Results for 'public sphere'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Indiscriminate mass surveillance and the public sphere.Titus Stahl - 2016 - Ethics and Information Technology 18 (1):33-39.
    Recent disclosures suggest that many governments apply indiscriminate mass surveillance technologies that allow them to capture and store a massive amount of communications data belonging to citizens and non-citizens alike. This article argues that traditional liberal critiques of government surveillance that center on an individual right to privacy cannot completely capture the harm that is caused by such surveillance because they ignore its distinctive political dimension. As a complement to standard liberal approaches to privacy, the article develops a critique of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  2. Veils, Crucifixes, and the Public Sphere: What Kind of Secularism? Rethinking Neutrality in a Post-Secular Europe.Pablo Cristóbal Jiménez Lobeira - 2014 - Journal of Intercultural Studies 35 (4):385-402.
    The Lautsi case in Italy attracted widespread attention in Europe and beyond. Though the issue under contention was a Christian symbol, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) judgements showed changes in assessment both about religion (in contrast with former cases regarding Muslim veils) and secularism (which did not have the same meaning for everyone). In light of those rulings, this paper reflects on the concepts of neutrality and secularism and their normative implications for European citizens in terms of belonging, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3. Utopia and the Public Sphere.Timothy Stanley - 2015 - In Religion after Secularization in Australia. Palgrave MacMillan.
    Although the question of religion did not feature prominently in Jürgen Habermas’s early political theory, his more recent work has continuously addressed the topic. This later interest in religion is grounded in what one commentator in a volume on The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere, cited as the urgent need to integrate religious voices in the workings of public reason in order to avoid social disharmony and to thwart potential violence. However, the following paper argues (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Recommendations for a Healthy Digital Public Sphere.Kalli Giannelos - 2023 - Journal of Media Ethics 38 (2):80-92.
    As the multiple issues of the digital public sphere threaten our democracies and the cohesion of our societies, most attempts for a betterment of the digital networks and platforms revolve around a risk-response approach. This paper takes the opposite approach and develops a positive definition of the ideal ethical public sphere, combining normative features with original taxonomies. In view of defining common standards for a healthy digital public sphere, this paper offers an interdisciplinary literature (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Computational Transformation of the Public Sphere: Theories and Cases.S. M. Amadae (ed.) - 2020 - Helsinki: Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki.
    This book is an edited collection of original research papers on the digital revolution of the public and governance. It covers cyber governance in Finland, and the securitization of cyber security in Finland. It investigates the cases of Brexit, the 2016 US presidential election of Donald Trump, the 2017 presidential election of Volodymyr Zelensky, and Brexit. It examines the environmental concerns of climate change and greenwashing, and the impact of digital communication giving rise to the #MeToo and Incel movements. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Religious Reasons in the Public Sphere: A Challenge to Habermas.Joshua Duclos - 2019 - Philosophy and Theology 31 (1):121-143.
    Should religious reasons be used in political discourse? Habermas argues that religious reasons can enter the public sphere so long as they undergo a translation that meets the standards of public reason. I argue that such a translation may be either unnecessary or impossible. Habermas does not sufficiently consider the possibility that religious reasons are already publicly accessible such that no translation is required. Moreover, Habermas entirely fails to consider the possibility that, if he is right about (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. On the Presence of Educated Religious Beliefs in the Public Sphere.Gheorghe-Ilie Farte - 2015 - Argumentum. Journal of the Seminar of Discursive Logic, Argumentation Theory and Rhetoric 13 (2):146-178.
    Discursive liberal democracy might not be the best of all possible forms of government, yet in Europe it is largely accepted as such. The attractors of liberal democracy (majority rule, political equality, reasonable self-determination and an ideological framework built in a tentative manner) as well as an adequate dose of secularization (according to the doctrine of religious restraint) provide both secularist and educated religious people with the most convenient ideological framework. Unfortunately, many promoters of ideological secularization take too strong a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. The platform economy’s infrastructural transformation of the public sphere: Facebook and Cambridge Analytica revisited.Anna-Verena Nosthoff & Felix Maschewski - 2024 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 50 (1):178-199.
    From a socio-theoretical and media-theoretical perspective, this article analyses exemplary practices and structural characteristics of contemporary digital political campaigning to illustrate a transformation of the public sphere through the platform economy. The article first examines Cambridge Analytica and reconstructs its operational procedure, which, far from involving exceptionally new digital campaign practices, turns out to be quite standard. It then evaluates the role of Facebook as an enabling ‘affective infrastructure’, technologically orchestrating processes of political opinion-formation. Of special concern are (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Discursive Incarceration: Black Fragility in a Divided Public Sphere.Meili Steele - 2022 - Jam It! Journal of American Studies in Italy 7.
    The expression of fragility has always been a difficult and complex matter for African Americans, for the discourse of mainstream media is set up to sustain their fragility while at the same time misrecognizing it. Even though the black public sphere split off from the dominant public sphere after the Civil War to enable distinctive forms of expression, the “practiced habits” of which Coates speaks continued in the structures of the dominant discourse. My essay will analyze (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. What Social Media Facilitates, Social Media should Regulate: Duties in the New Public Sphere.Leonie Smith - 2021 - The Political Quarterly 92 (2):1-8.
    This article offers a distinctive way of grounding the regulative duties held by social media companies (SMCs). One function of the democratic state is to provide what we term the right to democratic epistemic participation within the public sphere. But social media has transformed our public sphere, such that SMCs now facilitate citizens’ right to democratic epistemic participation and do so on a scale that was previously impossible. We argue that this role of SMCs in expanding (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. An Epistemic Argument for an Egalitarian Public Sphere.Michael Bennett - 2020 - Episteme 1.
    The public sphere should be regulated so the distribution of political speech does not correlate with the distribution of income or wealth. A public sphere where people can fund any political speech from their private holdings is epistemically defective. The argument has four steps. First, if political speech is unregulated, the rich predictably contribute a disproportionate share. Second, wealth tends to correlate with substantive political perspectives. Third, greater quantities of speech by the rich can “drown out” (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12. Can Social Media Be Seen as a New Public Sphere in the Context of Hannah Arendt's Public Sphere Theory?Metehan Karakurt & Aykut Aykutalp - 2020 - Londra, Birleşik Krallık: IJOPEC Publication Limited.
    With the 21st century, we are witnessing the mass spread of the communication technologies and social media revolution. Interactive networks built on a global scale have led to the formation of a virtual world of reality that is connecting the whole world. With the global spread of communication networks, the question of whether social media points to a new public sphere has been raised. Social media applications such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are nowadays seen as a place (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. #MeToo-Movement, Digital Media and Public Sphere.Eleanor Suovilla, Pietari Suomela, Anniina Riikonen, Susanna Kupiainen & Anni Juusola - 2020 - In S. M. Amadae (ed.), Computational Transformation of the Public Sphere: Theories and Cases. Helsinki: Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Helsinki. pp. 211-227.
    In this paper we will examine the influence digital media has had on political dialogue in the public sphere. We will explore the phenomenon through an example case, namely the global feminist #MeToo movement which started in 2017. Within the framework of the #MeToo Movement, we introduce and examine the challenges digital media poses to the political dialogue in the public sphere. We start by going through concepts and theories utilized in this research paper. Then we (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Civil disobedience in a distorted public sphere.Martin Blaakman - 2012 - Krisis: Journal for Contemporary Philosophy (3):27-36.
    Rawls’s notion of civil disobedience, which still dominates the literature on this subject, comprises at least these three characteristics: it involves breaking the law, is non-violent and public. But implicit in this notion is a certain tension: it shows pessisimism about the proper functioning of the public sphere as earlier normal appeals have failed, but it also displays a certain optimism about its proper functioning as it assumes that civil disobedience may be effective. In my paper I (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Critical remarks on Religion in the public sphere' – Habermas between Kant and Kierkegaard.Roe Fremstedal - 2009 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (1):27-47.
    This article provides a critical assessment of Habermas’s recent work on religion and its role in the public sphere by comparing it to Kant’s phi-losophy of religion on the one hand and that of Kierkegaard on the other. It is argued that although Habermas is in many ways a Kantian, he diverges from Kant when it comes to religion, by taking a position which comes closer to the Kierkegaardian view that religiousness belongs to private faith rather than philosophy. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Biomedical technocracy, the networked public sphere and the biopolitics of COVID-19: notes on the Agamben affair.Tim Christiaens - 2022 - Culture Theory and Critique 1 (63):1-18.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Anonymity and Democracy: Absence as Presence in the Public Sphere.Hans Asenbaum - 2018 - American Political Science Review 112 (3):459–472.
    Although anonymity is a central feature of liberal democracies—not only in the secret ballot, but also in campaign funding, publishing political texts, masked protests, and graffiti—it has so far not been conceptually grounded in democratic theory. Rather, it is treated as a self-explanatory concept related to privacy. To overcome this omission, this article develops a complex understanding of anonymity in the context of democratic theory. Drawing upon the diverse literature on anonymity in political participation, it explains anonymity as a highly (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  18. On the Integration of Populism into the Democratic Public Sphere.Gheorghe-Ilie Farte - 2017 - Argumentum. Journal of the Seminar of Discursive Logic, Argumentation Theory and Rhetoric 15 (2):87-109.
    The central thesis of this article is that populism is a side effect of liberal democracy and a reliable indicator of the relationship between liberal democracy and its polar opposite ‒ illiberal majoritarianism. As long as liberal democracy prevails over illiberal majoritarianism, populism remains dormant. Populism rises and becomes conspicuous only if certain manifestations of illiberal majoritarianism or illiberal elitism reach a critical point in terms of number and impact. More exactly, populism becomes active when there are too few reasonable (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. On the Global Multiplicity of Public Spheres. The democratic transformation of the public sphere?James Tully - manuscript
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Second-Order Arguments, or Do We Still Need Tolerance in the Public Sphere?Aleksei Loginov - 2019 - Changing Societies and Personalities 3 (4):319-332.
    A number of widely discussed court decisions on cases of insults against religious feelings in Russia, such as the relatively recent “Pokemon Go” case of blogger Ruslan Sokolovsky or the lawsuit filed against an Orthodox priest by Nikolai Ryabchevsky in Yekaterinburg for comparing Lenin with Hitler, make pertinent the question of why toleration becomes so difficult in matters concerning religion. In this paper, I revise the classical liberal concept of toleration (David Heyd, Peter Nicholson, and John Horton), arguing that it (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Complexity, diversity and the role of the public sphere on the Internet.Nathan Eckstrand - 2019 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 46 (8):961-984.
    This article explores the relationship between deliberative democracy, the Internet, and systems theory’s thoughts on diversity. After introducing Habermas’s theory of deliberative democracy and how diversity fits into it, the article discusses various ideas about whether and how it could work on the Internet. Next, the article looks at research into diversity done in the field of complex adaptive systems, showing that diversity has both good and bad effects, but is clearly preferred for the purpose of survival. The article concludes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Crucifixes, public schools, and plurality in Europe.Pablo Cristóbal Jiménez Lobeira - 2011 - On Line Opinion.
    Plurality implies a public sphere in which different worldviews (e.g. Secular Humanist, Christian, Jewish, Muslim and others) coexist respecting each other. Banning the presence of one or several of them from the public sphere is questionable in principle, and divisive in practice.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Receptive Publics.Joshua Habgood-Coote, Natalie Alana Ashton & Nadja El Kassar - 2024 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 11.
    It is widely accepted that public discourse as we know it is less than ideal from an epistemological point of view. In this paper, we develop an underappreciated aspect of the trouble with public discourse: what we call the Listening Problem. The listening problem is the problem that public discourse has in giving appropriate uptake and reception to ideas and concepts from oppressed groups. Drawing on the work of Jürgen Habermas and Nancy Fraser, we develop an institutional (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Privacy in Public: A Democratic Defense.Titus Stahl - 2020 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 7 (1):73-96.
    Traditional arguments for privacy in public suggest that intentionally public activities, such as political speech, do not deserve privacy protection. In this article, I develop a new argument for the view that surveillance of intentionally public activities should be limited to protect the specific good that this context provides, namely democratic legitimacy. Combining insights from Helen Nissenbaum’s contextualism and Jürgen Habermas’s theory of the public sphere, I argue that strategic surveillance of the public (...) can undermine the capacity of citizens to freely deliberate in public and therefore conflicts with democratic self-determination. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25. Philosophers in the Public Square: A Religious Resolution of Kant's Conflict of the Faculties.Stephen R. Palmquist - unknown
    This paper is, in part, a report on the conclusions reached at a retreat on Part One of Kant's Conflict of the Faculties, held at the Center for Insight into Philosophic Health, Education, and Renewal, in Mendocino, California. It argues that Kant's distinction between the public and private spheres does not remove but intensifies the philosopher's duty to influence the general public. I conclude with some reflections on how a Kantian philosopher might have a positive influence on religious (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Publicity, Privacy, and Religious Toleration in Hobbes's Leviathan.Arash Abizadeh - 2013 - Modern Intellectual History 10 (2):261-291.
    What motivated an absolutist Erastian who rejected religious freedom, defended uniform public worship, and deemed the public expression of disagreement a catalyst for war to endorse a movement known to history as the champion of toleration, no coercion in religion, and separation of church and state? At least three factors motivated Hobbes’s 1651 endorsement of Independency: the Erastianism of Cromwellian Independency, the influence of the politique tradition, and, paradoxically, the contribution of early-modern practices of toleration to maintaining the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  27. Practising collectivity: Performing public space in everyday China.Teresa Hoskyns, Siti Balkish Roslan & Claudia Westermann - 2022 - Technoetic Arts 20 (3):203-224.
    This article investigates the specific cultural and collaborative nature of China’s public spaces and how they are formed through performative appropriations. Collective cultural practices as political participation were encouraged during the Mao era when cultural activities played a key role in workers’ education and participation. Since the opening-up period, performance in public space has become widespread in China and creates alternative community spaces that constitute alternatives to capitalist spaces of consumption. Using Habermas’s theory of communicative action, we argue (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28. Understanding Race: The Case for Political Constructionism in Public Discourse.David Ludwig - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (4):492-504.
    The aim of this article is to develop an understanding-based argument for an explicitly political specification of the concept of race. It is argued that a specification of race in terms of hierarchical social positions is best equipped to guide causal reasoning about racial inequality in the public sphere. Furthermore, the article provides evidence that biological and cultural specifications of race mislead public reasoning by encouraging confusions between correlates and causes of racial inequality. The article concludes with (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  29. Privacy in Public and the contextual conditions of agency.Maria Brincker - 2017 - In Timan Tjerk, Koops Bert-Jaap & Newell Bryce (eds.), (forthcoming) in Privacy in Public Space: Conceptual and Regulatory Challenges. Edward Elgar.
    Current technology and surveillance practices make behaviors traceable to persons in unprecedented ways. This causes a loss of anonymity and of many privacy measures relied on in the past. These de facto privacy losses are by many seen as problematic for individual psychology, intimate relations and democratic practices such as free speech and free assembly. I share most of these concerns but propose that an even more fundamental problem might be that our very ability to act as autonomous and purposive (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. The Priority of Public Reasons and Religious Forms of Life in Constitutional Democracies.Cristina Lafont - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (4):45-60.
    In this essay I address the difficult question of how citizens with conflicting religious and secular views can fulfill the democratic obligation of justifying the imposition of coercive policies to others with reasons that they can also accept. After discussing the difficulties of proposals that either exclude religious beliefs from public deliberation or include them without any restrictions, I argue instead for a policy of mutual accountability that imposes the same deliberative rights and obligations on all democratic citizens. The (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. The discursive dilemma and public reason.Christian List - 2006 - Ethics 116 (2):362-402.
    Political theorists have offered many accounts of collective decision-making under pluralism. I discuss a key dimension on which such accounts differ: the importance assigned not only to the choices made but also to the reasons underlying those choices. On that dimension, different accounts lie in between two extremes. The ‘minimal liberal account’ holds that collective decisions should be made only on practical actions or policies and that underlying reasons should be kept private. The ‘comprehensive deliberative account’ stresses the importance of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   91 citations  
  32.  41
    Public Health in Private.Philippa Nicole Barr - 2024 - Australian Feminist Studies 39:1-16.
    Elite women seized the public health campaign during the 1900 plague outbreak to assert political influence and advocate for sanitation reform grounded in their domestic experiences. These women advocated for their inclusion in the political sphere by valuing their domestic experiences as knowledge relevant for public health initiatives. This reframing of experience positioned them as viable citizens in the imminent Federation. Applying Laura Zanotti's concept of relational ontology, this analysis frames their actions as not simply a battle (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Rethinking the Post-Truth Polarisation Narrative: Social Roles and Hinge Commitments in the PluralPublic Sphere.Natalie Alana Ashton & Rowan Cruft - 2021 - The Political Quarterly 4 (92):598-605.
    This article critically evaluates what we call the ‘popular narrative’ about the state of the public sphere. We identify three elements of this popular narrative (the post-truth element, the polarisation element and the new technology element), and draw on philosophical work on hinge epistemology and social roles to challenge each one. We propose, instead, that public debate has always depended on non-evidential commitments, that it has always been home to significant, deep division, and that social media, rather (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Dreptatea ca principiu de organizare a vietii politice.Gheorghe-Ilie Farte - 2018 - In Virgil Stoica & Bogdan Constantin Mihăilescu (eds.), Noi perspective asupra valorilor politice.
    The main thesis of this paper is that justice is not a natural law that (re)establishes equilibrium and order in the universe, but a disposition enforced by a fighting will to render to every man his due in line with a regime of rights, powers, or immunities to use, enjoy and control some external goods. Inasmuch as there is no sense, feeling or instinct of justice, it is reasonable to assert that people regulate their conduct under the authority of a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. Passionate Speech: On the Uses and Abuses of Anger in Public Debate.Alessandra Tanesini - 2021 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 89:153-176.
    Anger dominates debates in the public sphere. In this article I argue that there are diverse forms of anger that merit different responses. My focus is especially on two types of anger that I label respectively arrogant and resistant. The first is the characteristic defensive response of those who unwarrantedly arrogate special privileges for themselves. The second is often a source of insight and a form of moral address. I detail some discursive manifestations of these two types of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36. On the Virtues of Inhospitality: toward an Ethics of Public Reason and Critical Engagement.Lawrence Torcello - 2014 - Philo 17 (1):99-115.
    This article seeks to re-conceptualize Rawlsian public reason as a critical tool against ideological propaganda. The article proposes that public reason, as a standard for public discourse, must be conceptualized beyond its mandate for comprehensive neutrality to additionally emphasize critique of ideologically driven ignorance and propaganda in the public realm. I connect uncritical hospitality to such ideological propaganda with Harry Frankfurt’s concept of bullshit. This paper proposes that philosophers have a unique moral obligation to engage bullshit (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Philosophers in the Public Square: A Religious Resolution of Kant’s Conflict of the Faculties.Stephen R. Palmquist & Richard W. Mapplebeckpalmer - 2006 - In Stephen R. Palmquist & Chris L. Firestone (eds.), Kant and the New Philosophy of Religion. Indiana University Press. pp. 230-254.
    This paper is, in part, a report on the conclusions reached at a retreat on Part One of Kant's Conflict of the Faculties, held at the Center for Insight into Philosophic Health, Education, and Renewal, in Mendocino, California. It argues that Kant's distinction between the public and private spheres does not remove but intensifies the philosopher's duty to influence the general public. I conclude with some reflections on how a Kantian philosopher might have a positive influence on religious (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38. Pluralism Slippery Slopes and Democratic Public Discourse.Maria Paola Ferretti & Enzo Rossi - 2013 - Theoria: A Journal of Social and Political Theory 60 (137):29-47.
    Agonist theorists have argued against deliberative democrats that democratic institutions should not seek to establish a rational consensus, but rather allow political disagreements to be expressed in an adversarial form. But democratic agonism is not antagonism: some restriction of the plurality of admissible expressions is not incompatible with a legitimate public sphere. However, is it generally possible to grant this distinction between antagonism and agonism without accepting normative standards in public discourse that saliently resemble those advocated by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. Political communication in Social Networks Election campaigns and digital data analysis: a bibliographic review.Luca Corchia - 2019 - Rivista Trimestrale di Scienza Dell’Amministrazione (2):1-50.
    The outcomes of a bibliographic review on political communication, in particular electoral communication in social networks, are presented here. The electoral campaigning are a crucial test to verify the transformations of the media system and of the forms and uses of the linguistic acts by dominant actors in public sphere – candidates, parties, journalists and Gatekeepers. The aim is to reconstruct the first elements of an analytical model on the transformations of the political public sphere, with (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. La esfera pública y El bar de las Folies Bergère de Edouard Manet.Carlos Vanegas - 2014 - Revista Colombiana de Pensamiento Estético E Historia Del Arte:121-137.
    The main discourses on art during the nineteenth century defined the artist as a spirit that should express their unbridled creativity, and overall that had the strength to express its total personal autonomy from institutional processes of culture. Thus, Manet’s work A bar at the Folies—Bergere contains substantial elements that express and help us to understand both the role of the artist, as the crisis of meaning in the work of modern art and problematic public sphere, treated by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Toward an Islamic Conception of Democracy: Islam and the Notion of Public Reason.Raja Bahlul - 2003 - Critique: Critical Middle Eastern Studies 12 (1):43-60.
    This paper is a discussion of the ways in which the notion of public reason has come to manifest itself in recent Islamic writings. The discussion is part of an effort to discover a common language in terms of which Islamic and liberal/secular discourses about democracy and public debate can be understood. The difficult question we are left with is whether it is permissible to speak of “public reason” sans phrase, or whether the notion must always be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. In the Privacy of Our Streets.Carissa Véliz - 2018 - In Bryce Clayton Newell, Tjerk Timan & Bert-Jaap Koops (eds.), Surveillance, Privacy and Public Space. Routledge. pp. 16-32.
    If one lives in a city and wants to be by oneself or have a private conversation with someone else, there are two ways to set about it: either one finds a place of solitude, such as one’s bedroom, or one finds a place crowded enough, public enough, that attention to each person dilutes so much so as to resemble a deserted refuge. Often, one can get more privacy in public places than in the most private of spaces. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. #Palladium of the People: A Kantian Right to Internet Access.Christopher Buckman - 2017 - Sociologia: Rivista Quadrimestrale di Scienze Storiche E Sociali 51 (3).
    Lack of high-speed internet access remains a problem in the United States, particularly in rural areas, Tribal lands, and the U.S. territories. High-speed internet should be considered a basic right because it connects people to social media, the new public sphere. Critics worry about the politically polarizing effects of online social media, but its ability to unify, connect, and shape policy decisions should also be taken into account. Engaging with Jürgen Habermas’s early work on the public (...), I argue that the technical and cultural extension of access to social media can realize Kant’s vision of the public sphere as a bridge between morality and politics. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44. Big Tech, Algorithmic Power, and Democratic Control.Ugur Aytac - forthcoming - Journal of Politics.
    This paper argues that instituting Citizen Boards of Governance (CBGs) is the optimal strategy to democratically contain Big Tech’s algorithmic powers in the digital public sphere. CBGs are bodies of randomly selected citizens that are authorized to govern the algorithmic infrastructure of Big Tech platforms. The main advantage of CBGs is to tackle the concentrated powers of private tech corporations without giving too much power to governments. I show why this is a better approach than ordinary state regulation (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Public Religions in a Postsecular Era: Habermas and Gandhi on Revisioning the Political.Vidhu Verma - 2014 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2014 (167):49-67.
    An embedded ideology of the religious-secular binary in its various forms has assumed currency in recent continental and Anglo-American political thought. This ideology highlights the difference between religion under modernization, broadly defined by the secularization thesis, and that of religious revival in a period characterized by postsecularism. It reflects the rise of new epistemologies and the dissolution of the antinomies between faith and reason characteristic of a postsecular culture. A common argument found in these writings is that enlightenment secularization, which (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Religion and Politics in Africa: The Future of “The Secular”.Jon Abbink - 2014 - Africa Spectrum 49 (3):83-106.
    This essay discusses the continued importance that religion holds in African life, not only in terms of numbers of believers, but also regarding the varieties of religious experience and its links with politics and the “public sphere(s)”. Coinciding with the wave of democratization and economic liberalization efforts since about 1990, a notable growth of the public presence of religion and its political referents in Africa has been witnessed; alongside “development”, religion will remain a hot issue in the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. From Procedural Rights to Political Economy: New Horizons for Regulating Online Privacy.Daniel Susser - 2023 - In Sabine Trepte & Philipp K. Masur (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Privacy and Social Media. Routledge. pp. 281-290.
    The 2010s were a golden age of information privacy research, but its policy accomplishments tell a mixed story. Despite significant progress on the development of privacy theory and compelling demonstrations of the need for privacy in practice, real achievements in privacy law and policy have been, at best, uneven. In this chapter, I outline three broad shifts in the way scholars (and, to some degree, advocates and policy makers) are approaching privacy and social media. First, a change in emphasis from (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Moderate Inclusivism and the Conversational Translation Proviso: Revising Habermas' Ethics of Citizenship.Jonas Jakobsen - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (4):87-112.
    Habermas’ ‘ethics of citizenship’ raises a number of relevant concerns about the dangers of a secularistic exclusion of religious contributions to public deliberation, on the one hand, and the dangers of religious conflict and sectarianism in politics, on the other. Agreeing largely with these concerns, the paper identities four problems with Habermas’ approach, and attempts to overcome them: the full exclusion of religious reasons from parliamentary debate; the full inclusion of religious reasons in the informal public sphere; (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. “From Museum Walls to Facebook Walls”*. A new public space for art.Gizela Horvath - 2014 - In Gizela Horvath, Rozalia Klara Bako & Eva Biro Kaszas (eds.), Ten Years of Facebook. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Argumentation and Rhetoric. Partium Kiado. pp. 73-88.
    The ‘museal’ approach to art has been attacked from many angles in the last decade; the main issue raised by most of these attacks was that such an approach would promote a certain idea of art which has little to do with real-life or the layman’s interest. Some artists have protested by stepping out of the museum space with projects deliberately designed as non-museum items (performance, land-art, public art etc.). Art, however, is always meant for a public, so, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. A Retraction of The Cosmic Sphere.Kip Sewell - 2022 - Rond Media Library.
    Abstract: In a 1999 book entitled 'The Cosmic Sphere', the author proposed an unconventional model of the Universe intended to solve conceptual and empirical problems facing the Big Bang theory. The author has since had second thoughts, however, and has concluded that his proposed Cosmic Sphere Model (CSM) of the Universe is flawed and cannot be accurate. In this article, the author provides an overview of 'The Cosmic Sphere' and CSM, points out the errors of both, analyzes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000