Aristotle: Time

Edited by Caleb Cohoe (Metropolitan State University of Denver, University of Colorado Denver)
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  1. added 2020-07-19
    Taking Time.Chelsea Harry - 2015 - In Chronos in Aristotle’s Physics. Dordrecht: Springer Verlag. pp. 51-67.
    Despite the language we saw in the previous chapter, which allowed for time apprehension by perception and marking, in Physics iv 14, Aristotle famously argues that time is dependent on nous.
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  2. added 2019-09-16
    Tiempo lógico y tiempo real.Indalecio García - 2012 - Ontology Studies: Cuadernos de Ontología:289-301.
    Aristotle describes time as continuous (cf. Phys. 219a 10-15). We argue here, first, that the time's continuity and magnitude's continuity differ, even though time's continuity depends on magnitude: actually a magnitude can be divided, that is, can fail to be continuous, but not time: time can be never actually divided, because an actual division in time would imply something like a real point in which time is denied, and that is impossible according to Aristotle (cf. Phys. 251b 10-28). The only (...)
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  3. added 2019-06-05
    Aristotle on Identity and Persistence.John Bowin - 2008 - Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 41 (1):63-88.
    In Physics 4.11, Aristotle discusses a sophistical puzzle in which "being Coriscus-in-the-Lyceum is different from being Coriscus-in-the-market-place." I take this puzzle to threaten the persistence of changing entities. Aristotle's answer to the puzzle is that the changing thing "is the same in respect of that, by (means of) being which at any time it is (what it is), S but in definition it is different." That is, Coriscus may be described as either a persisting substrate or as one or more (...)
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  4. added 2018-07-30
    Aristotle’s Physics: The Metaphysics of Change, Matter, Motion and Time.Philipp Blum - manuscript
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  5. added 2018-07-30
    How to Save Aristotle From Modal Collapse.Derek von Barandy - 2013 - Studia Neoaristotelica 10 (1):89-98.
    On Jaakko Hintikka’s understanding of Aristotle’s modal thought, Aristotle is committed to a version of the Principle of Plenitude, which is the thesis that no genuine possibility will go unactualized in an infinity of time. If in fact Aristotle endorses the Principle of Plenitude, everything becomes necessary. Despite the strong evidence that Aristotle indeed accepts that Principle of Plenitude, there are key texts in which Aristotle seems to contradict it. On Hintikka’s final word on the matter, Aristotle either endorses the (...)
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  6. added 2018-07-30
    Change in Aristotle's Physics 3.Andreas Anagnostopoulos - 2010 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 39:33-79.
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  7. added 2018-07-30
    Aristotle on the Unity of Change: Five Reductio Arguments in Physics Viii 8.John Bowin - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (2):319-345.
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  8. added 2018-07-30
    AN INTRODUCTION TO ARISTOTLE's METAPHYSICS OF TIME.Historical Research Into the Mythological and Astronomical Conceptions That Preceded Aristotle’s Philosophy.Régis Laurent (ed.) - 06/11/2015 - VILLEGAGNONS-PLAISANCE.
    This study of Greek time before Aristotle’s philosophy starts with a commentary on his first text, the Protrepticus. We shall see two distinct forms of time emerge: one initiatory, circular and Platonic in inspiration, the other its diametrical opposite, advanced by Aristotle. We shall explore this dichotomy through a return to poetic conceptions. The Tragedians will give us an initial outline of the notion of time in the Greek world (Fate); we shall then turn to Homer in order to better (...)
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  9. added 2018-05-01
    Why Continuous Motions Cannot Be Composed of Sub-Motions: Aristotle on Change, Rest, and Actual and Potential Middles.Caleb Cohoe - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (1):37-71.
    I examine the reasons Aristotle presents in Physics VIII 8 for denying a crucial assumption of Zeno’s dichotomy paradox: that every motion is composed of sub-motions. Aristotle claims that a unified motion is divisible into motions only in potentiality (δυνάμει). If it were actually divided at some point, the mobile would need to have arrived at and then have departed from this point, and that would require some interval of rest. Commentators have generally found Aristotle’s reasoning unconvincing. Against David Bostock (...)
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  10. added 2018-02-02
    Considerações do Conceito de Tempo na Leitura do Livro IV da Física de Aristóteles.Marcos Jaques - manuscript
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  11. added 2017-11-21
    The Now and the Relation Between Motion and Time in Aristotle: A Systematic Reconstruction.Mark Sentesy - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (3):279-323.
    This paper reconstructs the relationship between the now, motion, and number in Aristotle to clarify the nature of the now, and, thereby, the relationship between motion and time. Although it is clear that for Aristotle motion, and, more generally, change, are prior to time, the nature of this priority is not clear. But if time is the number of motion, then the priority of motion can be grasped by examining his theory of number. This paper aims to show that, just (...)
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  12. added 2016-03-21
    Divine and Mortal Motivation: On the Movement of Life in Aristotle and Heidegger.Jussi Backman - 2005 - Continental Philosophy Review 38 (3-4):241-261.
    The paper discusses Heidegger's early notion of the “movedness of life” (Lebensbewegtheit) and its intimate connection with Aristotle's concept of movement (kinēsis). Heidegger's aim in the period of Being and Time was to “overcome” the Greek ideal of being as ousia – constant and complete presence and availability – by showing that the background for all meaningful presence is Dasein, the ecstatically temporal context of human being. Life as the event of finitude is characterized by an essential lack and incompleteness, (...)
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  13. added 2015-08-26
    The Irony of Chance.Pascal Massie - 2003 - International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (1):15-28.
    The diversity of interpretations of Aristotle’s treatment of chance and luck springs from an apparent contradiction between the claims that “chance events are for the sake of something” and that “chance events are not for the sake of their outcome.” Chance seems to entail the denial of an end. Yet Aristotle systematically refers it to what is for the sake of an end. This paper suggests that, in order to give an account of chance, a reference to “per accidens causes” (...)
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  14. added 2014-10-18
    Ho Pote on Esti and Coupled Entities: A Form of Explanation in Aristotle's Natural Philosophy.Harvey Lederman - 2014 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 46:109-64.
    The difficult phrase ὅ ποτε ὄν ἐστι (hereafter ‘OPO’), which occurs in key passages in Aristotle’s discussions of blood and of time, has long vexed interpreters of Aristotle. This paper proposes a new interpretation of OPO, which resolves some textual and interpretative problems about Aristotle’s theories of blood and of time. My interpretation will also shed light on more general issues in Aristotle’s metaphysics. In the passages I will discuss, Aristotle takes both blood and time to be examples of his (...)
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  15. added 2014-07-04
    Tiempo y cambio. Física IV, 10-14.Diana Acevedo - 2010 - Dissertation, Pontifica Universidad Javeriana
    The problem of time has been present throughout history of philosophy since its beginnings. However to consider what is time is not a matter of technical theorization, conversely, this results interesting in as much as a reflection on the nature of world, and even the human particularities, cannot evade time problem. Aristotle is a stage under obligation in history of philosophy. My main purpose is to understand why time is problematic and what difficulties we have to meet with (chapter one). (...)
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  16. added 2014-03-26
    Aristotle as A-Theorist: Overcoming the Myth of Passage.Jacqueline Mariña & Franklin Mason - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):169-192.
    Debate about the nature of time has been dominated by discussion of two issues: the reality of absolute time and the reality of A-series. We argue that Aristotle adopts a form of the A-theory entailing a denial of the reality of absolute time. Furthermore, Aristotle's denial of absolute time is linked to a denial of the reality of pure temporal becoming, namely, the idea that the now moves through a fixed continuum along which events are arranged in chronological order. We (...)
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  17. added 2013-04-20
    Aristotle on the Order and Direction of Time.John Bowin - 2009 - Apeiron 42 (1):49-78.
    This paper defends Aristotle’s project of deriving the order of time from the order of change in Physics 4.11, against the objection that it contains a vicious circularity arising from the assumption that we cannot specify the direction of a change without invoking the temporal relations of its stages. It considers and rejects a solution to this objection proposed by Ursula Coope, and proposes an alternative solution. It also considers the related problem of how the temporal orders and directions derived (...)
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