Results for 'Pay walls'

879 found
Order:
  1. Review of Interdisciplining Digital Humanities: Boundary Work in an Emerging Field. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2016 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (7 (July)):577-8.
    This review makes a case for scholars putting up their works online and for removing pay-walls of any kind. Therefore, this review is in sync with the stated aims of philpapers.org.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. A robust hybrid theory of well-being.Steven Wall & David Sobel - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 178 (9):2829-2851.
    This paper articulates and defends a novel hybrid account of well-being. We will call our view a Robust Hybrid. We call it robust because it grants a broad and not subservient role to both objective and subjective values. In this paper we assume, we think plausibly but without argument, that there is a significant objective component to well-being. Here we clarify what it takes for an account of well-being to have a subjective component. Roughly, we argue, it must allow that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  3. Ontologies as Integrative Tools for Plant Science.Ramona Walls, Balaji Athreya, Laurel Cooper, Justin Elser, Maria A. Gandolfo, Pankaj Jaiswal, Christopher J. Mungall, Justin Preece, Stefan Rensing, Barry Smith & Dennis W. Stevenson - 2012 - American Journal of Botany 99 (8):1263–1275.
    Bio-ontologies are essential tools for accessing and analyzing the rapidly growing pool of plant genomic and phenomic data. Ontologies provide structured vocabularies to support consistent aggregation of data and a semantic framework for automated analyses and reasoning. They are a key component of the Semantic Web. This paper provides background on what bio-ontologies are, why they are relevant to botany, and the principles of ontology development. It includes an overview of ontologies and related resources that are relevant to plant science, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  4. Semantics in Support of Biodiversity: An Introduction to the Biological Collections Ontology and Related Ontologies.Ramona L. Walls, John Deck, Robert Guralnik, Steve Baskauf, Reed Beaman, Stanley Blum, Shawn Bowers, Pier Luigi Buttigieg, Neil Davies, Dag Endresen, Maria Alejandra Gandolfo, Robert Hanner, Alyssa Janning, Barry Smith & Others - 2014 - PLoS ONE 9 (3):1-13.
    The study of biodiversity spans many disciplines and includes data pertaining to species distributions and abundances, genetic sequences, trait measurements, and ecological niches, complemented by information on collection and measurement protocols. A review of the current landscape of metadata standards and ontologies in biodiversity science suggests that existing standards such as the Darwin Core terminology are inadequate for describing biodiversity data in a semantically meaningful and computationally useful way. Existing ontologies, such as the Gene Ontology and others in the Open (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5. The Plant Ontology facilitates comparisons of plant development stages across species.Ramona Lynn Walls, Laurel Cooper, Justin Lee Elser, Maria Alejandra Gandolfo, Christopher J. Mungall, Barry Smith, Dennis William Stevenson & Pankaj Jaiswal - 2019 - Frontiers in Plant Science 10.
    The Plant Ontology (PO) is a community resource consisting of standardized terms, definitions, and logical relations describing plant structures and development stages, augmented by a large database of annotations from genomic and phenomic studies. This paper describes the structure of the ontology and the design principles we used in constructing PO terms for plant development stages. It also provides details of the methodology and rationale behind our revision and expansion of the PO to cover development stages for all plants, particularly (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. A plant disease extension of the Infectious Disease Ontology.Ramona Walls, Barry Smith, Elser Justin, Goldfain Albert, W. Stevenson Dennis & Pankaj Jaiswal - 2012 - In Walls Ramona, Smith Barry, Justin Elser, Albert Goldfain & Stevenson Dennis W. (eds.), Proceeedings of the Third International Conference on Biomedical Ontology (CEUR 897). pp. 1-5.
    Plants from a handful of species provide the primary source of food for all people, yet this source is vulnerable to multiple stressors, such as disease, drought, and nutrient deficiency. With rapid population growth and climate uncertainty, the need to produce crops that can tolerate or resist plant stressors is more crucial than ever. Traditional plant breeding methods may not be sufficient to overcome this challenge, and methods such as highOthroughput sequencing and automated scoring of phenotypes can provide significant new (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7. The Plant Ontology: A common reference ontology for plants.L. Walls Ramona, D. Cooper Laurel, Elser Justin, W. Stevenson Dennis, Barry Smith, Mungall Chris, A. Gandolfo Maria & Jaiswal Pankaj - 2010 - In Walls Ramona L., Cooper Laurel D., Justin Elser, Stevenson Dennis W., Smith Barry, Chris Mungall, Gandolfo Maria A. & Pankaj Jaiswal (eds.), Proceedings of the Workshop on Bio-Ontologies, ISMB, Boston, July, 2010.
    The Plant Ontology (PO) (http://www.plantontology.org) (Jaiswal et al., 2005; Avraham et al., 2008) was designed to facilitate cross-database querying and to foster consistent use of plant-specific terminology in annotation. As new data are generated from the ever-expanding list of plant genome projects, the need for a consistent, cross-taxon vocabulary has grown. To meet this need, the PO is being expanded to represent all plants. This is the first ontology designed to encompass anatomical structures as well as growth and developmental stages (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Hume on Divine Amorality.Jerry L. Walls - 1990 - Religious Studies 26 (2):257 - 266.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Aurora nos recuerda a Adolfo. Entrevista de La Fuente a María Aurora Sánchez Rebolledo.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Rodrigo Walls Calatayud - 2021 - In José Ramón Fabelo-Corzo (ed.), Estética y Filosofía de la praxis. Homenaje a Adolfo Sánchez Vázquez. Puebla, Pue., México: Colección La Fuente. pp. 437-446.
    Buscando un acercamiento más íntimo a Adolfo Sánchez Vázquez como ser humano, integrante de una familia y educador, se realiza esta entrevista a María Aurora Sánchez Rebolledo, su hija. La misma fue realizada por José Ramón Fabelo Corzo y Rodrigo Walls Calatayud, en representación del equipo de Colección La Fuente, y tuvo lugar en noviembre de 2020, durante la época de confinamiento mundial debido a la pandemia por la COVID-19. La comunicación con Aurora se efectuó por medio de mensajes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. The law of crowds.Illan rua Wall - 2016 - Legal Studies 36 (3):395-414.
    From the Arab Spring and Occupy to the London riots and student tuition fee protests, the disordered crowd has re-emerged as a focal point of anxiety for law makers. The paper examines two recent cases where the UK courts have thought about crowds. In Austin, the House of Lords connected the crowd to an idea of human nature. This essentialist rendering placed the crowd within an old analytical register where it is understood to release a primordial violence. In Bauer, the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. The Plant Ontology as a Tool for Comparative Plant Anatomy and Genomic Analyses.Laurel Cooper, Ramona Walls, Justin Elser, Maria A. Gandolfo, Dennis W. Stevenson, Barry Smith & Others - 2013 - Plant and Cell Physiology 54 (2):1-23..
    The Plant Ontology (PO; http://www.plantontology.org/) is a publicly-available, collaborative effort to develop and maintain a controlled, structured vocabulary (“ontology”) of terms to describe plant anatomy, morphology and the stages of plant development. The goals of the PO are to link (annotate) gene expression and phenotype data to plant structures and stages of plant development, using the data model adopted by the Gene Ontology. From its original design covering only rice, maize and Arabidopsis, the scope of the PO has been expanded (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12. La estética, el arte y su reencuentro con la Academia.José Ramón Fabelo-Corzo & Rodrigo Walls Calatayud (eds.) - 2022 - Puebla: Colección La Fuente, BUAP – Instituto de Filosofía de La Habana.
    Con este volumen de la serie Academia y Egresados, la Colección La Fuente ofrece una compilación de trabajos de profesores, colaboradores y egresados de la Maestría en Estética y Arte (MEyA) de la BUAP. Preparado especialmente para ser presentado en el V Encuentro de Egresados de la MEyA (junio de 2022), la diversidad temática de las aportaciones que incluye el libro (estética y teoría del arte; historia del arte e instituciones artísticas; arte, ciencia y tecnología) reproduce el espectro de áreas (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. OBO Foundry in 2021: Operationalizing Open Data Principles to Evaluate Ontologies.Rebecca C. Jackson, Nicolas Matentzoglu, James A. Overton, Randi Vita, James P. Balhoff, Pier Luigi Buttigieg, Seth Carbon, Melanie Courtot, Alexander D. Diehl, Damion Dooley, William Duncan, Nomi L. Harris, Melissa A. Haendel, Suzanna E. Lewis, Darren A. Natale, David Osumi-Sutherland, Alan Ruttenberg, Lynn M. Schriml, Barry Smith, Christian J. Stoeckert, Nicole A. Vasilevsky, Ramona L. Walls, Jie Zheng, Christopher J. Mungall & Bjoern Peters - 2021 - BioaRxiv.
    Biological ontologies are used to organize, curate, and interpret the vast quantities of data arising from biological experiments. While this works well when using a single ontology, integrating multiple ontologies can be problematic, as they are developed independently, which can lead to incompatibilities. The Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies Foundry was created to address this by facilitating the development, harmonization, application, and sharing of ontologies, guided by a set of overarching principles. One challenge in reaching these goals was that the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14.  95
    Changes in product design and development processes: design thinking, service design and user experience.Federico Del Giorgio Solfa, Ticiana Agustina Alvarado Wall & Guido Amendolaggine - 2021 - Cuban Journal of Public and Business Administration 5 (3):e178.
    This article addresses the new theories and concepts of design management: design thinking, user experience (UX) and service design. They consider people's experiences and focus on the characteristics of each one of them. From industrial design, the scope and relationships between these definitions - now better visible - were analyzed, which always belonged to the design field of the discipline, from which an attempt was made to identify how they influence innovation, design and development of new products. To account for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  57
    New Paradigms for Product Design: Design Thinking, Service Design and User Experience.Federico Del Giorgio Solfa, Guido Amendolaggine & Ticiana Agustina Alvarado Wall - 2018 - Arte e Investigación 2018 (14):e012.
    in the present work we analyze the new concepts and theories related to the activity of Design Management, which focus on the experiences of people and the particular characteristics of each one of them. Specifically, from an Industrial Design perspective, the scope and relationships between these conceptual definitions —now made visible— that always belonged to the field of design of the discipline will be studied, trying to identify how they influence innovation and product development. Finally, it will conclude about its (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  73
    Strategic and participatory design in integrated ventures. Fitness case La Plata, Argentina.Federico Del Giorgio Solfa & Ticiana Agustina Alvarado Wall - 2021 - Designia 9 (1):17-37.
    The objective of this article is to analyze the relationships between theories of strategic design and participatory design, in multiple commercial alliances between local entrepreneurs from different sectors and their integrated application in the urban context. Various authors have dealt with these strategic issues in isolation and less frequently have addressed them from the entrepreneurial experience. A review of the specific literature allows us to account for the main concepts involved in this approach. The case being analyzed refers to a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Dividing Walls and Unifying Murals: Diego Rivera and John Dewey on the Restoration of Art within Life.Terrance MacMullan - 2012 - Inter-American Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):44-59.
    English Abstract In Art as Experience, John Dewey decried the estrangement of art from lived human experience, both by artificial conceptual walls and the physical walls that secluded art within museums. Instead he argued that making and enjoying art are crucial organic functions that sustain communities and integrate individuals within their environments. In the 1920’s Diego Rivera became one of the luminaries of the Mexican muralist movement by creating frescoes that were rooted in Mexican life, both in their (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Wall-Window-Screen: How the Cell Phone Mediates a Worldview for Us.Galit Wellner - 2011 - Humanities and Technology Review 30:87-103.
    The article proposes to model the phenomenon of the cell phone as a wall-window. This model aims at explicating some of the perceptions and experiences associated with cellular technology. The wall-window model means that the cell phone simultaneously separates the user from the physical surroundings (the wall), and connects the user to a remote space (the window). The remote space may be where the interlocutor resides or where information is stored (e.g. the Internet). Most cell phone usage patterns are modeled (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  19. Paying People to Risk Life or Limb.Robert C. Hughes - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (3):295-316.
    Does the content of a physically dangerous job affect the moral permissibility of hiring for that job? To what extent may employers consider costs in choosing workplace safety measures? Drawing on Kantian ethical theory, this article defends two strong ethical standards of workplace safety. First, the content of a hazardous job does indeed affect the moral permissibility of offering it. Unless employees need hazard pay to meet basic needs, it is permissible to offer a dangerous job only if prospective employees (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  20. Occupy Wall: A Mereological Puzzle and the Burdens of Endurantism.Paul Richard Daniels - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):91-101.
    Endurantists have recently faced a mereological puzzle in various forms. Here I argue that, instead of presenting a genuine worry, the puzzle actually reveals a common misunderstanding about the endurantist ontology. Furthermore, through this discussion of the alleged problem and the misunderstanding which motivates it, I reveal metaphysical commitments the endurantist has that may not be widely recognized. For instance, she is committed to interesting and perhaps controversial views about shape and location. I highlight these commitments and what they mean (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  21.  24
    Wall Shear Stress and its Causality in Cerebral Aneurysm Development.Rowena Kong - manuscript
    In a recent case-control study by Zimny et al. (2021), the development of unruptured cerebral artery aneurysm can be reasonably traced to the combined factor of high wall shear stress and wall shear stress gradient. In addition, regions of bifurcation apices with such factor of significant wall shear stress are critical in aneurysm formation. A consideration of directional and spatial changes in opposition against the inertia and seamless hemodynamic blood flow in approaching the juncture of bifurcation apex that increase interaction (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Scepticism about Beneficiary Pays: A Critique.Christian Barry & Robert Kirby - 2015 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4):285-300.
    Some moral theorists argue that being an innocent beneficiary of significant harms inflicted by others may be sufficient to ground special duties to address the hardships suffered by the victims, at least when it is impossible to extract compensation from those who perpetrated the harm. This idea has been applied to climate change in the form of the beneficiary-pays principle. Other philosophers, however, are quite sceptical about beneficiary pays. Our aim in this article is to examine their critiques. We conclude (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  23. Equal Pay for All: An Idea Whose Time Has Not, and Will Not, Come.Thomas Mulligan - 2021 - In Anders Örtenblad (ed.), Debating Equal Pay for All: Economy, Practicability and Ethics. Palgrave macmillan. pp. 21-35.
    The proposal on offer is a radical form of egalitarianism. Under it, each citizen receives the same income, regardless of profession or indeed whether he or she works or not. This proposal is bad for two reasons. First, it is inefficient. It would eliminate nearly all incentive to work, thereby shrinking national income and leaving all citizens poorly off (albeit equally poorly off). I illustrate this inefficiency via an indifference curve analysis. Second, the proposal would be regarded as unjust by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Theology Without Walls: A New Mode of Spiritual Engagement.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    Theology Without Walls - or 'trans-religious theology' - is a theological approach dedicated to reflecting upon the nature of divine reality as it may be revealed in any of the world’s religious traditions, without confining itself to any one in particular. In this paper I discuss some of the basic assumptions and implications of the Theology Without Walls project and suggest that this approach to theology, and to religion in general, promises to help resolve antagonisms and divisions that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Compensation for Cures: Paying People to Participate in Challenge Studies.Jonathan Anomaly & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (7):792-797.
    Antibiotic resistance is one of the most pressing public health problems humanity faces. Research into new classes of antibiotics and new kinds of treatments – including risky experimental treatments such as phage therapy and vaccines – is an important part of improving our ability to treat infectious diseases. In order to aid this research, we will argue that we should permit researchers to pay people any amount of money to compensate for the risks of participating in clinical trials, including ‘challenge (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  26. Paying for Plasma: Commodification, Exploitation, and Canada's Plasma Shortage.Vida Panitch & Lendell Chad Horne - 2019 - Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique 2 (2):1-10.
    A private, for-profit company has recently opened a pair of plasma donation centres in Canada, at which donors can be compensated up to $50 for their plasma. This has sparked a nation-wide debate around the ethics of paying plasma donors. Our aim in this paper is to shift the terms of the current debate away from the question of whether plasma donors should be paid and toward the question of who should be paying them. We consider arguments against paying plasma (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27. Four Walls and a Roof Do Not Form a House. [REVIEW]Paul van Els - 2003 - China Nu 28:34–35.
    van Els, Paul. "Vier muren en een dak vormen geen huis" (Four Walls and a Roof Do Not Form a House). Review of 25 eeuwen oosterse filosofie, edited by Jan Bor and Karel van der Leeuw. China Nu 28, no. 4 (2003): 34–35.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. In Spirit and Truth: Toward a Theology Without Walls.Richard Oxenberg - 2019 - In Jerry L. Martin (ed.), Theology without walls: The transreligious imperative. Taylor and Francis. pp. 14-24.
    Theology Without Walls is a project that seeks to understand the nature of divine reality through an exploration of all the world's religious traditions, without confining itself to any one in particular. In this essay, I discuss why theology has traditionally been done within the boundaries of specific traditions and suggest that, in our time, we are called to a new, more comprehensive, approach to theology.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Dispatch from Occupy Wall Street.Jennifer K. Uleman - 2011 - Feminist Wire (Oct 17).
    A dispatch from Zuccotti Park about what being there was like, about the signs I liked (and those I didn't), and about Occupy's importance.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Equal pay as a precondition of justice?Daniel Pointon & Matthew Sinnicks - 2021 - In Anders Örtenblad (ed.), Debating Equal Pay for All: Economy, Practicability and Ethics. Palgrave macmillan. pp. 255-266.
    Equality is typically presumed to be an end of justice; however, in this chapter, we argue that it is better understood as a condition of justice. Our argument draws on the Just World Fallacy, the phenomenon of people mistakenly believing fortuitous patterns of reward or harm to be reflective of justice. This phenomenon can undermine relationships of equality even where differences in reward or harm are ostensibly deserved. If everyone received equal pay, then the propensity for people to defer to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Bullshit in Politics Pays.Adam F. Gibbons - forthcoming - Episteme:1-21.
    Politics is full of people who don’t care about the facts. Still, while not caring about the facts, they are often concerned to present themselves as caring about them. Politics, in other words, is full of bullshitters. But why? In this paper I develop an incentives-based analysis of bullshit in politics, arguing that it is often a rational response to the incentives facing different groups of agents. In a slogan: bullshit in politics pays, sometimes literally. After first outlining an account (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  32. Paying attention to attention: psychological realism and the attention economy.Dylan J. White - 2024 - Synthese 203 (2):1-22.
    In recent years, philosophers have identified a number of moral and psychological harms associated with the attention economy (Alysworth & Castro, 2021; Castro & Pham, 2020; Williams, 2018). Missing from many of these accounts of the attention economy, however, is what exactly attention is. As a result of this neglect of the cognitive science of attention, many of these accounts are not empirically credible. They rely on oversimplified and unsophisticated accounts of not only attention, but self- control, and addiction as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Making our children pay for mitigation.Aaron Maltais - 2015 - In Aaron Maltais & Catriona McKinnon (eds.), The Ethics of Climate Governance. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. pp. 91-109.
    Investments in mitigating climate change have their greatest environmental impact over the long term. As a consequence the incentives to invest in cutting greenhouse gas emissions today appear to be weak. In response to this challenge, there has been increasing attention given to the idea that current generations can be motivated to start financing mitigation at much higher levels today by shifting these costs to the future through national debt. Shifting costs to the future in this way benefits future generations (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  34. Is the beneficiary pays principle essential in climate justice?Clare Heyward - 2021 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 56 (2-3):125-136.
    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change principle of ‘common but differentiated responsibility’ admits many interpretations. In the philosophical literature on climate justice, it has typically been cashed out in terms of the following three principles: the ability to pay principle (APP), the beneficiary pays principle (BPP), and the contribution to problem principle (CPP). Many of these accounts have given prominence to the CPP and APP, but there are some who argue that the BPP deserves greater consideration. In this (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Who pays attention to the moral aspects? Role of organizational justice and moral attentiveness in leveraging ethical behavior.Hussam Al Halbusi - 2022 - International Journal of Ethics and Systems 38:1-23.
    Purpose – Although there have been several studies on corporate justice and employee ethical behavior, little is known about the conditions in which this link develops. The purpose of this study is to investigate the direct effect of organizational justice and moral attentiveness toward employee ethical behavior. Importantly, this study also considers the moderating role of moral attentiveness on the links between organizational justice and employee ethical behavior. -/- Design/methodology/approach – The data was collected from 350 employees who were assessed (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Paying for the Possibility of Disease: How Medicalization of Risk Conditions Affects Health Policy and Why We Must Bear It In Mind.Alison Reiheld - 2008 - Medical Humanities Report:3, 4, 6.
    In this paper, I sound a warning note about the medicalization of risk conditions such as high cholesterol, especially in a health care climate of resource scarcity.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. Exploring visitors' willingness to pay to generate revenues for managing the National Elephant Conservation Center in Malaysia.Maynard Clark - 2015 - Forest Policy and Economics 56 (C):9-19.
    Financial sustainability of protected areas is one of the main challenges of management. Financial self-sufficiency is an important element in improving conservation effort in these areas. This study seeks to review best practices in recreational fee systems in different countries and to find a relevant entry fee for a wildlife sanctuary in Malaysia. The revenue of the National Elephant Conservation Center (NECC) in Kuala Gandah, Malaysia, comes from several sources, including the national government, but all these budgetary sources are strained (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Walking Through The Turing Wall.Albert Efimov - 2021 - IFAC Papers Online 54 (13):215-220.
    Can the machines that play board games or recognize images only in the comfort of the virtual world be intelligent? To become reliable and convenient assistants to humans, machines need to learn how to act and communicate in the physical reality, just like people do. The authors propose two novel ways of designing and building Artificial General Intelligence (AGI). The first one seeks to unify all participants at any instance of the Turing test – the judge, the machine, the human (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. “What Good is Wall Street?” Institutional Contradiction and the Diffusion of the Stigma over the Finance Industry.Thomas Roulet - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):389-402.
    The concept of organizational stigma has received significant attention in recent years. The theoretical literature suggests that for a stigma to emerge over a category of organizations, a “critical mass” of actors sharing the same beliefs should be reached. Scholars have yet to empirically examine the techniques used to diffuse this negative judgment. This study is aimed at bridging this gap by investigating Goffman’s notion of “stigma-theory”: how do stigmatizing actors rationalize and emotionalize their beliefs to convince their audience? We (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  40. Walking Through the Turing Wall.Albert Efimov - forthcoming - In Teces.
    Can the machines that play board games or recognize images only in the comfort of the virtual world be intelligent? To become reliable and convenient assistants to humans, machines need to learn how to act and communicate in the physical reality, just like people do. The authors propose two novel ways of designing and building Artificial General Intelligence (AGI). The first one seeks to unify all participants at any instance of the Turing test – the judge, the machine, the human (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Allocating the Burdens of Climate Action: Consumption-Based Carbon Accounting and the Polluter-Pays Principle.Ross Mittiga - 2018 - In Beth Edmondson & Stuart Levy (eds.), Transformative Climates and Accountable Governance. Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 157-194.
    Action must be taken to combat climate change. Yet, how the costs of climate action should be allocated among states remains a question. One popular answer—the polluter-pays principle (PPP)—stipulates that those responsible for causing the problem should pay to address it. While intuitively plausible, the PPP has been subjected to withering criticism in recent years. It is timely, following the Paris Agreement, to develop a new version: one that does not focus on historical production-based emissions but rather allocates climate burdens (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  42. Ageing and the Pay-as-you-go (PAYG) Pension System’s Asset-liability (Mis)Matching.József Banyár - 2019 - In Łukasz Tomczyk & Andrzej Klimczuk (eds.), Between Successful and Unsuccessful Ageing: Selected Aspects and Contexts. Kraków: Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny w Krakowie. pp. 163–206.
    The study present how in the late 1930s-1940s a new, modern pension system was introduced in America without any theoretical basis, as a kind of arbitrary mix of existing pension systems, to replace the by then non-functioning “traditional pension system” in which working children maintained their ageing parents in exchange for having been raised. Later, in 1958, they found an ideology for the system, “solidarity between generations,” but this didn’t fit in with the system’s economic foundations, with the fact that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  85
    Exploring Italian Consumers’ Willingness to Pay for Sustainable Fashion: The Roles of Eco-Consciousness and Vintage Preference.Minh-Hoang Nguyen, Minh-Phuong Thi Duong, Thien-Vu Tran, Hong-Hue Thi Nguyen, Thi Mai Anh Tran & Quan-Hoang Vuong - manuscript
    Studying the psychology behind the purchase of eco-friendly products and second-hand items can offer valuable insights to promote sustainable consumer behavior. This paper examines factors influencing Italian consumers’ willingness to pay regarding bio-based clothing and second-hand items. Drawing from data collected from 402 Italian participants, we examine how motivations and socio-demographic factors are associated with willingness to pay in the context of sustainable fashion. Our findings reveal that motivations related to environmental concerns are positively associated with consumers’ willingness to pay (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. U.S. Border Wall.Kim Díaz - 2010 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 17 (1):1-12.
    Drawing on the work of John Rawls and Thomas Pogge, I argue that the U.S. is in part responsible for the immigration of Mexicans and Central Americans into the U.S. By seeking to further its national interests through its foreign policies, the U.S. has created economic and politically oppressive conditions that Mexican and Central American people seek to escape. The significance of this project is to highlight the role of the U.S. in illegal immigration so that we may first acknowledge (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45. Post-Turing Methodology: Breaking the Wall on the Way to Artificial General Intelligence.Albert Efimov - 2020 - Lecture Notes in Computer Science 12177.
    This article offers comprehensive criticism of the Turing test and develops quality criteria for new artificial general intelligence (AGI) assessment tests. It is shown that the prerequisites A. Turing drew upon when reducing personality and human consciousness to “suitable branches of thought” re-flected the engineering level of his time. In fact, the Turing “imitation game” employed only symbolic communication and ignored the physical world. This paper suggests that by restricting thinking ability to symbolic systems alone Turing unknowingly constructed “the wall” (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  46. “From Museum Walls to Facebook Walls”*. A new public space for art.Gizela Horvath - 2014 - In Gizela Horvath, Rozalia Klara Bako & Eva Biro Kaszas (eds.), Ten Years of Facebook. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Argumentation and Rhetoric. Partium Kiado. pp. 73-88.
    The ‘museal’ approach to art has been attacked from many angles in the last decade; the main issue raised by most of these attacks was that such an approach would promote a certain idea of art which has little to do with real-life or the layman’s interest. Some artists have protested by stepping out of the museum space with projects deliberately designed as non-museum items (performance, land-art, public art etc.). Art, however, is always meant for a public, so, as an (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47. Giving Executives Their Due: Just Pay, Desert and Equality.Alexander Andersson - 2021 - Dissertation, University of Gothenburg
    Before, during, and after the global financial crisis of 2008, executive pay practices were widely debated and criticized. Economists, philosophers, as well as the man on the street all seem to have strong feelings towards how much, in what ways, and on what grounds executives are paid. This thesis asks whether it is possible to morally justify current executive pay practices and, if so, on what grounds they are justified. It questions those who find no quarrel with pay practices due (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Temperature fluctuations and moisture level in external walls. Case study Tirana, Albania.Xhexhi Klodjan - 2023 - American Journal of Engineering Research (AJER) 12 (2):65-72.
    The incorporation of thermal insulation materials into building walls is a novel strategy for reducing heating and cooling energy consumption. Nowadays, the issues of energy production, consumption, and energy storage have become global problems. Furthermore, the thermal insulation of buildings increases the thermal comfort of residential premises in order to save energy. The use of several kinds of thermal insulation materials is required in the construction sector. This paper compares the thermal and moisture performance of two different types of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. ‘‘ ‘The Polluter Pays’: Backward-looking principles of intergenerational Justice and the environment.Daniel Butt - 2013 - In Luc Foisneau, Jean-Christophe Merle, Christian Hiebaum & Carlos Velasco Juan (eds.), Spheres of Global Justice. pp. 757-774.
    This paper provides theoretical support for two historical principles for the allocation of remedial responsibility for paying the costs of pollution caused by humans. These remedial principles are based upon particular forms of backward-looking connection with the pollution in question. The suggestion is that we can have reasons to pay the costs of pollution when we are members of communities which were responsible for the original polluting acts in question and/or which have benefited from the polluting acts. In seeking to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. How Much Should Governments Pay to Prevent Catastrophes? Longtermism's Limited Role.Carl Shulman & Elliott Thornley - forthcoming - In Jacob Barrett, Hilary Greaves & David Thorstad (eds.), Essays on Longtermism. Oxford University Press.
    Longtermists have argued that humanity should significantly increase its efforts to prevent catastrophes like nuclear wars, pandemics, and AI disasters. But one prominent longtermist argument overshoots this conclusion: the argument also implies that humanity should reduce the risk of existential catastrophe even at extreme cost to the present generation. This overshoot means that democratic governments cannot use the longtermist argument to guide their catastrophe policy. In this paper, we show that the case for preventing catastrophe does not depend on longtermism. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
1 — 50 / 879