View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories
Subcategories:

388 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
1 — 50 / 388
Material to categorize
  1. Review: Johann Figl: Nietzsche Und Die Religionen. [REVIEW]Jing Huang - 2015 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 46:472-475.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Heidegger, Will to Power and Gestell.Joshua Soffer - manuscript
    For Heidegger Nietzsche is the last metaphysician because he determines truth in relation to the establishment of value-scheme. Heidegger argues that beginning from schematism and its overcoming is starting too late. Starting from beings as value-structures turns Will to Power itself into a value, the highest value. What Nietzsche fails to do is think from WITHIN, that is , AS the supposed self-presencing lingering of the schematism. The fore-structuring gesture of transcendence is not what goes beyond schematism, or before it (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Nietzsche Against Evan Thompson: The Will and Bliss.Joshua Soffer - manuscript
    How do such normative affectivities as 'unconditionally intrinsic goodness', 'spontaneous compassion', 'luminosity', 'blissfulness', ' a calm and peaceful life guided by the fundamental value of nonviolence' emerge as ultimate outcomes of a philosophy of groundlessness? Aren't they motivated by a sort of 'will to goodness', a preferencing of one affective dimension over others? It would seem that groundlessness for Evan Thompson doesn't apply to the thinking of affect and desire. Despite Varela's claim that nihilism cannot be overcome by assimilating groundlessness (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Choreography of the Soul: A Psychedelic Philosophy of Consciousness.Ed D'Angelo - manuscript
    This is a 2018 revision of my 1988 dissertation "The Choreography of the Soul" with a new Forward, a new Conclusion, a substantially revised Preface and Introduction, and many improvements to the body of the work. However, the thesis remains the same. A theory of consciousness and trance states--including psychedelic experience--is developed. Consciousness can be analyzed into two distinct but generally interrelated systems, which I call System X and System Y. System X is the emotional-visceral-kinaesthetic body. System X is a (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Must We Choose Between Real Nietzsche and Good Philosophy? A Streitschrift.Tom Stern - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):277.
    When I began writing about Nietzsche, working within an Anglophone philosophy department, I found little to read about the methods and goals of the practice I was engaging in. This was very surprising to colleagues in other disciplines, for whom “methods” classes were standard fare. Within my discipline, conversely, pretty much nobody asked questions about methodology. Increasingly, this has become, to my mind, one of the greatest challenges facing philosophical Nietzsche scholarship: to give an account of itself. My guess is (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Nietzsche and Plato on Unity and Disunity of the Soul.Mattia Riccardi - manuscript
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. The Nietzschean Self: Moral Psychology, Agency, and the Unconscious by Paul Katsafanas. [REVIEW]Richard Elliott - 2016 - Agonist - A Nietzsche Circle Journal 10:92 - 100.
    Review of The Nietzschean Self: Moral Psychology, Agency, and the Unconscious by Paul Katsafanas.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. ‘Plato and Nietzsche: Their Philosophical Art’, Mark Anderson. [REVIEW]Bethany Parsons - 2015 - Pli: The Warwick Journal of Philosophy 27:166-170.
    Book review of Mark Anderson's 'Plato and Nietzsche: Their Philosophical Art' for Pli, the Warwick Journal of Philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Many Healths: Nietzsche and Phenomenologies of Illness.Talia Welsh - 2016 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (11):338-357.
    This paper considers phenomenological descriptions of health in Gadamer, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Svenaeus. In these phenomenologies of health, health is understood as a tacit, background state that permits not only normal functioning but also philosophical reflection. Nietzsche’s model of health as a state of intensity that is intimately connected to illness and suffering is then offered as a rejoinder. Nietzsche’s model includes a more complex view of suffering and pain as integrally tied to health, and its language opens up the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Pragmatism, Perspectivism, Anthropology. A Consistent Triad.Pietro Gori - 2017 - Internationales Jahrbuch für Philosophische Anthropologie 7 (1):83-102.
    The paper defends the idea that Jamesian pragmatism, Nietzschean perspectivism, and philosophical anthropology represent a consistent triad, for the similarities and connections between the first two positions rest in their engagement with the anthropological question. As will be argued, a) pragmatism is concerned with anthropology and that it deals with a fundamental issue of Nietzsche’s late thought; b) the problem of the type of man (der Typus Mensch) is involved in Nietzsche’s questioning the value of truth, and perspectivism is an (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. Nietzsche and Murdoch on the Moral Significance of Perceptual Experience.Paul Katsafanas - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):525-545.
    : This paper examines a claim defended by an unlikely pair: Friedrich Nietzsche and Iris Murdoch. The claim is that perceptual experience itself—as distinct from perceptually based judgments and beliefs—can be morally significant. In particular, Nietzsche and Murdoch hold that two agents in the same circumstances attending to the same objects can have experiences with different contents, depending on the concepts that they possess and employ. Moreover, they maintain that this renders perception an object of moral concern. This paper explicates (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Instrumentalizacja naturalizmu w antropologicznej refleksji Nietzschego.Dawid Misztal - 2016 - Hybris. Revista de Filosofía 35:23-44.
    The paper presents anthropological issues as one of the main topics of Nietzsche’s philosophy. I begin with how Nietzsche defines the goals of his anthropological reflection and then I identify the perspective of naturalism as its central interpretational tool. Subsequently I try to show how it is instrumentalized in order to develop correct – according to Nietzsche – characteristics of human being, and as a mean of Nietzsche’s critique of metaphysics. In this way conceiving man as “homo natura” allows to (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Nietzsche and the Responsibility of Intellectuals.Paolo Stellino - 2017 - In Yulia V. Sineokaya and Ekaterina A. Poljakova (ed.), Friedrich Nietzsche: Legacy and Prospects. Moscow: LRC. pp. 467-477.
    Theories and ideas have consequences, like actions do. As a rule, we hold people responsible for their actions. In a similar way, we should reasonably hold intellectuals responsible for their theories and ideas. Among the aims of this paper is to consider whether the fact that Nietzsche’s thought was distorted and manipulated by Fascist and Nazi ideologues is a sufficient condition for releasing Nietzsche from all responsibility for the crimes that were partly justified through the appeal to his philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. El vientre de los modernos. Psicología, fisiologia y filologia de la consciencia historíca.Filippo Fimiani - 2017 - Boletín de Estética 39:7-42.
    “La ‘modernidad’ a través de la imagen de la comida y la digestión”. Ésta es la tarea y el programa de la genealogía fisiológica y psicológica identificada con claridad por Nietzsche en un fragmento del otoño de 1888 y firmemente perseguida en toda su obra. El diagnóstico es implacable y es posible por un uso extendido de la metáfora gastronómica, aplicada a todos los campos de la experiencia y el lenguaje por una escritura temeraria de la historia. Como Valéry y (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. A Nietzschean Critique of Metaphysical Philosophy. Mitchell - 2017 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 48 (3):347.
    This article provides a new account of Nietzsche’s critique of metaphysical philosophy. After framing Nietzsche’s anti-metaphysical project (Section 1), I suggest that to understand the logic of his critique we should reconstruct a taxonomy which distinguishes between ‘rich metaphysics’ and ‘thin metaphysics’ (Section 2). I then consider Nietzsche’s methodological critique of ‘rich metaphysics’, arguing that his position, which alleges motivational bias against ‘rich metaphysics’, is not compelling, since even granting that previous ‘rich metaphysicians’ exemplified such bias there is no necessity (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Virtuous Homunculi: Nietzsche on the Order of Drives.Mattia Riccardi - 2018 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 61 (1):21-41.
    The primary explanatory items of Nietzsche’s philosophical psychology are the drives. Such drives, he holds, are arranged hierarchically in virtue of their entering dominance-obedience relations analogous to those obtaining in human societies. This view is puzzling for two reasons. First, Nietzsche’s idea of a hierarchical order among the drives is far from clear. Second, as it postulates relations among subpersonal items that mimic those among persons, Nietzsche’s view seems to trade on the homunculus fallacy. In this paper, I argue that (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Friedrich Nietzsche's Flirt met Paradoxen en Chaos.Pouwel Slurink - 1992 - In Erik Heijerman & Winnie Wouters (eds.), Crisis van de rede. Perspectieven op cultuur. Assen, the Netherlands: van Gorcum. pp. 239-249.
    Lecture on Nietzsche's relativism and perspectivism given at a conference on the 'crisis of reason' in Amersfoort, the Netherlands, October 26, 1991. Nietzsche claims that truth does not exist and knowledge is not possible, because knowledge serves life and is bound to an organic position. In fact, this is a paradox that refutes itself. Knowledge has evolved precisely because organisms must have limited, perspectivistic knowledge of their environment from a subjective point of view. In science, subjectivity can even be transcended (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. « Un Argus aux cent yeux » : Connaissance de soi et généalogie dans Humain, trop humain.Paolo Stellino - 2017 - In C. Denat, P. Wotling (eds.), Humain, trop humain et les débuts de la réforme de la philosophie. Reims: Éditions et presses universitaires de Reims. pp. 415-433.
    It is commonplace among Nietzsche scholars to think that Nietzsche maintains a sceptical attitude towards the possibility of self-knowledge. This attitude, which is patent in the late works, could be traced back at least to the period of Human, All Too Human, if not to the unpublished essay On Truth and Lying in a Non-Moral Sense (1973). As much as this picture may be correct, it is incomplete. To see why this is so, one needs to distinguish between different notions (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. A caminho de uma filosofia sem alma. Uma abordagem psicofísica sobre a crítica da subjectividade de Nietzsche.Pietro Gori - 2017 - Cadernos Nietzsche 38 (2):13-35.
    Friedrich Nietzsche’s criticism towards the substance-concept “I” plays an important role in his thought, and can be properly understood by making reference to the 19th century debate on the scientific psychology. Friedrich Lange and Ernst Mach gave an important contribution to that debate. Both of them thought about a “psychology without soul”, that is, an investigation that gives up with the old metaphysics of substance in dealing with the mind-body problem. In this paper I shall deal with Lange’s and Mach’s (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Dasein’s Shadow and the Moment of its Disappearance.Rachel Aumiller - 2017 - Human Studies 40 (1):25-41.
    In his 1937 lectures, Heidegger searches for Nietzsche’s initial thought of “the Moment”. This paper mimics Heidegger’s pursuit of Nietzsche’s Moment by tracing Heidegger’s own early arrival at the Moment in Being and Time, published 10 years prior to his lectures on Nietzsche. Both Zarathustra and Dasein are chased in and out of an authentic relationship with the Moment by their own shadows, which disappear at midday. Dasein’s shadow is the being that is always closest-at-hand, the being in whom I (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Nietzsche. L'antiphilosophie I. 1992–1993 by Alain Badiou. [REVIEW]Philip Mills - 2017 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 48 (1):123-127.
    It is common knowledge that Nietzsche is very critical of traditional philosophy and strongly opposes a number of philosophers, but Alain Badiou goes beyond this claim to interpret and classify Nietzsche as an “antiphilosopher.” As such, Badiou’s interpretation belongs to the vast literature focusing on Nietzsche’s critique of metaphysics and truth. However, Badiou goes a bit further and develops a notion of “antiphilosophy” that not only is critical but also has a positive impact: Nietzsche is not only a critic of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Nietzsche on Woman.Lawrence J. Hatab - 1981 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 19 (3):333-345.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Nietzsche and the Paradox of Environmental Ethics: Nietzsche’s View of Nature and Morality.Martin Drenthen - 2002 - New Nietzsche Studies 5 (1/2):12-25.
    In this paper, I offer a systematic inquiry into the significance of Nietzsche’s philosophy to environmental ethics. Nietzsche’s philosophy of nature is, I believe, relevant today because it makes explicit a fundamental ambiguity that is also characteristic for our current understanding of nature. I will show how the current debate between traditional environmental ethics and postmodern environmental philosophy can be interpreted as a symptom of this ambiguity. I argue that, in light of Nietzsche’s critique of morality, environmental ethics is a (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Laughter in Nietzsche’s Thought: A Philosophical Tragicomedy.Lawrence J. Hatab - 1988 - International Studies in Philosophy 20 (2):67-79.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. The Drama of Agonistic Embodiment: Nietzschean Reflections on the Meaning of Sports.Lawrence J. Hatab - 1998 - International Studies in Philosophy 30 (3):97-107.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Nietzschean Self-Overcoming. Mitchell - 2016 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47 (3):323-350.
    Nietzsche often writes in praise of self-overcoming. He tells us that his humanity consists in “constant self-overcoming” 1 and that if someone wanted to give a name to his lifelong self-discipline against “Wagnerianism,” Schopenhauer, and “the whole modern ‘humaneness,’” then one might call it self-overcoming. He says that his writings “speak only” of his overcomings, later claiming that “the development of states that are increasingly high, rare, distant, tautly drawn and comprehensive … are dependent on the constant ‘self-overcoming of man’”,2 (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Nietzsche's Affective Perspectivism as a Philosophical Methodology.Mark Alfano - forthcoming - In Paul Loeb & Matthew Mayer (eds.), Nietzsche’s Metaphilosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Nietzsche’s perspectivism is a philosophical methodology for achieving various epistemic goods. Furthermore, perspectives as he conceives them relate primarily to agents’ motivational and evaluative sets. In order to shed light on this methodology, I approach it from two angles. First, I employ the digital humanities methodology pioneered recently in my recent and ongoing research to further elucidate the concept of perspectivism. Second, I explore some of the rhetorical tropes that Nietzsche uses to reorient his audience’s perspective. These include engaging the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. ‘An Uncanny Re-Awakening’: Nietzsche’s Renascence of the Renaissance Out of the Spirit of Jacob Burckhardt.Martin A. Ruehl - 2008 - In Manuel Dries (ed.), Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Metaphysical and Historical Claims in The Birth of Tragedy.Katherine Harloe - 2008 - In Manuel Dries (ed.), Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Nietzsche’s Problem of the Past.John Richardson - 2008 - In Manuel Dries (ed.), Nietzsche on Time and History. Walter de Gruyter.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31. “Some Third Thing”: Nietzsche's Words and the Principle of Charity. Stern - 2016 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47 (2):287-302.
    Nietzsche imagines Beethoven coming back to life and hearing a performance of one of his works in the very different style of the later nineteenth century: “‘That is neither I nor not-I but some third thing,’” says Nietzsche’s Beethoven, after a long pause, “‘—and it seems right in a way [etwas Rechtes], even if it is not exactly right [das Rechte]. But you had better take care what you’re doing, for you are the ones who have to listen to it—and (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Nietzsche on Psychology, Creativity and History.Stefan Schindler - manuscript
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Il pragmatismo di Nietzsche. Saggi sul pensiero prospettivistico.Pietro Gori - 2016 - Mimesis.
    Il pensiero prospettivistico del Nietzsche maturo sorge come reazione alla «fede in un valore metafisico e in sé della verità» che, a partire da Platone, ha animato la cultura occidentale. Agli occhi di Nietzsche, tale fede si trova all’origine del processo di degenerazione antropologica che ha caratterizzato la morale europea, ed è pertanto su di essa che occorre operare criticamente se si vuole avviare un contromovimento in grado di permettere all’umanità di orientarsi nei meandri labirintici del nichilismo. Attraverso una contestualizzazione (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Naturalism, Minimalism, and the Scope of Nietzsche's Philosophical Psychology.Paul Katsafanas - 2016 - In Kristin Gjesdal (ed.), Debates in Nineteenth-Century European Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 326-338.
    Bernard Williams’ “Nietzsche’s Minimalist Moral Psychology”, replete with provocative and insightful claims, has been extremely influential in Nietzsche scholarship. In the two decades since its publication, much of the most interesting and philosophically sophisticated work on Nietzsche has focused on exactly the topics that Williams addresses: Nietzsche’s moral psychology, his account of action, his naturalistic commitments, and the way in which these topics interact with his critique of traditional morality. While Williams’ pronouncements on these topics are brief and at times (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Introduction to Nietzsche on Mind and Nature.Manuel Dries & P. J. E. Kail - 2015 - In Nietzsche on Mind and Nature. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter provides summaries of the chapter of this book and introduces the major themes and debates addressed in the volume. Discussed are Nietzsche’s metaphysics; his philosophy of mind in light of contemporary views; the question of panpsychism of Beyond Good and Evil 36; the rejection of dualism in favour of monism, in particular a monism of value; Nietzsche’s positions on consciousness and embodied cognition in light of recent cognitive science; a conception of freedom and agency based on an intrinsically (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Zur Philosophie der Orientierung.Andrea Bertino, Ekaterina Poljakova, Andreas Rupschus & Benjamin Alberts (eds.) - 2016 - Walter de Gruyter.
    Orientierung steht am Anfang von allem, ohne selbst ein greifbarer Anfang zu sein. Als Letzt- und Grundbegriff geht sie jedem Denken und jeder Lebenstätigkeit voraus und ermöglicht sie. Dennoch war sie selbst bislang kaum Gegenstand philosophischer Reflexion. In seiner Philosophie der Orientierung macht Werner Stegmaier – bekannt durch seine Beiträge zu Nietzsche, Dilthey, Luhmann und Levinas – sie zum Ausgangspunkt, um die Philosophie selbst im Hinblick auf ihr praktisches, lebensweltliches Potential hin neu zu denken. Das breite Spektrum des Sich-Orientierens und (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Nihilism, Nietzsche and the Doppelganger Problem.Charles R. Pigden - 2007 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (5):441-456.
    Nihilism, Nietzsche and the Doppelganger Problem Was Nietzsche a nihilist? Yes, because, like J. L. Mackie, he was an error-theorist about morality, including the elitist morality to which he himself subscribed. But he was variously a diagnostician, an opponent and a survivor of certain other kinds of nihilism. Schacht argues that Nietzsche cannot have been an error theorist, since meta-ethical nihilism is inconsistent with the moral commitment that Nietzsche displayed. Schacht’s exegetical argument parallels the substantive argument (advocated in recent years (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  38. Contingency and Necessity in the Genealogy of Morality.Paul di Georgio - 2013 - Télos 2013 (162):97-111.
    Excerpt: In this essay I explore the nature of the necessity of historical development in Nietzsche’s genealogy of Judeo-Christian moral values. I argue that the progression of moral stages in Nietzsche’s study is ordered in such a way that the failure of each stage is logically and structurally necessary, that each failure structures the resultant system or paradigm, but that the historical manifestation of moral paradigms coinciding with predicted or projected theoretical structures is contingent upon a multitude of other historical (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Nachweis aus Plutarch, Ueber die gemeinen Begriffe. Wider die Stoiker.Robin Pompey - 2015 - Nietzsche-Studien 44 (1).
    Name der Zeitschrift: Nietzsche-Studien Jahrgang: 44 Heft: 1 Seiten: 488-489.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. Nietzsche’s Science of Love.Frank Chouraqui - 2015 - Nietzsche-Studien 44 (1):267-290.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Nietzsche-Studien Jahrgang: 44 Heft: 1 Seiten: 267-290 In this paper, I examine the possibility of constructing an ontological phenomenology of love by tracing Nietzsche’s questioning about science. I examine how the evolution of Nietzsche’s thinking about science and his increasing suspicion towards it coincide with his interest for the question of love. Although the texts from the early and middle period praise science as an antidote to asceticism, the later texts associate the scientifi c spirit with asceticism. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Nietzsche's Answer to the Naturalistic Fallacy: Life as Condition, Not Criterion, of Morality.Donovan Miyasaki - manuscript
    Nietzsche’s late writings present a value opposition of health and decadence based in his conception of organic life. While this appears to be a moral ideal that risks the naturalistic fallacy of directly deriving norms from facts, it instead describes a meta-ethical ideal: the necessary conditions for any kind of moral agency. Nietzsche’s ideal of health not only evades but also dissolves the naturalistic fallacy by suggesting that the specific content of morality is irrelevant. If health is measured by power (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Review Ken Gemes and John Richardson, Eds.,The Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2013. 783 Pp. ISBN 978-0-19-953464-7. Cloth, $140. [REVIEW]Jonathan Mitchell - 2015 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 46 (2):270-275.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Towards a Genealogy of the Gay Science: From Toulouse and Barcelona to Nietzsche and Beyond.Rolando Pérez - 2014 - eHumanista/IVITRA 5:546-703.
    This monograph traces the history of the concept of Gay Science, made popular by Friedrich Nietzsche through his book The Gay Science. Contrary to Nietzsche’s mistaken notion of the concept, it did not refer to a Troubadour poetics, but rather to a post-Troubadour poetics of recuperation—the complete opposite of what Nietzsche had thought. This poetry was not sung to young maidens, but instead to the Virgin Mary. The poetics of the Gay Science is found in an eight hundred page compendium (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Nietzsche’s Other Naturalism.Frank Chouraqui - 2014 - Pli: The Warwick Journal of Philosophy 25:155-178.
    This article presents a critique of the current naturalist readings of Nietzsche by drawing a distinction between a sense of naturalism based on nature taken as "what there is" and one based on the scientific concept of nature. The paper suggests that Nietzsche is a naturalist in the first sense, but not in the latter, and that due to the confusion between the two sense, many arguments in favor of the first have been unwarrantedly transferred into the latter. The article (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. On Homuncular Drives and the Structure of the Nietzschean Self.Paul Katsafanas - 2014 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (1):1-11.
    If Clark and Dudrick have their way, gone will be the days of breezy writings on Nietzsche that recruit a phrase from here, a paragraph from there, and construct an interpretation from the resultant mélange. Clark and Dudrick advocate a meticulous, line-by-line study of Nietzsche’s text, with painstaking attention not only to the broader context of his claims, but even to the precise intent of the images and metaphors that he employs. Here, we find a level of textual scrutiny and (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Czy Nietzsche mógł mieć rację?Marcin Miłkowski - 2003 - Przegląd Filozoficzno-Literacki 1 (1):213-235.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Ought We to Forget What We Cannot Forget? A Reply to Sybille Schmidt.Attila Tanyi - 2015 - In Giovanni Galizia & David Shulman (eds.), Forgetting: An Interdisciplinary Conversation. Magnes Press of the Hebrew University. pp. 258-262.
    This is a short response to Sybille Schmidt's paper (in the same volume) "Is There an Ethics of Forgetting?". The response starts out by admitting that forgetting is an essential function of human existence, that it serves, as it were, an important evolutionary function: that it is good, since it contributes to our well-being, to have the ability to forget. But this does not give us as answer, affirmative or not, to Schmidt’s title question: “Is There an Ethics of Forgetting?” (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48. Julian Young, Nietzsche's Philosophy of Religion Reviewed By.Meade McCloughan - 2008 - Philosophy in Review 28 (1):76-78.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. The Significance of Dance in Nietzsche's Thought.John E. Atwell - 1984 - In Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (ed.), Illuminating Dance: Philosophical Explorations. pp. 19--34.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. La Teoria Della Conoscenza di Mach E Nietzsche.Pietro Gori - 2011 - Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 7 (2):352-382.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 388