes in the history of biological atomism, and situates cell theory within this tradition. The atomistic foundations of cell theory are subsequently dissected and discussed, together with (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  14. Stem Cells Dependently Arising and Empty.Sun Kyeong Yu - 2020 - In Buddhism and Culture (Buddhist magazine in Korea). Seoul, South Korea:
    “Stem Cells Dependently Arising and Empty” May 2021, Buddhism and Culture (a Korean-language Buddhist magazine sponsored by the Foundation for the Promotion of Korean Buddhism), Korea.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. The Artificial Cell, the Semipermeable Membrane, and the Life that Never Was, 1864–1901.Daniel Liu - 2019 - Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences 49 (5):504-555.
    Since the early nineteenth century a membrane or wall has been central to the cell’s identity as the elementary unit of life. Yet the literally and metaphorically marginal status of the cell membrane made it the site of clashes over the definition of life and the proper way to study it. In this article I show how the modern cell membrane was conceived of by analogy to the first “artificial cell,” invented in 1864 by the chemist Moritz Traube (1826–1894), and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  16. Cancer cells and adaptive explanations.Pierre-Luc Germain - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (6):785-810.
    The aim of this paper is to assess the relevance of somatic evolution by natural selection to our understanding of cancer development. I do so in two steps. In the first part of the paper, I ask to what extent cancer cells meet the formal requirements for evolution by natural selection, relying on Godfrey-Smith’s (2009) framework of Darwinian populations. I argue that although they meet the minimal requirements for natural selection, cancer cells are not paradigmatic Darwinian populations. In (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  17. Is the Cell Really a Machine?Daniel J. Nicholson - 2019 - Journal of Theoretical Biology 477:108–126.
    It has become customary to conceptualize the living cell as an intricate piece of machinery, different to a man-made machine only in terms of its superior complexity. This familiar understanding grounds the conviction that a cell's organization can be explained reductionistically, as well as the idea that its molecular pathways can be construed as deterministic circuits. The machine conception of the cell owes a great deal of its success to the methods traditionally used in molecular biology. However, the recent introduction (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  18. Stem Cell Research on Embryonic Persons Is Just.Aaron Rizzieri - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):195-203.
    I argue that embryonic stem cell research is fair to the embryo, even on the assumption that the embryo has attained full personhood and an attendant right to life at conception. This is because the only feasible alternatives open to the embryo are to exist briefly in an unconscious state and be killed or to not exist at all. Hence, one is neither depriving the embryo of an enduring life it would otherwise have had nor is one causing the embryo (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. Fake cells and the aura of life: A philosophical diagnostic of synthetic life.Daphne Broeks, Yogi Hendlin & Hub Zwart - 2022 - Endeavour 46.
    Synthetic biology is often seen as the engineering turn in biology. Philosophically speaking, entities created by synthetic biology, from synthetic cells to xenobots, challenge the ontological divide between the organic and inorganic, as well as between the natural and the artificial. Entities such as synthetic cells can be seen as hybrid or transitory objects, or neo–things. However, what has remained philosophically underexplored so far is the impact these hybrid neo–things will have on (our phenomenological experience of) the living (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Do Somatic Cells Really Sacrifice Themselves? Why an Appeal to Coercion May be a Helpful Strategy in Explaining the Evolution of Multicellularity.Adrian Stencel & Javier Suárez - 2021 - Biological Theory 16 (2):102-113.
    An understanding of the factors behind the evolution of multicellularity is one of today’s frontiers in evolutionary biology. This is because multicellular organisms are made of one subset of cells with the capacity to transmit genes to the next generation and another subset responsible for maintaining the functionality of the organism, but incapable of transmitting genes to the next generation. The question arises: why do somatic cells sacrifice their lives for the sake of germline cells? How is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21. Somatic Cell Therapy: A Genetic Rescue for a Tattered Immune System?Bryn Williams-Jones - 2012 - BioéthiqueOnline 1:4.
    The case of Andrew Gobea, the first child to receive experimental gene therapy for SCID, and a reflection on the associated ethical implications of gene therapy research.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Emerging Next Generation Solar Cells Route to High Efficiency and Low Cost.Md Samiul Islam Sadek, Dr M. Junaebur Rashid & Dr Zahid Hasan Mahmood - 2017 - International Journal of Trend in Scientific Research and Development 1 (4):140-152.
    Generation of clean energy is one of the main challenges of the 21st century. Solar energy is the most abundantly available renewable energy source which would be supplying more than 50 of the global electricity demand in 2100. Solar cells are used to convert light energy into electrical energy directly with an appeal that it does not generate any harmful bi products, like greenhouse gasses. The manufacturing of solar cells is actually based on the types of semiconducting or (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. The Synthetic Cell as a Techno-scientific Mandala.H. A. E. Zwart - 2018 - International Journal of Jungian Studies 10.
    This paper analyses the technoscientific objective of building a synthetic cell from a Jungian perspective. After decades of fragmentation and specialisation, the synthetic cell symbolises a turn towards restored wholeness, both at the object pole and at the subject pole. From a Jungian perspective, it is no coincidence that visual representations of synthetic cells often reflect an archetypal, mandala-like structure. As a symbol of restored unity, the synthetic cell mandala compensates for technoscientific fragmentation via active imagination, providing a visual (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24. What is Mimicked by Biomimicry? Synthetic Cells as Exemplifications of the Threefold Biomimicry Paradox.Hub Zwart - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (5):527-549.
    This article addresses three paradoxes of biomimicry. First of all: how can biomimicry be as old as technology as such and at the same time decidedly innovative and new? Secondly: how can biomimicry both entail a 'naturalisation' of technology and a 'technification' of nature? And finally: how can biomimicry be perceived as nature-friendly but at the same time (potentially at least) as a pervasive biotechnological assault on nature? Contemporary (technoscientific) biomimicry, I will argue, aims to mimic nature at the level (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25. Struggle within: evolution and ecology of somatic cell populations.Bartlomiej Swiatczak - 2021 - Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences 78 (21):6797-6806.
    The extent to which normal (nonmalignant) cells of the body can evolve through mutation and selection during the lifetime of the organism has been a major unresolved issue in evolutionary and developmental studies. On the one hand, stable multicellular individuality seems to depend on genetic homogeneity and suppression of evolutionary conflicts at the cellular level. On the other hand, the example of clonal selection of lymphocytes indicates that certain forms of somatic mutation and selection are concordant with the organism-level (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Electromagnetic Radiation, a Living Cell and the Soul: A Collated Hypothesis.Contzen Pereira - 2015 - Neuroquantology 13 (4).
    The soul is believed to be an immortal essence of living things in scores of philosophical and religious traditions but sparsely understood by science. The word ‘soul’ does not have a scientific definition but through this paper is hypothesized to be an indefinite, non-structured, massless energy made up of electromagnetic radiations that is confined in the cytoskeletal network of the biological cell. Electromagnetic radiations continually interact with the biological cell and propagate within the cell; by a pathway known as ‘Cell-Soul (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27. Stem cells: biopsy on frozen embryos.Peter Schwartz - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (1):7.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. From primal scenes to synthetic cells.Hub Zwart - 2019 - eLife 8.
    Synthetic cells spark intriguing questions about the nature of life. Projects such as BaSyC (‘Building a Synthetic Cell’) aim to build an entity that mimics how living cells work from basic components. But what kind of entity would a synthetic cell really be? I assess this question from a philosophical perspective, and show how early fictional narratives of artificial life – such as the laboratory scene in Goethe’s Faust – can help us to understand the challenges faced by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  29. Biopower, Styles of Reasoning, and What's Still Missing from the Stem Cell Debates.Shelley Tremain - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (3):577 - 609.
    Until now, philosophical debate about human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research has largely been limited to its ethical dimensions and implications. Although the importance and urgency of these ethical debates should not be underestimated, the almost undivided attention that mainstream and feminist philosophers have paid to the ethical dimensions of hESC research suggests that the only philosophically interesting questions and concerns about it are by and large ethical in nature. My argument goes some distance to challenge the assumption that ethical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  30. An improved ontological representation of dendritic cells as a paradigm for all cell types.Masci Anna Maria, N. Arighi Cecilia, D. Diehl Alexander, E. Lieberman Anne, Mungall Chris, H. Scheuermann Richard, Barry Smith & G. Cowell Lindsay - 2009 - BMC Bioinformatics 10 (1):70.
    The Cell Ontology (CL) is designed to provide a standardized representation of cell types for data annotation. Currently, the CL employs multiple is_a relations, defining cell types in terms of histological, functional, and lineage properties, and the majority of definitions are written with sufficient generality to hold across multiple species. This approach limits the CL’s utility for cross-species data integration. To address this problem, we developed a method for the ontological representation of cells and applied this method to develop (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. The Lady Vanishes: What’s Missing from the Stem Cell Debate.Donna L. Dickenson - 2006 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1):43-54.
    Most opponents of somatic cell nuclear transfer and embryonic stem cell technologies base their arguments on the twin assertions that the embryo is either a human being or a potential human being, and that it is wrong to destroy a human being or potential human being in order to produce stem cell lines. Proponents’ justifications of stem cell research are more varied, but not enough to escape the charge of obsession with the status of the embryo. What unites the two (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  32. Wall-Window-Screen: How the Cell Phone Mediates a Worldview for Us.Galit Wellner - 2011 - Humanities and Technology Review 30:87-103.
    The article proposes to model the phenomenon of the cell phone as a wall-window. This model aims at explicating some of the perceptions and experiences associated with cellular technology. The wall-window model means that the cell phone simultaneously separates the user from the physical surroundings (the wall), and connects the user to a remote space (the window). The remote space may be where the interlocutor resides or where information is stored (e.g. the Internet). Most cell phone usage patterns are modeled (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  33. Skepticism About the “Convertibility” of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.Thomas V. Cunningham - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (1):40-42.
    No abstract available. First paragraph: In this issue’s target article, Stier and Schoene-Siefert purport to ‘depotentialize’ the argument from potentiality based on their claim that any human cell may be “converted” into a morally significant entity, and consequently, the argument from potentiality finally succumbs to a reductio ad absurdum. I aim to convey two reasons for skepticism about the innocuousness of the notion of cell convertibility, and hence, the cogency of their argument.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34. Human Inertia and Cell Phone Conversations.Rob van Gerwen - manuscript
    Cellular, or mobile phones are great: they allow people to communicate over long distances whenever and wherever they are, and instantaneously at that when the one called is wearing one too. Having said that, though, it must immediately be added that they, also, have a complex disadvantage, and it is one we are hard pushed to understand. In fact, due to its complexity people simply tend to neglect it, even though everyone in his right mind has had experience with it. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. King-Tak Ip, ed. Environmental Ethics: Intercultural Perspectives[REVIEW]Shane Ralston - 2010 - Philosophy in Review 30 (5):358-361.
    As the title suggests, this collection addresses the very topical subject matter of environmental ethics by bringing together a host of unique voices. In the editor’s words, ‘[t]he essays collected here represent a joint effort in dealing with this problem [of global environmental conservation and protection]. All contributors to this volume agree that what we urgently need now is global awareness of the environmental crisis we are facing’ (9). While a thread of consensus weaves throughout, what is more striking is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Ethical issues of using umbilical cord blood stem cell therapy of John Stuart Mill perspective.Pattamawadee Sankheangaew - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy 1.
    This academic paper on Ethical issues of using umbilical cord blood stem cell therapy of John Stuart Mill perspective aim to investigate the new approaches in the treatment of diseases by using umbilical cord blood stem cells. And also to study ethical issues from the use of umbilical cord blood stem cells in the treatment of diseases considered by Mill’s utilitarianism. 21st century, the medical industry was interested in organ transplantation from stem cells especially stem cells (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. An account of conserved functions and how biologists use them to integrate cell and evolutionary biology.Jeremy G. Wideman, Steve Elliott & Beckett Sterner - 2023 - Biology and Philosophy 38 (5):1-23.
    We characterize a type of functional explanation that addresses why a homologous trait originating deep in the evolutionary history of a group remains widespread and largely unchanged across the group’s lineages. We argue that biologists regularly provide this type of explanation when they attribute conserved functions to phenotypic and genetic traits. The concept of conserved function applies broadly to many biological domains, and we illustrate its importance using examples of molecular sequence alignments at the intersection of evolution and cell biology. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. What came first: the virus or the cell?Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    A retrospective of the debates on the origin of life: the virus or the cell? The virus needs a cell for replication, instead the cell is higher on the evolutionary scale of life. Viruses appear to have played a role in events such as the origin of cell life and the evolution of mammals. Even the simplest bacteria is far too complex to have appeared spontaneously at the beginning of evolution. Subsequently, evolution has been able to produce increasingly complex systems. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. The Acceptability of Online Learning Action Cell Session Practice to Tagumpay National High School Teachers.Ann Michelle S. Medina, Mari Cris O. Lim & Aldren E. Camposagrado - 2023 - Universal Journal of Educational Research 2 (2):99-109.
    This quantitative study explores the acceptability of Online Learning Action Cell (LAC) practice as a school-based professional development strategy for Tagumpay National High School (TNHS) teachers. The research was motivated by the Department of Education (DepEd) Order No. 35 s. 2016 which prompts public schools to comply with the implementation of LAC sessions because it has a positive impact on teachers’ beliefs and practices resulting in education reforms for learners’ benefit. However, in compliance with DepEd’s policy on maximizing Time-On-Task (DepEd (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Diagrams as locality aids for explanation and model construction in cell biology.Nicholaos Jones & Olaf Wolkenhauer - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (5):705-721.
    Using as case studies two early diagrams that represent mechanisms of the cell division cycle, we aim to extend prior philosophical analyses of the roles of diagrams in scientific reasoning, and specifically their role in biological reasoning. The diagrams we discuss are, in practice, integral and indispensible elements of reasoning from experimental data about the cell division cycle to mathematical models of the cycle’s molecular mechanisms. In accordance with prior analyses, the diagrams provide functional explanations of the cell cycle and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  41. A Critical Examination of the Question of Personhood in Stem Cell Research.Diana-Abasi Ibanga - 2016 - IOSR Journal of HumanitieS and Social Science 21 (8):6-13.
    Stem cell research programme has been celebrated world over as the most promising medical research in the 21st century. However, the method of stem cell research involves the use and unavoidable destruction of human embryo. As a result of this, many theologians, scholars and analysts have condemned the research programme. Their argument is that the embryo use in stem cell research is human person; hence it is immoral. This paper therefore aims at analyzing and examining the issue in order to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. The philosophy of stem cells: Melinda Bonnie Fagan: Philosophy of stem cell biology: Knowledge in flesh and blood. Basingstoke and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, xx+274pp, £66.00 HB. [REVIEW]Stavros Ioannidis - 2015 - Metascience 24 (2):285-288.
    Melinda Fagan’s book on the philosophy of stem cell biology is a superb discussion of this exciting field of contemporary science, and the first book-length philosophical treatment of the subject. It contains a detailed and insightful examination of stem cell science, its structure, methods, and challenges.The book does not require any previous knowledge of stem cell biology—all the relevant scientific details and concepts, the central experimental procedures and results, as well as the historical development of the field, are presented in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Human stem-cell-derived embryo models: When bioethical normativity meets biological ontology.Adrian Villalba - 2024 - Developmental Biology 508.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. 'Trust us... we're doctors': Science, media, and ethics in the Hwang stem cell controversy.Robert Sparrow - 2006 - Journal of Communication Research 43 (1):5-24.
    When doubts were first raised about the veracity of the dramatic advances in stem cell research announced by Professor Hwang Woo-Suk, a significant minority response was to question the qualifications of journalists to investigate the matter. In this paper I examine the contemporary relationships between science, scientists, the public, and the media. In the modern context the progress of science often relies on the media to mobilise public support for research and also for the purpose of communication within the scientific (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Scientific iconoclasm and active imagination: synthetic cells as techo-schientific mandalas.Hub Zwart - 2018 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 14 (1):1-17.
    Metaphors allow us to come to terms with abstract and complex information, by comparing it to something which is structured, familiar and concrete. Although modern science is “iconoclastic”, as Gaston Bachelard phrases it, scientists are at the same time prolific producers of metaphoric images themselves. Synthetic biology is an outstanding example of a technoscientific discourse replete with metaphors, including textual metaphors such as the “Morse code” of life, the “barcode” of life and the “book” of life. This paper focuses on (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  46. That is life: communicating RNA networks from viruses and cells in continuous interaction.Guenther Witzany - 2019 - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences:1-16.
    All the conserved detailed results of evolution stored in DNA must be read, transcribed, and translated via an RNAmediated process. This is required for the development and growth of each individual cell. Thus, all known living organisms fundamentally depend on these RNA-mediated processes. In most cases, they are interconnected with other RNAs and their associated protein complexes and function in a strictly coordinated hierarchy of temporal and spatial steps (i.e., an RNA network). Clearly, all cellular life as we know it (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  47. Good science and good ethics: why we should discourage payment for eggs in stem cell researchonation.Donna Dickenson - 2009 - Nature Reviews Genetics 10 (11):743.
    Payment for eggs used in stem cell research puts women at unacceptable risk and encourages exploitative commodification of the female body. Thanks to the development of induced pluripotent stem cells, however, we no longer face a choice between good science and good ethics.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Improving the justice‐based argument for conducting human gene editing research to cure sickle cell disease.Berman Chan - 2019 - Bioethics 34 (2):200-202.
    In a recent article, Marilyn Baffoe-Bonnie offers three arguments for conducting CRISPR/Cas9 biotechnology research to cure sickle-cell disease (SCD) based on addressing historical and current injustices in SCD research and care. I show that her second and third arguments suffer from roughly the same defect, which is that they really argue for something else rather than for conducting CRISPR/Cas9 research in particular. For instance, the second argument argues that conducting this gene therapy research would improve the relationship between SCD sufferers (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Regeneration of Hydra from aggregated cells.Alfred Gierer, S. Berking, H. Bode, C. N. David, K. Flick, G. Hansmann, H. Schaller & E. Trenkner - 1972 - Nature New Biology 239:98-101.
    • Aggregates of previously isolated cells of Hydra are capable, under suitable solvant conditions, of regeneration forming complete animals. In a first stage, ecto- and endodermal cells sort out, producing the bilayered hollow structure characteristic of Hydra tissue; thereafter, heads are formed (even if the original cell preparation contained no head cells), eventually leading to the separation of normal animals with head, body column and foot. Hydra appears to be the highest type of organism that allows for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. A Phenomenological Study of the Lived Experiences of Tagumpay National High School Teachers Involved in Online Learning Action Cell Session.Ann Michelle S. Medina, Aldren E. Camposagrado & Mari Cris O. Lim - 2022 - Universal Journal of Educational Research 1 (3):142-154.
    A qualitative phenomenological approach was used in this study to describe the lived experiences of Tagumpay National High School (TNHS) teachers on Online Learning Action Cell (LAC) session. LAC is a school-based professional development for teachers implemented by the Philippine Department of Education (DepEd). Due to teacher’s lack of participation on classroom LAC, a fully-online mode option is explored by offering TNHS teachers Online LAC session using Facebook as a Learning Management System (LMS). To capture the lived experience of teachers, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 517