Results for 'medicalization'

7 found
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  1. The Medicalization of Love.Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (3):323-336.
    Pharmaceuticals or other emerging technologies could be used to enhance (or diminish) feelings of lust, attraction, and attachment in adult romantic partnerships. While such interventions could conceivably be used to promote individual (and couple) well-being, their widespread development and/or adoption might lead to “medicalization” of human love and heartache—for some, a source of serious concern. In this essay, we argue that the “medicalization of love” need not necessarily be problematic, on balance, but could plausibly be expected to have (...)
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  2. The Time of the Change: Menopause's Medicalization and the Gender Politics of Aging. van de Wiel - 2014 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (1):74.
    As a nexus of fertility’s finitude and female midlife, menopause is a physical and cultural phenomenon through which the relation between the medicalization of the female reproductive cycle and normative attitudes toward aging become expressed. Age, like other systems of separation, can function as an “instrument of regulatory regimes” and shows similarities to gender in its body-bound, surface-focused, and morally coded position in the sociomedical sphere. However, although age is an influential social category, its reliance on historical and epistemic (...)
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  3. Patient Complains of …: How Medicalization Mediates Power and Justice.Alison Reiheld - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (1):72-98.
    The process of medicalization has been analyzed in the medical humanities with disapprobation, with much emphasis placed on its ability to reinforce existing social power structures to ill effect. While true, this is an incomplete picture of medicalization. I argue that medicalization can both reinforce and disrupt existing social hierarchies within the clinic and outside of it, to ill or good effect. We must attend to how this takes place locally and globally lest we misunderstand how (...) mediates power and justice. I provide concrete examples of how this occurs by considering dysesthesia ethiopsis, autism, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, and HIV/AIDS. (shrink)
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  4.  90
    Paying for the Possibility of Disease: How Medicalization of Risk Conditions Affects Health Policy and Why We Must Bear It In Mind.Alison Reiheld - 2008 - Medical Humanities Report:3, 4, 6.
    In this paper, I sound a warning note about the medicalization of risk conditions such as high cholesterol, especially in a health care climate of resource scarcity.
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  5.  54
    Her Body Her Own Worst Enemy”: The Medicalization of Violence Against Women.Abby L. Wilkerson - 1998 - In Stanley French, Wanda Teays & Laura Purdy (eds.), Violence Against Women: Philosophical Perspectives. Cornell University Press. pp. 123--138.
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    With All Due Caution: Global Anti-Obesity Campaigns and the Individualization of Responsibility.Alison Reiheld - 2015 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (2):226-249.
    Obesity is one of several targets of public health efforts related to availability of and access to healthy foods. The tension between individual food decisions and social contexts of food production, preparation, and consumption makes targeting individuals deeply problematic and yet tempting. Such individualization of responsibility for obesity and nutrition is unethical and impractical. This article warns public health campaigns against giving into the temptation to individualize responsibility, and presents an argument for why they should proceed with all due caution, (...)
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  7.  12
    The Democratic Biopolitics of PrEP.Karsten Schubert - 2019 - In Helene Gerhards & Kathrin Braun (eds.), Biopolitiken - Regierungen des Lebens heute. Wiesbaden: Springer Fachmedien. pp. 121-153.
    PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) is a relatively new drug-based HIV prevention technique and an important means to lower the HIV risk of gay men who are especially vulnerable to HIV. From the perspective of biopolitics, PrEP inscribes itself in a larger trend of medicalization and the rise of pharmapower. This article reconstructs and evaluates contemporary literature on biopolitical theory as it applies to PrEP, by bringing it in a dialogue with a mapping of the political debate on PrEP. As PrEP (...)
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