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  1. The Emotional Dimension to Sensory Perception.Lana Kuhle - 2020 - In Berit Brogaard and Dimitria Electra Gatzia (ed.), The Epistemology of Non-Visual Perception. New York, NY, USA: pp. 236-255.
    Our emotional states affect how we perceive the world. If I am stressed, annoyed, or irritated, I might experience the sound of children laughing and screaming as they play around the house in a negative manner — it is unpleasant, loud, piercing, and so on. Yet, if I’m in a relaxed, happy, loving mood, the very same sounds might be experienced as pleasant, playful, warm, and so on. The sounds being made by the children are the same in both cases, (...)
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  2. Que reste-t-il de nos émotions passées ? La mémoire affective dans l'histoire de la psychologie scientifique.Héloïse Athéa & Marina Trakas - forthcoming - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger.
    Plaçant au centre de ses recherches la vie affective humaine, Théodule Ribot (1839-1916), qui participe au développement de la psychologie scientifique en France, est l’un des premiers à penser les rapports entre mémoire et émotions. Au sein de ce qu’il appelle la « mémoire affective », Ribot pense qu’il existe une mémoire spécifique des émotions. A l’intérieur de la communauté des psychologues scientifiques sa proposition a pour effet d’initier un débat à propos de l’existence, de la définition et du contenu (...)
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  3. When Silence May Mean Derision.Varol Akman - 1994 - Journal of Pragmatics 22 (2):211-212.
    In a paper published in 1992, Dennis Kurzon shows that silence does not necessarily mean lack of power: the silent response to a question may well be aiming at gaining control of a situation, viz. exercising power. I would like to extend Kurzon's analysis and argue that at times silence may mean derision or ridicule.
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  4. Representing Emotions in Terms of Object Directedness.Varol Akman & Hakime G. Unsal - 1994 - Department of Computer Engineering Technical Reports, Bilkent University.
    A logical formalization of emotions is considered to be tricky because they appear to have no strict types, reasons, and consequences. On the other hand, such a formalization is crucial for commonsense reasoning. Here, the so-called "object directedness" of emotions is studied by using Helen Nissenbaum's influential ideas.
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  5. HIDDEN FOUNDATIONS OF DISGUST: REEVALUATING THE EXISTENTIAL NATURE OF DISGUST.Tomas Sinkunas - 2017 - HORIZON. Studies in Phenomenology 6 (2):226-249.
    In spite of the many important findings made within the theory of emotions, scholars still struggle to coherently account for the unique structure of disgust or determine its essence. In contrast to much of the contemporary literature on disgust, I aim to show that, through employing the phenomenological method in his 1929 essay “Disgust” (Der Ekel), Aurel Kolnai was able to grasp the real significance of the phenomenon of disgust. The current study aims to clarify and present Kolnai’s insight into (...)
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  6. Foreknowledge & Divine Emotions.Tyler McNabb & Michael DeVito - 2022 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 14 (3):115-128.
    . In this essay, we move to further advance the work done on God and emotions by RT Mullins, exploring the role exhaustive divine foreknowledge plays as it relates to God’s emotional life. Given our preliminary investigation at the intersection of divine foreknowledge and divine emotions, and focusing specifically on the neoclassical theistic conception of God, we argue that in light of God’s foreknowledge, his emotional life is dissimilar when compared to that of his creation. That said, our primary aim (...)
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  7. Landing with the Firefly.Silvia Caprioglio Panizza - 2022 - Constructivist Foundations 17 (3).
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  8. Posidonius’ Two Systems: Animals and Emotions in Middle Stoicism.Benjamin Harriman - forthcoming - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie.
    This paper attempts to reconstruct the views of the Stoic Posidonius on the emotions, especially as presented by Galen’s On the Doctrines of Hippocrates and Plato. This is a well-studied area, and many views have been developed over the last few decades. It is also significant that the reliability of Galen’s account is openly at issue. Yet it is not clear that the interpretative possibilities have been fully demarcated. Here I develop Galen’s claim that Posidonius accepted a persistent, non-rational aspect (...)
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  9. Emotion in Plato's Trial of Socrates.Thomas W. Moody - 2022 - Dissertation, City University of New York
    My dissertation argues that Plato composed the figure of Socrates as a three- dimensional literary character who experiences and confronts emotions in ways that other studies have overlooked. By adopting a dramatic, non-dogmatic mode of reading the dialogues and emphasizing the literary elements of the texts and their dramatic connections, this dissertation offers a new and compelling portrait of Socrates in the dialogues that relate his finals weeks of life: Theaetetus, Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, and Phaedo. This study in turn provides (...)
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  10. Nietzsche on the Sociality of Emotional Experience.Kaitlyn Creasy - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  11. Introspection of Emotions.Bertille De Vlieger & Anna Giustina - 2022 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 103 (3):551-580.
    In this paper, we argue that knowledge of emotions essentially depends on introspecting the phenomenology of emotional experiences, and that introspection of emotional experiences is a process by stages, where the most fundamental stage is a non-classificatory introspective state, i.e., one that does not depend on the subject’s classifying the introspected emotion as an instance of any experience type. We call such a non-classificatory kind of introspection primitive introspection. Our main goal is to show that, although not sufficient, primitive introspection (...)
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  12. The Depths of Temporal Desynchronization in Grief.Emily Hughes - 2022 - Psychopathology 55.
    Introduction: The experience of disconnection is common in first-person accounts of grief. One way in which this feeling of estrangement can manifest is through the splintering apart of the time of the mourner and the time of the world. Supplementing and extending Thomas Fuchs' influential idea of temporal desynchronization, my aim in this article is to give an account of the heterogeneous ways in which grief can disturb time. -/- Method: I organize these manifold experiences of temporal disruption according to (...)
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  13. Moral Shock.Katie Stockdale - 2022 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 8 (3):496-511.
    This paper defends an account of moral shock as an emotional response to intensely bewildering events that are also of moral significance. This theory stands in contrast to the common view that shock is a form of intense surprise. On the standard model of surprise, surprise is an emotional response to events that violated one's expectations. But I show that we can be morally shocked by events that confirm our expectations. What makes an event shocking is not that it violated (...)
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  14. Emotional Environments: Selective Permeability, Political Affordances and Normative Settings.Matthew Crippen - forthcoming - Topoi:1-13.
    I begin this article with an increasingly accepted claim: that emotions lend differential weight to states of affairs, helping us conceptually carve the world and make rational decisions. I then develop a more controversial assertion: that environments have non-subjective emotional qualities, which organize behavior and help us make sense of the world. I defend this from ecological and related embodied standpoints that take properties to be interrelational outcomes. I also build on conceptions of experience as a cultural phenomenon, one that (...)
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  15. Thomas Aquinas on the Relation Between Cognition and Emotion.Bobier Christopher - 2022 - The Thomist 86 (2):219-243.
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  16. Modularity and the Politics of Emotion Categorisation.Raamy Majeed - 2022 - A Tribute to Ronald de Sousa.
    Empirically-informed approaches to emotion often construe our emotions as modules: systems hardwired into our brains by evolution and purpose-built to generate certain coordinated patterns of expressive, physiological, behavioural and phenomenological responses. In ‘Against Modularity’ (2008), de Sousa argues that we shouldn’t think of our emotions in terms of a limited number of modules because this conflicts with our aspirations for a life of greater emotional richness. My aim in this paper is to defend de Sousa’s critique of modular emotion taxonomies (...)
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  17. On Being Angry at Oneself.Laura Silva - 2022 - Ratio 35 (3):236-244.
    The phenomenon of self-anger has been overlooked in the contemporary literature on emotion. This is a failing we should seek to remedy. In this paper I provide the first ef-fort towards a philosophical characterization of self-anger. I argue that self-anger is a genuine instance of anger and that, as such, it is importantly distinct from the negative self-directed emotions of guilt and shame. Doing so will uncover a potentially distinctive role for self-anger in our moral psychology, as one of the (...)
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  18. Epistemic Feelings Are Affective Experiences.Slawa Loev - 2022 - Emotion Review 14 (3):206-216.
    Emotion Review, Volume 14, Issue 3, Page 206-216, July 2022. This paper develops the claim that epistemic feelings are affective experiences. To establish some diagnostic criteria, characteristic features of affective experiences are outlined: valence and arousal. Then, in order to pave the way for showing that epistemic feelings have said features, an initial challenge coming from introspection is addressed. Next, the paper turns to empirical findings showing that we can observe physiological and behavioural proxies for valence and arousal in epistemic (...)
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  19. Meanings of Pain, Volume 3: Vulnerable or Special Groups of People.Simon Van Rysewyk - 2022 - Springer.
    - First book to describe what pain means in vulnerable or special groups of people - Clinical applications described in each chapter - Provides insight into the nature of pain experience across the lifespan -/- This book, the third and final volume in the Meaning of Pain series, describes what pain means to people with pain in “vulnerable” groups, and how meaning changes pain – and them – over time. -/- Immediate pain warns of harm or injury to the person (...)
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  20. Ordinary Self‐Consciousness as Philosophical Problem.James Laing - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):709-724.
    European Journal of Philosophy, Volume 30, Issue 2, Page 709-724, June 2022.
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  21. The Reactive Theory of Emotions.Olivier Massin - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    Evaluative theories of emotions purport to shed light on the nature of emotions by appealing to values. Three kinds of evaluative theories of emotions dominate the recent literature: the judgment theory equates emotions with value judgments; the perceptual theory equates emotions with perceptions of values, and the attitudinal theory equates emotions with evaluative attitudes. This paper defends a fourth kind of evaluative theory of emotions, mostly neglected so far: the reactive theory. Reactive theories claim that emotions are attitudes which arise (...)
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  22. Recurrent Neural Network Based Speech Emotion Detection Using Deep Learning.P. Pavithra - 2022 - Journal of Science Technology and Research (JSTAR) 3 (1):65-77.
    In modern days, person-computer communication systems have gradually penetrated our lives. One of the crucial technologies in person-computer communication systems, Speech Emotion Recognition (SER) technology, permits machines to correctly recognize emotions and greater understand users' intent and human-computer interlinkage. The main objective of the SER is to improve the human-machine interface. It is also used to observe a person's psychological condition by lie detectors. Automatic Speech Emotion Recognition(SER) is vital in the person-computer interface, but SER has challenges for accurate recognition. (...)
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  23. The Intentionality of Emotions and the Possibility of Unconscious Emotions.Stéphane Lemaire - 2022 - J. Deonna, C. Tappolet and F. Teroni (Eds.), A Tribute to Ronald de Sousa. URL Https://Www.Unige.Ch/Cisa/Related-Sites/Ronald-de-Sousa/.
    Two features are often assumed about emotions: they are intentional states and they are experiences. However, there are important reasons to consider some affective responses that are not experienced or only partly experienced as emotions. But the existence of these affective responses does not sit well with the intentionality of conscious emotions which are somehow geared towards their object. We therefore face a trilemma: either these latter affective responses do not have intentional objects and we should renounce intentionality as a (...)
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  24. Dal Corpo Oggetto Alla Mente Incarnata - From the Object Body to the Embodied Mind.Francesca Brencio - 2021 - InCircolo – Rivista di Filosofia E Culture 11.
    F. Brencio (2021) [in Italian and English] (ed.), Dal corpo oggetto alla mente incarnata - From the object body to the embodied mind, in “InCircolo – Rivista di Filosofia e Culture”, 11, ISSN 2531-4092.
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  25. The Ineffable as Radical.Laura Silva - 2022 - In Christine Tappolet, Julien Deonna & Fabrice Teroni (eds.), A Tribute to Ronald de Sousa. Geneva:
    Ronald de Sousa is one of the few analytic philosophers to have explored the ineffability of emotion. Ineffability arises, for de Sousa, from attempts to translate experience, which involves non-conceptual content, into language, which involves conceptual content. As de Sousa himself rightly notes, such a characterization construes all perceptual experience as ineffable and does not explain what might set emotional ineffability apart. I build on de Sousa’s insights regarding what makes emotional ineffability distinctive by highlighting that in the case of (...)
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  26. Virtue, Happiness, and Emotion.Antti Kauppinen - forthcoming - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum.
    Philosophers have tried very hard to show that we must be virtuous to be happy. But as long as we stick to the modern understanding of happiness as something experienced by a subject – and I argue against contemporary eudaimonists that we should indeed do so – there can at best exist a contingent causal connection between virtue and happiness. Nevertheless, we have good reason to think that being virtuous is non-accidentally conducive to happiness. Why? First, happiness is roughly the (...)
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  27. Transparent Self-Knowledge of Attitudes and Emotions: A Davidsonian Attempt.Ning Fan - 2021 - International Philosophical Quarterly 61 (243):275-284.
    In Authority and Estrangement, Richard Moran provides a fascinating account of how we know what we believe that he calls the “transparency account.” This account relies on the transparency relation between the question of whether we believe that p and the question of whether p is true. That is, we can consider the former by considering the grounds for the latter. But Moran’s account has been criticized by David Finkelstein, who argues that it fails to explain how we know our (...)
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  28. Is the Digital Age Disrupting Our Emotional Feelings with Reference to Kazu Ishiguro's Novel "Klara and the Sun?".Dr Dalia Mabrouk - 2022 - World Journal of Advanced Research and Reviews 14 (1):15-30.
    In this paper, I'm questing the human insecurity and loneliness in a world struggling with a newfound understanding of mortality, change and technological intervention. I took Kazu Ishiguro's novel "Klara and the Sun" as it contains certain themes that depict not only the idea of struggling man in the new age, but also how the digital age is disrupting the human feelings. It reflects the patterns of the changing world while exploring the true meaning of love. Ishiguro has used a (...)
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  29. How Should We Feel About Recalcitrant Emotions?Krista Thomason - 2022 - In Andreas Brekke Carlsson (ed.), Self-Blame and Moral Responsibility.
    In everyday moral experience, we judge ourselves for our emotional responses. Most of the philosophical literature on recalcitrant emotions focuses on (a) whether and how they are possible or (b) whether and how they are irrational. My interest here is in the ways we blame ourselves for recalcitrant emotions. I aim to show that it is harder than it looks to explain self-blame for recalcitrant emotions. I argue recalcitrance alone does not give us a reason to feel any particular way (...)
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  30. On the Reason and Emotion in Interpersonal Treatment - A Thinking about the Moral Principles of Treating Non-rational People Reasonably.Xiaoming Yi & Dawei Zhang - 2017 - Qilu Journal 260 (5):56-63.
    Normal interpersonal treatment is often based on the existence of the rational nature of both the agent and the target of the treatment, and their relationship is reciprocal and mutual. However, when the rational person confronts the irrational person, such as the mentally retarded or vegetative person, the reciprocal relationship cannot be maintained because the targeted person loses his or her rational capacity. But this inequality does not deprive the object of action of the right to be treated rationally, because (...)
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  31. The “Puzzle” of Emotional Plasticity.Raamy Majeed - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (4):546-568.
    The “puzzle” of emotional plasticity concerns making sense of two conflicting bodies of evidence: evidence that emotions often appear modular in key respects, and evidence that our emotions also often appear to transcend this modularity. In this paper, I argue a developmentalist approach to emotion, which builds on Karmiloff-Smith’s (1986, 1992, 1994, 2015) work on cognitive development, can help us dissolve this puzzle.
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  32. Experimental Philosophy of Emotion.Rodrigo Díaz - forthcoming - In M. Bauer & S. Kornmesser (eds.), Compact Compendium of Experimental Philosophy. Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter.
    Are emotions bodily feelings or evaluative cognitions? What is happiness, pain, or “being moved”? Are there basic emotions? In this chapter, I review extant empirical work concerning these and related questions in the philosophy of emotion. This will include both (1) studies investigating people’s emotional experiences and (2) studies investigating people’s use of emotion concepts in hypothetical cases. Overall, this review will show the potential of using empirical research methods to inform philosophical questions regarding emotion.
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  33. Disability, Wellbeing, and (In)Apt Emotions.Dana Howard - 2018 - In Jessica Flanigan (ed.), The Ethics of Ability and Enhancement. New York, NY, USA: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 57-78.
    Many people view disabilities as misfortunes, call this the standard view. In this paper, I examine one criticism that has been launched against the Standard View. Rather than determine in advance whether having a disability is good or bad for a person, some critics argue that the Standard View is reflective of and brings about inappropriate emotional responses toward people with disabilities and their circumstances. For instance, philosophers have recently argued that in holding the standard view, we become prone to (...)
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  34. The Politics of Envy: Outlaw Emotions in Capitalist Societies.Alfred Archer, Alan Thomas & Bart Engelen - forthcoming - In Sara Protasi (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Envy. Rowman and Littlefield.
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  35. Making Sense of Shame in Response to Racism.Aness Kim Webster - 2021 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 51 (7):535-550.
    Some people of colour feel shame in response to racist incidents. This phenomenon seems puzzling since, plausibly, they have nothing to feel shame about. This puzzle arises because we assume that targets of racism feel shame about their race. However, I propose that when an individual is racialised as non-White in a racist incident, shame is sometimes prompted, not by a negative self-assessment of her race, but by her inability to choose when her stigmatised race is made salient. I argue (...)
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  36. Making Sense of Shame.James Laing - 2022 - Philosophy 97 (2):233-255.
    In this paper, I argue that we face a challenge in understanding the relationship between the ‘value-oriented’ and ‘other-oriented’ dimensions of shame. On the one hand, an emphasis on shame's value-oriented dimension leads naturally to ‘The Self-Evaluation View’, an account which faces a challenge in explaining shame's other-oriented dimension. This is liable to push us towards ‘The Social Evaluation View’. However The Social Evaluation View faces the opposite challenge of convincingly accommodating shame's ‘value-oriented’ dimension. After rejecting one attempt to chart (...)
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  37. Moral Experience: Perception or Emotion?James Hutton - 2022 - Ethics 132 (3):570-597.
    One solution to the problem of moral knowledge is to claim that we can acquire it a posteriori through moral experience. But what is a moral experience? When we examine the most compelling putative cases, we find features which, I argue, are best explained by the hypothesis that moral experiences are emotions. To preempt an objection, I argue that putative cases of emotionless moral experience can be explained away. Finally, I allay the worry that emotions are an unsuitable basis for (...)
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  38. What Roles Do Emotions Play in Morality?Antti Kauppinen - forthcoming - In Andrea Scarantino (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Emotion Theory. Routledge.
    This chapter offers an overview of four key debates about the roles of emotion in morality. First, many believe that emotions are an important psychological mechanism for explaining altruistic behavior and moral conscience in humans. Second, there is considerable debate about the causal role of affective reactions in moral judgment. Third, some philosophers have argued that emotions have a constitutive role in moral thought and even moral facts. Finally, philosophers disagree about whether affective influence undermines the justification of moral beliefs (...)
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  39. Remembering Emotions.Urim Retkoceri - 2022 - Biology and Philosophy 37 (5):1-26.
    Memories and emotions are both vital parts of everyday life, yet crucial interactions between the two have scarcely been explored. While there has been considerable research into how emotions can influence how well things are remembered, whether or not emotions themselves can be remembered is still a largely uncharted area of research. Philosophers and scientists alike have diverging views on this question, which seems to stem, at least in part, from different accounts of the nature of emotions. Here, I try (...)
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  40. Time as Relevance: Gendlin's Phenomenology of Radical Temporality.Joshua Soffer - manuscript
    In this paper, I discuss Eugene Gendlin’s contribution to radically temporal discourse , situating it in relation to Husserl and Heidegger’s analyses of time, and contrasting it with a range of interlinked approaches in philosophy and psychology that draw inspiration from, but fall short in their interpretation of the phenomenological work of Husserl and Heidegger. Gendlin reveals the shortcomings of these approaches with regard to the understanding of the relation between affect, motivation and intention, intersubjectivity, attention , reflective and pre-reflective (...)
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  41. Fear of the Past.Davide Bordini & Giuliano Torrengo - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    A widespread (and often tacit) assumption is that fear is an anticipatory emotion and, as such, inherently future-oriented. Prima facie, such an assumption is threatened by cases where we seem to be afraid of things in the past: if it is possible to fear the past, then fear entertains no special relation with the future—or so some have argued. This seems to force us to choose between an account of fear as an anticipatory emotion (supported by pre-theoretical intuitions as well (...)
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  42. MORAL EMOTIONS PHENOMENON WITH POSITIVE VALENCE AS A SOCIAL BEHAVIOR INCENTIVE.Tatyana Pavlova, Roman Pavlov & Valentyn Khmarskyi - 2021 - Epistemological studies in Philosophy, Social and Political Sciences 2 (4):26-36.
    The study aims at determining the role and significance of such moral emotions as nobility, gratitude, admiration for the socially significant behavior of a person in society. That involves identifying a close relationship between those emotions and personality’s social behavior and that they can be one of the main incentives for socially significant behavior – theoretical basis. The importance of ethical emotions with positive valence when making decisions with their implementation in society determines the research’s theoretical and methodological basis. Those (...)
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  43. Exemplification, Knowledge, and Education of the Emotions Through Conceptual Art.Elisa Caldarola - 2021 - Discipline Filosofiche (1).
    In this paper, with reference to Vito Acconci’s Following Piece (1969) and Sophie Calle’s Take care of yourself (2007), I show that some works of conceptual art rely on exemplification to convey ideas, and I defend the following claims about those works. In the first place, I argue that the kinds of events and of objects they present us with are relevant for appreciating the views the works convey. In the second place, siding with Elisabeth Schellekens (2007) and Peter Goldie (...)
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  44. Moral Emotions, Principles, and the Locus of Moral Perception.Joseph E. Corbi - 2006 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 2 (2006):61-80.
    I vindicate the thrust of the particularist position in moral deliberation. to this purpose, I focus on some elements that seem to play a crucial role in first-person moral deliberation and argue that they cannot be incorporated into a more sophisticated system of moral principles. More specifically, I emphasize some peculiarities of moral perception in the light of which I defend the irreducible deliberative relevance of a certain phenomenon, namely: the phenomenon of an agent morally coming across a particular situation. (...)
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  45. Dancing with Nine Colours: The Nine Emotional States of Indian Rasa Theory.Dyutiman Mukhopadhyay - manuscript
    This is a brief review of the Rasa theory of Indian aesthetics and the works I have done on the same. A major source of the Indian system of classification of emotional states comes from the ‘Natyasastra’, the ancient Indian treatise on the performing arts, which dates back to the 2nd Century AD (or much earlier, pg. LXXXVI: Natyasastra, Ghosh, 1951). The ‘Natyasastra’ speaks about ‘sentiments’ or ‘Rasas’ (pg.102: Natyasastra, Ghosh, 1951) which are produced when certain ‘dominant states’ (sthayi Bhava), (...)
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  46. The Responsive Diversity Worker.Amber Spence - 2021 - Canadian Journal of Practical Philosophy 7.
    Often in academia, women and minorities are held to a higher standard in how they present themselves (caring, empathetic) and how they manage the emotions of colleagues and students. The emotional labour that is expected of them is well documented. In this paper, I develop a new concept to address the emotional labour of diversity workers: Responsive Diversity Work. I summarize Carla Fehr’s view of the epistemic diversity worker, develop a theory of emotional labour, and explain how the responsive diversity (...)
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  47. Envy as a Civic Emotion.Sara Protasi - forthcoming - In Thom Brooks (ed.), Political Emotions: Towards a Decent Public Sphere. London: Palgrave Macmillan.
    In A Theory of Justice, John Rawls discusses “the problem of envy”, namely the worry that the well-ordered society could be destabilized by envy. Martha Nussbaum has proposed, in Political Emotions: Why Love Matters for Justice, that love, in particular what she calls civic friendship, is the solution to this problem. Nussbaum’s suggestion is in accordance with the long-standing notion that love and envy are incompatible opposites, and that the virtue of love is an antidote to the vice of envy. (...)
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  48. The Noetic Feeling of Confusion.Juliette Vazard & Catherine Audrin - 2021 - Philosophical Psychology 1 (14).
    Feeling confused can sometimes lead us to give up on the task, frustrated. What is less emphasized is that confusion may also promote happy (epistemic) endings to our inquiries. It has recently been argued that confusion motivates effortful investigative behaviors which can help us acquire hard-to-get epistemic goods (DiLeo et al., 2019; D’Mello & Graesser, 2012). While the motivational power of confusion and its benefits for learning has been uncovered in recent years, the exact nature of the phenomenon remains obscure. (...)
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  49. Beyond Ostension: Introducing the Expressive Principle of Relevance.Constant Bonard - 2022 - Journal of Pragmatics 187:13-23.
    In this paper, I am going to cast doubt on an idea that is shared, explicitly or implicitly, by most contemporary pragmatic theories: that the inferential interpretation procedure described by Grice, neo-Griceans, or post-Griceans applies only to the interpretation of ostensive stimuli. For this special issue, I will concentrate on the relevance theory (RT) version of this idea. I will proceed by putting forward a dilemma for RT and argue that the best way out of it is to accept that (...)
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  50. Emotion and Language in Philosophy.Constant Bonard - forthcoming - In Gesine Lenore Schiewer, Jeanette Altarriba & Bee Chin Ng (eds.), Emotion and Language. An International Handbook.
    In this chapter, we start by spelling out three important features that distinguish expressives—utterances that express emotions and other affects—from descriptives, including those that describe emotions (Section 1). Drawing on recent insights from the philosophy of emotion and value (2), we show how these three features derive from the nature of affects, concentrating on emotions (3). We then spell out how theories of non-natural meaning and communication in the philosophy of language allow claims that expressives inherit their meaning from specificities (...)
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