Results for 'Sikh scripture'

306 found
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  1. Vice and Virtue in Sikh Ethics.Keshav Singh - 2021 - The Monist 104 (3):319-336.
    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in analytic philosophy that engages with non-Western philosophical traditions, including South Asian religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. However, thus far, there has been no engagement with Sikhism, despite its status as a major world religion with a rich philosophical tradition. This paper is an attempt to get a start at analytic philosophical engagement with Sikh philosophy. My focus is on Sikh ethics, and in particular on the theory of (...)
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  2. Human Rights – A Core Concern in Sikh Doctrines (Part II).Devinder Pal Singh - 2022 - The Sikh Review, Kolkata, WB, India 70 (09):19-29.
    Sikhism is the world's fifth-largest religion. It was founded during the late 15th century in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent. Its adherents are known as Sikhs. Currently, there are about 30 million Sikhs worldwide. Most of them live in the Indian state of Punjab. As per Sikh tradition, Sikhism was established by Guru Nanak (1469–1539) and subsequently led by a succession of nine other Gurus. Before his death, the tenth Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh (1666–1708), bestowed (...)
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  3. Human Rights - A Core Concern in Sikh Doctrines (Part III).Devinder Pal Singh - 2022 - The Sikh Review, Kolkata, WB, India 70 (10):25-33.
    Sikhism is the world's fifth-largest religion. It was founded during the late 15th century in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent. Its adherents are known as Sikhs. Currently, there are about 30 million Sikhs worldwide. Most of them live in the Indian state of Punjab. As per Sikh tradition, Sikhism was established by Guru Nanak (1469–1539) and subsequently led by a succession of nine other Gurus. Before his death, the tenth Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh (1666–1708), bestowed (...)
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  4. Human Rights – A Core Concern in Sikh Doctrines (Part I).Devinder Pal Singh - 2022 - The Sikh Review, Kolkata, WB, India 70 (8):31-39.
    Sikhism is the world's fifth-largest religion. It was founded during the late 15th century in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent. Its adherents are known as Sikhs. Currently, there are about 30 million Sikhs worldwide. Most of them live in the Indian state of Punjab. As per Sikh tradition, Sikhism was established by Guru Nanak (1469–1539) and subsequently led by a succession of nine other Gurus. Before his death, the tenth SikhGuru, Guru Gobind Singh (1666–1708), bestowed the status (...)
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  5. Dr. Devinder Singh Sekhon – An Eminent Sikh Scholar devoted to the Sikh Cause.Devinder Pal Singh - 2023 - The Sikh Review, Kolkata, WB, India 71 (2):49-56.
    Dr. Devinder Singh Sekhon served as a Chemistry/Educational Administration professor at various colleges/Universities in Alberta and British Columbia, Canada. Presently, living in Windsor, Canada, he is actively contributing to the fields of Science, Religion, and Literature. Despite being a noted chemist and educationist, he is interested in sharing his insights about religion and science. Due to this keen dedication to sharing his understanding of Sikhi doctrines with all, he authored seven books on various aspects of the Sikh way of (...)
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  6. Prime Environmental Teachings of Sikhism.Devinder Pal Singh - 2021 - Sikh Philosophy Network.
    Sri Guru Granth Sahib, the holy scripture of the Sikhs, contains numerous references to the worship of the divine in Nature. The Sikh scripture declares that human beings' purpose is to achieve a blissful state and be in harmony with the Earth and all creation. Millions of Sikhs recite Gurbani daily wherein the divine is remembered using the symbolism from Nature, esp. air, water, sun, moon, trees, animals, and the Earth. The human mind loses communion with Nature (...)
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  7. Impermanence of Things - A Gurbani Perspective.Devinder Pal Singh - 2012 - Understanding Sikhism - The Research Journal 14 (1-2):67-69.
    Everything is subject to change and alteration in the world. There is nothing that is fixed and permanent. Existence is a flux and a continuous becoming. In Aad Guru Granth Sahib (AGGS), the holy Sikh scripture, the concept of impermanence of things is enunciated to make us aware of the ephemeral nature of life and the material world. It articulates that the awareness and understanding of the impermanent nature of things lead to liberation from the sorrows of human (...)
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  8. Human Rights – A Perspective from Sikhism.Devinder Pal Singh - 2023 - In Yashwant Pathak & Adit Adityanjee (eds.), Human Rights, Religious Freedom and Spirituality: Perspectives from the Dharmic and Indigenous Cultures. Bhishma Prakashan. pp. 172-191.
    Sikhism is the world's fifth-largest religion. It was founded during the late 15th century in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent. Its adherents are known as Sikhs. Currently, there are about 30 million Sikhs worldwide. Most of them live in the Indian state of Punjab. As per Sikh tradition, Sikhism was established by Guru Nanak (1469–1539) and subsequently led by a succession of nine other Gurus. Before his death, the tenth Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh (1666–1708), bestowed (...)
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  9. Philosophy of Life of Sri Guru Gobind Singh Ji.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2018 - Lokayata: Journal of Positive Philosophy 2 (VIII):61-66.
    Sikhism is a monotheistic religion founded during the 15th century in the Punjab region, by Guru Nanak Dev and continued to progress with ten successive Sikh gurus (the last teaching being the holy scripture Gurū Granth Sāhib Ji). It is the fifth-largest organized religion in the world, with over 30 million Sikhs and one of the most steadily growing. This system of religious philosophy and expression has been traditionally known as the Gurmat (literally 'of the gurus'). The (...) Scriptures outline the ways in which one can bring their own thinking in line with the Hukam. If one engages in the service of God's creation, this is the best way of working in harmony with the Divine Will. Further, by remembering Waheguru one becomes aware of "God desires" and "Divine essence" within the person is realised. By following these "Divine Values" that benefit His Creation, one ends the cycle of Karma and Transmigration. The objective of this paper is to study the basic life values taught by Sri Guru Gobind Singh ji. (shrink)
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  10. Ecological Concerns in Sri Guru Granth Sahib.Devinder Pal Singh - 2010 - The Sikh Review 12 (4):10-19.
    At present, amid a technological revolution, humanity is facing significant challenges for its survival. Ecological crisis is one of the gravest among these. There is a severe concern that the Earth may no longer be a sustainable biosystem. Although human beings are seen as the most intelligent life form on Earth, yet they are responsible for almost all the ecological damage done to the planet. According to the Sikh scripture, Sri Guru Granth Sahib (SGGS) [1-2], humans create their (...)
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  11. POTHI PARMESAR KA THAAN.Devinder Pal Singh - 2015 - Understanding Sikhism 17:69-75.
    Pothi, a popular Punjabi word, means a book. Among the Sikhs, however, pothi signifies a sacred book, especially one containing Gurbani or scriptural text. Although the word is used even for the Aad Granth in the index of the original recession prepared by Guru Arjan. He probably alluding to the Aad Granth pronounces pothi to be "the abode of God" for it contains "complete knowledge of God" (AGGS, p1226). However, in Aad Guru Granth Sahib (AGGS) [8, 17], the word ‘pothi’ (...)
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  12. Imperative Lessons from Nature - A Gurbani Perspective.Devinder Pal Singh - 2021 - The Sikh Review 69 (9):13-22.
    Nature, a treasure trove of wisdom, is a great teacher of amazingly priceless life lessons to live a happy and worthwhile life. It speaks to us through its various phenomena. Gurbani helps us to decode Nature's invaluable lessons. Gurbani enunciates that Nature helps us to develop compassion and inner balance. It also guides us to help others to lead better lives. The interplay of five classical elements - air, water, fire, earth, and akasha is the fundamental cause of all-natural phenomena. (...)
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  13. Environmental Concerns in Guru Granth Sahib.Devinder Pal Singh - 2010 - The Sikh Review 58 (3):16-22.
    All the biotic and abiotic factors that act on an organism, population, or ecological community and influence its survival and development constitute its environment. Biotic factors include the organisms themselves, their food, and their interactions. Abiotic factors include such items as sunlight, soil, air, water, climate, and pollution. Organisms respond to changes in their environment by evolutionary adaptations in form and behaviour. At present humanity is facing great challenges for its survival as both these factors have come under great stress (...)
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  14. Holistic Vision of Sri Guru Tegh Bahadur Ji (Part -I).Devinder Pal Singh - 2021 - The Sikh Review 69 (5):12-21.
    Sri Guru Tegh Bahadur, ninth Sikh Guru, fell as a martyr to the freedom of consciousness and belief [1]. The Guru's great sacrifice was to vindicate the people's right to profess and practice their faith. It meant the assertion of the principle of justice for which the ruling Mughal rulers of the day had very scant regard. For this reason, the life, career, and teachings of Guru Tegh Bahadur are of immense significance even in contemporary times, when the forces (...)
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  15. Sikhism and Islam: The Inter-Relationship.Devinder Pal Singh - 2019 - Punjab De Rang 13 (4):5-28.
    Sikhism, the fifth-largest organized religion in the world, was founded in the fifteenth century in Punjab, India. Guru Nanak Dev and his successor Sikh Gurus established this system of religious philosophy. The sacred scripture, Sri Guru Granth Sahib, is the present Guru of the Sikhs. The religious philosophy of Sikhism is traditionally known as Gurmat. Sikhism originated from the word Sikh, having the Sanskrit root śiṣya meaning "disciple" or "learner." With about 27 million followers or 0.39% of (...)
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  16. Good Governance - A Perspective from Sri Guru Granth Sahib.Devinder Pal Singh - 2022 - The Sikh Bulletin, USA 24 (1):11-15.
    Governance includes the processes by which organizations are directed, controlled and held to account. Excellence can be achieved when good governance principles and practices are applied throughout the entire organization. Various forms of governance are in vogue. Ethical governance demands that public officials stick to high moral standards while serving others. Authentic governance necessitates the systematic process of continuous, gradual, and routine personal and corporate improvement that leads to sustainable high performance. Thus it represents the ability to discern right from (...)
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  17. Good Governance - A Perspective from Sri Guru Granth Sahib.Devinder Pal Singh - 2020 - In Proc. International Conference on Contemporary Issues & Challenges to Polity & Governance in India: Emerging Paradigm Shifts & Future Agenda, Govt. Mohindra College, Patiala, Punjab, India. 17-18 February,. Patiala, Punjab, India: pp. 26-30.
    Governance encompasses the processes by which organizations are directed, controlled and held to account. It includes the authority, accountability, leadership, direction, and control exercised in an organization. Greatness can be achieved when good governance principles and practices are applied throughout the whole organization. Ethical Governance requires that public officials adhere to high moral standards while serving others. Authentic Governance entails the systematic process of continuous, gradual, and routine personal/corporate improvement, steering, and learning that lead to sustainable high personal/corporate performance and (...)
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  18.  89
    Sangat, Saadh Sangat and Sat Sangat – A Gurbani Perspective.Devinder Pal Singh - 2023 - The Sikh Review, Kolkata, WB, India 71 (7):27-31.
    Sangat is a term derived from the root word "sang," meaning association or to accompany travelers on pilgrimage. It also relates to assembly, company, fellowship, congregation, meeting, or union. The word sangat refers only to fellowship but does not necessarily refer to the merits or traits of associates. Sangat: In the Sikh religion, the Sangat term is used to refer to the community of people who gather to worship and support each other in their spiritual journey. Through the Sangat, (...)
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  19. Interdependence of Things: A Gurbani Perspective.Devinder Pal Singh - 2009 - The Sikh Review 51 (11):11-14.
    Any two things, living or non-living, countries or nations that cooperate with each other are said to be interdependent or mutually dependent. Interdependence means interconnectedness and reliance on one another socially, economically, environmentally and politically. It is a dynamic of being mutually and physically responsible for and sharing a common set of principles. Some people advocate independence as a sort of ultimate good; others do the same with devotion to their family, community, or society. Interdependence recognizes the truth in each (...)
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  20. Religious Practices and Democratic Values in India: A Search for Interreligious Dialogue.Sirswal Desh Raj - 2017 - In Raj Sirswal Desh (ed.), Proceedings of National Seminar on World Religions: A Step Towards Inter Religious Dialogue.
    India has a long, rich, and diverse tradition of philosophical thoughts, spanning some two and a half millennia and encompassing several major religious traditions. India’s democracy can be said to rest on the foundation of religious practice due to the practice of multi-religions and different sects in its continent. Religious practices ties among citizens that generate positive and democratic political outcomes if we see it from the ideals of any religious doctrine as per their written scripture. But in society (...)
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  21. Formulating Methodology for Interpreting Gurbani.Devinder Pal Singh - 2013 - Understanding Sikhism - The Research Journal 15 (1-2).
    The process by which theological texts are understood relies on a particular hermeneutical viewpoint. In the interpretation of a text, hermeneutics considers the original medium as well as what language says, supposes, doesn't say, and implies. The process consists of several steps for attaining the best of the Scriptural author's intended meaning(s). Some important steps are outlined in the article.
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  22. Nanakian Perspective on World Peace and Brotherhood of Humankind.Devinder Pal Singh - 2020 - In Sucha Singh Gill (ed.), Philosophy of Guru Nanak Searching Peace, Harmony & Happiness. Chandigarh, India: Centre for Research in Rural and Industrial Development. pp. 177-192.
    Sikhism, a panentheistic religion, originated in the Punjab province of the Indian subcontinent, during the 15th century. It is one of the youngest and fifth major world religions, founded by Guru Nanak. The fundamental beliefs of Nanakian Philosophy have been enshrined in the sacred scripture, Sri Guru Granth Sahib. These beliefs include faith in and meditation on one universal creator, unity of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, striving for social justice for all, honest livelihood and ethical conduct while (...)
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  23.  97
    The Doctrine of World Peace and Universal Fellowship in the Hymns of Guru Nanak.Devinder Pal Singh - 2019 - Punjab Dey Rang 13 (4):5-11.
    Sikhism, a panentheistic religion, originated in the Punjab province of the Indian subcontinent during the 15th century. It is one of the youngest and fifth major world religions. The fundamental beliefs of Sikhism have been enshrined in the sacred scripture, Sri Guru Granth Sahib. These beliefs include faith in and meditation on one universal creator, unity of all humankind, engaging in selfless service, striving for social justice for all, honest livelihood and ethical conduct while living a householder's life. Sikhism (...)
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  24. Cosmology in Guru Nanak's Holistic Vision.Devinder Pal Singh - 1998 - The Sikh Review 46 (11):16-22.
    In these days of advanced science and technology, religion is still the greatest single factor influencing people. For the Western people, religion still has the original Latin meaning - to bind or a relationship. But for the people of the East, religion is Dharma, support and a way of life. The study of religious concepts is essential for it guides and enriches the social and individual life of the people. The doctrine of every religion consists of some basic concepts resulting (...)
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  25. Natural Symbolism in Sri Guru Granth Sahib.Devinder Pal Singh - 2022 - Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Research 4 (2):104-110.
    Symbolism, as a literary device, is widely employed in the scriptures of almost all religions. Understanding the use of symbolism in a scripture enables us to comprehend and appreciate the intended message of the scripture’s author in a better way. The poetic compositions of Sri Guru Granth Sahib (SGGS) are notable for their richness, and various images and symbols used to tell its authors’ mystical and spiritual experiences. These compositions aptly use natural symbolism to describe humanity’s diverse physical (...)
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  26. A Scriptural Pragmatism: : Jewish Philosophy's Conception of Truth.Peter Ochs - 1986 - International Philosophical Quarterly 26 (2):131-135.
    In HEBREW SCRIPTURES, in rabbinic literature and for most Jewish thinkers, "truth" (emet) is a character of personal relationships. Truth is fidelity to one's word, keeping promises, saying with the lips what one says in one's heart, bearing witness to what one has seen. Truth is the bond of trust between persons and between God and Humanity. In Western philosophic tradition, however, truth is a character of the claims people make about the world they experience: the correspondence between a statement (...)
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  27. On Nurturing Sikh Values Among Young People.Devinder Pal Singh - 2022 - The Sikh Review 70 (4):6-8.
    Sikh Gurus' spiritual wisdom is universal. It is applicable to all, regardless of caste, creed, color, gender, age, and religion. But it is sad to note that a large numbers of Sikh children are not motivated enough to follow Sikh values. Many young people are addicted to alcohol, drugs, substance abuse and social media due to prevalent societal fashion or peer pressure. Unfortunately, Sikhs are ignoring this facet of their community life. However, there is no shortage of (...)
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  28. Science — Religion Dialogue: A Sikh Perspective.Devinder Pal Singh - 2021 - The Sikh Review 69 (2):11-25.
    Science and religion are based on different aspects of human experience. Science is a way of knowing and understanding the natural world, using empirical evidence and testable explanations. Religious faith does not depend only on empirical evidence and typically involves supernatural forces or entities. Thus, science and religion are separate and address the aspects of human understanding in different ways. The dialogue between science and religion is productive from a theological point of view since the world-environment in which the theologians (...)
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  29. Philosophic warrants for scriptural reasoning.Peter Ochs - 2006 - Modern Theology 22 (3):465-482.
    Scriptural Reasoning (SR) is a practice of philosophic theology that is offered as a rationally warranted albeit fallible response to the inadequacies of modern liberal and anti-liberal theologies whether they are adopted as academic projects or as dimensions of lived religious practice. In terms of everyday religious practice in the West today, SR may be characterized as an effort, at once, to help protect Abrahamic folk traditions (that is, of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam) from the cultural and theological effects of (...)
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  30. An Eminent Sikh Historian and Profound Scholar of Religion - Dr. Balwant Singh Dhillon.Devinder Pal Singh - 2021 - Sikh Philosophy Network.
    Prof. (Dr.) Balwant Singh Dhillon, a much-acclaimed Sikh-historian, a dedicated researcher, a prolific writer, and a profound scholar of religion, was born in 1950, at Village Ran Singh Wala, District Faridkot, Punjab, India. With his keen interest in learning, he received a B.A. degree from SGGS College, Chandigarh, in 1972, and an M.A. (History) degree from the University of Rajasthan, Jaipur in 1974. During his younger days, he nurtured a keen interest in sports. On attaining the National Level Athlete (...)
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  31. The use of scripture in the beast machine controversy.Lloyd Strickland - 2015 - In David Beck (ed.), Knowing Nature in Early Modern Europe. Brookfield, Vermont: Pickering & Chatto. pp. 65-82.
    The impression we are often given by historians of philosophy is that the readiness of medieval philosophers to appeal to authorities, such as The Bible, the Church, and Aristotle, was not shared by many early modern philosophers, for whom there was a marked preference to look for illumination via experience, the exercise of reason, or a combination of the two. Although this may be accurate, broadly speaking, it is notable that, in spite of the waning enthusiasm for deferring to traditional (...)
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  32. Scriptural logic: Diagrams for a postcritical metaphysics.Peter Ochs - 1995 - Modern Theology 11 (1):65-92.
    You ask if metaphysics is possible after modernity, or after Barth and Wittgenstein and Derrida and the critique of foundationalism? May I invite you, by way of response, to listen in on a conversation? It is a dialogue between what I will call a postcritical philosopher ("P") and a postcritical scriptural theologian —— I'll label the latter a "textualist" ("T"). What I mean by "postcritical" would be displayed as the pattern of inquiry traced by this dialogue. I take the term (...)
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  33. Ecological Teachings in Sikh Theology.Devinder Pal Singh - 2021 - Academia Letters 1 (2653):1-6.
    In the present time, the ecological crisis is one of the gravest challenges being faced by humanity. There is a serious concern that our planet may fail to remain a sustainable biosystem in the long run. Though human beings are seen as the most intelligent life form on Earth, yet they are responsible for almost all the environmental damage done to the planet. Sikh theology emphasizes that recognizing the sacred relation between human beings and the environment is crucial for (...)
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  34.  99
    Braving the Challenges to Sikh Identity in the Present Era.Devinder Pal Singh - 2023 - The Sikh Bulletin, USA 25 (3):21-23.
    Sikh identity is a unique and distinct expression of faith and culture that has developed over centuries and reflects the experiences and values of the Sikh community. It is characterized by several distinguishing features, including a deep devotion to God, the practice of the five Ks (Kesh, Kangha, Kara, Kachera, and Kirpan), adherence to the teachings of the ten Sikh gurus as contained in the Guru Granth Sahib, and a commitment to principles of social justice, equality, and (...)
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  35. On the Interpretation of Scripture.Joshua Sijuwade - forthcoming - Perichoresis.
    This article focuses on examining a particular method of Biblical Interpretation. This specific method is that of the Patristic Method of Biblical Interpretation, proposed by Richard Swinburne. The Patristic Method faces a specific issue, ‘the Authority’ Issue, which will thus be dealt with within this article by utilising the notion of epistemic authority, as conceptualised by Linda Zagzebski, and restating it within a Catholic interpretative framework. Doing this will thus enable the Patristic Method to be presented as a robust and (...)
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  36. Taking scripture seriously: Leibniz and the jehoshaphat problem.Lloyd Strickland - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (1):40-51.
    Leibniz’s commitment to Christianity has been questioned for centuries; even today, some scholars claim that he was inclined towards deism or little more than a pagan metaphysician. Such an interpretation seems prima facie to be at odds with certain Christianized features of Leibniz's work, such as his decision to advance a solution to 'the Jehoshaphat problem', the problem of whether (or how) all the humans who have ever lived can simultaneously fit into the valley of Jehoshaphat. This problem has its (...)
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  37. Fighting for Sikh Causes in Indian Parliament - Book Review. [REVIEW]Devinder Pal Singh - 2022 - The Sikh Bulletin, USA 24 (1):43-44.
    “Fighting for Sikh Causes in Indian Parliament” is a compendium of speeches delivered by four Sikh Parliamentarians, i. e. Hukam Singh, Kapur Singh, Khuswant Singh and Tarlochan Singh. Each speech refers to a critical point in India’s post-1947 political history where the relationship between India, the Sikh community, and Punjab was under utmost stress and scrutiny. Prof. Hardev Singh Virk has done a yeoman's service to publish the speeches of these eminent Sikh parliamentarians who fought for (...)
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  38. Status of Women in Sikh Theology.Devinder Pal Singh - 2021 - The Sikh Bulletin 23 (1):34.
    Women represent half of all humanity, yet they continue to face discrimination in various parts of the world. The feminist movement has done much to lessen gender discrimination in western societies. However, women in much of the world still face severe difficulties, such as violence, illiteracy, economic and social deprivation. It is increasingly recognized that better education and economic empowerment of women can play a significant role in uplifting the economic level of impoverished areas of the world and lowering birth (...)
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  39. From Phenomenology to Scripture: A General Response.Peter Ochs - 2000 - Modern Theology 16 (3):341-345.
    This is a response to a Symposium on Phenomenology and Scripture. In examining a move from phenomenology to scripture, this symposium does not address all possible readers; it addresses a specific readership, for a specific reason, and within the framework of specific assumptions. By way of response, I want first to identify a few features of what I take to be the symposium’s specific address or context. Then, I will comment on what messages I believe the authors have (...)
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  40. A Leading Exponent of Sikh Gurus' Educational Philosophy-- Dr. Amrit Kaur Raina.Devinder Pal Singh - 2021 - The Sikh Review 69 (1):45-58.
    Dr. Amrit Kaur Raina, a renowned educationist, was a profound scholar of Sikhism. Having served as an educationist and administrator for over forty years at various prestigious educational institutions in India, she had also established herself as an eminent writer in the field of a comparative study of religions. Through her literary essays, as published in several reputed research journals, magazines, books, and newspapers, she had been able to create an indelible mark of scholarship on the minds of her readers. (...)
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  41. Scripture and Scepticism in Vasubandhu’s Exegetical Method.Oren Hanner - 2020 - In Buddhism and Scepticism: Historical, Philosophical, and Comparative Perspectives. Freiburg/Bochum: ProjektVerlag. pp. 131-160.
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  42. Human Rights -A Core Concern in Sikh Doctrines (Part I).Devinder Pal Singh - 2022 - The Sikh Review, Kolkata, WB, India 8 (70):29-39.
    Sri Guru Granth Sahib, through its comprehensive worldview, offers a perfect set of values and an applicable code of conduct. Its cardinal message is addressed to the welfare of all humans irrespective of their caste, color, creed, culture, and religion. SGGS emphasizes love, respect, empathy, and acceptance of others' existence. It prohibits us from infringing on the freedom and rights of others. The life and works of the Sikh Gurus exemplify the practicability of these ideas. Their inter-faith dialogues highlighted (...)
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  43. Bhai Vir Singh - A Harbinger of Sikh Renaissance and Father of Modern Punjabi Literature.Devinder Pal Singh - 2022 - Punjab Dey Rang, Lahore, Pakistan 16 (2):24-34.
    Bhai Vir Singh, a multifaceted personality, had made a seminal contribution to the Sikh religion, its heritage and Punjabi literature. He was one of the harbingers of the Sikh renaissance and immensely contributed to rejuvenating Sikh heritage, history, literature, education, culture and commerce. Bhai Vir Singh was born on December 5, 1872, at Amritsar. He was the eldest among his six siblings. His father, Dr. Charan Singh, was a medical practitioner and an illustrious scholar. His grandfather Bhai (...)
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  44. An Outstanding Administrator and A Dedicated Exponent of Sikh Doctrines.Devinder Pal Singh - 2021 - The Sikh Bulletin 23 (3):25-38.
    Dr. Karminder Singh Dhillon is a much-acclaimed administrator, a renowned theologian, a profound scholar of comparative religious studies, a prolific writer, and a Sikh thinker. During his 32 year long professional career in the Malaysian Civil Service, he has served the country in several important positions. Since 1985, as a devout Sikh, he has been involved in Kirtan, Katha, and Parchar activities. Besides his marvelous professional achievements, Dr. Karminder Singh has made remarkable contributions toward the authentic understanding of (...)
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  45.  97
    Elisabeth Meru – A Prolific Author and a Devoted Sikh Proponent.Devinder Pal Singh - 2023 - The Sikh Review, Kolkata, WB, India 71 (5):48-52.
    Elisabeth Meru, born in Hamburg, is a poetess by heart, a storyteller by nature, a forwarding merchant / financial accountant by training, and a Sikh by choice. She is currently settled in Munich, Germany. During the past three decades, she has authored numerous short stories, articles, and poetic compositions for various newspapers, journals, and radio broadcasts. With over a dozen books, both in English and German languages, to her credit to date, she is a prolific author who specializes in (...)
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  46.  79
    Theological Systematization and the Order Between the Literal and Allegorical Senses of Scripture.David Francis Sherwood - 2023 - The Aquinas Review of Thomas Aquinas College 26 (2):151-77.
    This paper demonstrates the inadequacy of the literalist and the allegorist approaches to Sacred Scripture, when isolated from each other, through the lenses of the Antiochian and Alexandrian Schools during the Patristic Era. Then, it turns to the perfection of the literal and allegorical approaches when brought together in proper order in the hands of the Saint Thomas Aquinas.
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  47. Air - A Classical Element of Life in Sikh Theology.Devinder Pal Singh - 2021 - Asia Samachar.
    Air is one of the five classical elements, which make all the creation. We can perceive air in the things it moves, be it leaves or hair. It is an invisible mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, and minute amounts of other gases surrounding the Earth. It is all around us. Yet, we cannot see it. Pure air has no odour. It has many uses. It provides a breath of life to all living beings. As, atmosphere, it prevents the excessive heat of (...)
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  48. Jeffrey S. Siker, Scripture and Ethics. Twentieth-Century Portraits. [REVIEW]Ludger Jansen - 1999 - Zeitschrift für Medi­Zi­Nische Ethik (45):85-87.
    This is a review of Siker's book, evaluating the use of scripture and biblical references by important authors in theological ethics.
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  49. Reparative reasoning: From Peirce's pragmatism to Augustine's scriptural semiotic.Peter Ochs - 2009 - Modern Theology 25 (2):187-215.
    This is a genealogical study that traces a “broadly Cartesian” pattern of argumentation: from Augustine’s scriptural semiotic to the “narrowly Cartesian” practice of foundationalism to Charles Peirce’s pragmatic and reparative semiotic. The essay argues (1) that Augustine transformed Stoic logic into a scriptural semiotic; (2) that this semiotic breeds both Cartesian foundationalism and the pragmatic semiotic that repairs it; (3) that Peirce’s semiotic displays the latter. In sum, Augustine’s inquiry risks foundationalism but also breeds a self-corrective “reparative reasoning.” This reasoning (...)
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  50. Hobbes on the Authority of Scripture.Thomas Holden - 2018 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 8:68-95.
    To understand Hobbes’s handling of Christian scripture in Part 3 of Leviathan we need to see it in the light of his own radical account of the norms controlling public religious speech and practice as set out in Part 2 and in other works such as De Cive and De Corpore. As these texts make clear, Hobbes holds that we ought rationally to venerate the first cause of all, and that the proper way to venerate this awesome and incomprehensible (...)
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