View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories
Siblings:

56 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
1 — 50 / 56
  1. Greek Philosophical Background of the New Testament.Lascelles G. B. James - manuscript
    This brief, reflective research looks analytically at the impact of Greek philosophy on Christianity from three perspectives. They are: 1) the challenge that it presented to Christianity, 2) the signs of syncretism, and 3) Christian differentiation despite assimilation of aspects of Greek philosophy. Though not exhaustive because of its brevity, the study may help with discussions on the backgrounds of Christianity, and also stimulate an interest in the religion, politics, and history of the Levant in the first century.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Letter to Aristotle.James Bardis - forthcoming - In Conference Proceedings of IICAHHawaii2017.
    …A reconstructed imaginal account of Alexander’s (the Great) historical letter to Aristotle pursuant to his (in-) famous meeting with the gymnosophist Dandimus on the paradoxes of Zeno ( presaging those of Nagarjuna ) as a means of presenting a synthesis of the stasis and dynamism implicit in the potential of a phenomenally real world beyond a rigid designation of a chain-of-being taxonomy where animal dignity resides side by side with predator-prey relations and a mind-laden ( theory ) of evolution.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Rational Impressions and the Stoic Philosophy of Mind.Vanessa de Harven - forthcoming - In John Sisko (ed.), History of Philosophy of Mind: Pre-Socratics to Augustine. Acumen Publishing.
    This paper seeks to elucidate the distinctive nature of the rational impression on its own terms, asking precisely what it means for the Stoics to define logikē phantasia as an impression whose content is expressible in language. I argue first that impression, generically, is direct and reflexive awareness of the world, the way animals get information about their surroundings. Then, that the rational impression, specifically, is inherently conceptual, inferential, and linguistic, i.e. thick with propositional content, the way humans receive incoming (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4. Philosophical Problems in Sense Perception: Testing the Limits of Aristotelianism.David Bennett & Juhana Toivanen - 2020 - Cham: Springer.
    This volume focuses on philosophical problems concerning sense perception in the history of philosophy. It consists of thirteen essays that analyse the philosophical tradition originating in Aristotle’s writings. Each essay tackles a particular problem that tests the limits of Aristotle’s theory of perception and develops it in new directions. The problems discussed range from simultaneous perception to causality in perception, from the representational nature of sense-objects to the role of conscious attention, and from the physical/mental divide to perception as quasi-rational (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Love, Will, and the Intellectual Ascents.Sarah Catherine Byers - 2020 - In Tarmo Toom (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Augustine's Confessions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 154-174.
    Augustine’s accounts of his so-called mystical experiences in conf. 7.10.16, 17.23, and 9.10.24 are puzzling. The primary problem is that, although in all three accounts he claims to have seen “that which is,” we have no satisfactory account of what “that which is” is supposed to be. I shall be arguing that, contrary to a common interpretation, Augustine’s intellectual “seeing” of “being” in Books 7 and 9 was not a vision of the Christian God as a whole, nor of one (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. The Concept of Pneuma After Aristotle.Sean Michael Pead Coughlin, David Leith & Orly Lewis (eds.) - 2020 - Berlin: Edition Topoi.
    This volume explores the versatility of the concept of pneuma in philosophical and medical theories in the wake of Aristotle’s physics. It offers fourteen separate studies of how the concept of pneuma was used in a range of physical, physiological, psychological, cosmological and ethical inquiries. The focus is on individual thinkers or traditions and the specific questions they sought to address, including early Peripatetic sources, the Stoics, the major Hellenistic medical traditions, Galen, as well as Proclus in Late Antiquity and (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Pneuma and the Pneumatist School of Medicine.Sean Michael Pead Coughlin & Orly Lewis - 2020 - In Sean Michael Pead Coughlin, David Leith & Orly Lewis (eds.), The Concept of Pneuma after Aristotle. Berlin: pp. 203-236.
    The Pneumatist school of medicine has the distinction of being the only medical school in antiquity named for a belief in a part of a human being. Unlike the Herophileans or the Asclepiadeans, their name does not pick out the founder of the school. Unlike the Dogmatists, Empiricists, or Methodists, their name does not pick out a specific approach to medicine. Instead, the name picks out a belief: the fact that pneuma is of paramount importance, both for explaining health and (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Meteorology.Monte Johnson - 2020 - In Liba Taub (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek and Roman Science. Cambridge, UK: pp. 160-184.
    Greco-Roman meteorology will be described in four overlapping developments. In the archaic period, astro-meteorological calendars were written down, and one appears in Hesiod’s Works and Days; such calendars or almanacs originated thousands of years earlier in Mesopotamia. In the second development, also in the archaic period, the pioneers of prose writing began writing speculative naturalistic explanations of meteorological phenomena: Anaximander, followed by Heraclitus, Anaxagoras, and others. When Aristotle in the fourth century BCE mentions the ‘inquiry that all our predecessors have (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Sextus on Ataraxia Revisited.Diego E. Machuca - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (2):435-452.
    My purpose in this article is to revisit an issue concerning the state of undisturbedness or tranquility (ἀταραξία) in ancient Pyrrhonism as this skeptical stance is depicted in Sextus Empiricus’s extant works. The issue in question is whether both the pursuit and the attainment of undisturbedness in matters of opinion should be regarded as defining features of Pyrrhonism not merely from a systematic standpoint that examines Pyrrhonism as a kind of philosophy, but mainly according to Sextus’s own account of that (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Athenaeus of Attalia on the Psychological Causes of Bodily Health.Sean Michael Pead Coughlin - 2018 - In Chiara Thumiger & P. N. Singer (eds.), Mental Illness in Ancient Medicine: From Celsus to Paul of Aegina. Leiden: Brill. pp. 107-142.
    Athenaeus of Attalia distinguishes two types of exercise or training (γυμνασία) that are required at each stage of life: training of the body and training of the soul. He says that training of the body includes activities like physical exercises, eating, drinking, bathing and sleep. Training of the soul, on the other hand, consists of thinking, education, and emotional regulation (in other words, 'philosophy'). The notion of 'training of the soul' and the contrast between 'bodily' and 'psychic' exercise is common (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11. Hellenistic Pythagorean Epistemology.Phillip Sidney Horky & Giulia De Cesaris - 2018 - Lexicon Philosophicum 6 (Special Issue: 'Hellenistic Theo):221-262.
    The paper offers a running commentary on ps-Archytas’ On Intellect and Sense Perception (composed ca. 80 BCE), with the aim to provide a clear description of Hellenistic/post-Hellenistic Pythagorean epistemology. Through an analysis of the process of knowledge and of the faculties that this involves, ps-Archytas presents an original epistemological theory which, although grounded in Aristotelian and Platonic theories, results in a peculiar Pythagorean criteriology that accounts for the acquisition and production of knowledge, as well as for the specific competences of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Las respuestas académicas a la objeción de apraxia.Christian F. Pineda-Pérez - 2018 - Praxis Filosófica 46:221-42.
    En este artículo reconstruyo y analizo las respuestas de los escépticos académicos a la objeción de apraxia. Esta objeción afirma que el escepticismo es una doctrina imposible de practicar puesto que sus tesis conducen a la apraxia, esta es, un estado de privación o imposibilidad de acción. Las respuestas a la objeción se dividen en dos clases. La primera prueba que el asentimiento no es una condición necesaria para realizar acciones, por lo que la recomendación escéptica de suspender global y (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. El aristotelismo en los primeros autores cristianos griegos.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2018 - In Pablo de Paz Amérigo & Ignacio Sanz Extremeño (eds.), Eulogía. Estudios sobre cristianismo primitivo. Homenaje a Mercedes López Salvá. Madrid: Escolar y Mayo. pp. 541-565.
    The author tries to expose the reception of Aristotelian philosophy among the first Greek Churchfathers, from St. Justin to the 'Refutatio'. There are some interesting points concerning the doxographical tradition, specially relating to the Aristotelian idea of God.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Sinoplu Filozof Diogenes (Diyojen) ve Etik Anlayışı.Alper Bilgehan Yardımcı - 2018 - Berikan Yayınevi.
    Diogenes of Sinope, bilinen adıyla Diogenes ya da Sinoplu Diyojen’e yönelik yapılan bu çalışmada amacım, Dioegenes’in yaşamının, felsefi duruşunun ve benimsediği etik kuralların kapsamlı ve belgelenmiş bir şekilde sunulmasıdır. Diogenes’in hayatını ve öğretilerini güvenilir bir şekilde aktarmak aşırı derecede zordur, çünkü diğer antik filozoflardan ayrı olarak, onun yaşamına ilişkin güvenilir kaynaklar bulmak oldukça sınırlıdır. Ayrıca, fıçının içinde yaşayan bir Kinikli’ye yönelik ortaya konulmuş birçok kurmaca anekdot ile uğraşılması gerekmektedir. Güvenilir bilginin azlığı ve belgesiz atıfların yarattığı zorluklara rağmen, yine de birçok (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Early Christian Ethics.Sarah Catherine Byers - 2017 - In Sacha Golob & Jens Timmermann (eds.), The Cambridge History of Moral Philosophy. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 112-124.
    G.E.M. Anscombe famously claimed that ‘the Hebrew-Christian ethic’ differs from consequentialist theories in its ability to ground the claim that killing the innocent is intrinsically wrong. According to Anscombe, this is owing to its legal character, rooted in the divine decrees of the Torah. Divine decrees confer a particular moral sense of ‘ought’ by which this and other act-types can be ‘wrong’ regardless of their consequences, she maintained. There is, of course, a potentially devastating counter-example. Within the Torah, Abraham is (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. “Vertendo vel etiam commentando in Latinam redigam formam” (In Aristotelis peri hermeneias commentarium. Editio secunda, II, 79.23 - 80.1). Boèce ou l’art de bien traduire (en commentant) et de bien commenter (en traduisant).Leone Gazziero - 2017 - Rursus 10:1-117.
    Celebrated as the equal to the great philosophers of old, namely Plato and Aristotle, whom – as Cassiodorus put it – he taught to speak Latin better than they spoke Greek, Boethius aspired to fully emancipate Roman culture from its Greek models through translations and exegesis so faithful they would leave nothing more to be desired from the original. The essay focuses on Boethius philhellenism, without complexes insofar as it had little to do either with the mixed feelings of his (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. The Spectrum of Animal Rationality in Plutarch.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2017 - Apeiron 50 (1):103-133.
    Thanks to the work of Stephen Newmyer, Plutarch’s importance for modern philosophical debates concerning animal rationality and rights has been brought to the forefront. But Newmyer’s important scholarship overlooks Plutarch’s commitment to a range of rational functions that can be ascribed to animals of various sorts throughout the Moralia. Through an application of the ‘spectrum of animal rationality’ described in the treatise On Moral Virtue to the dialogues where his interlocutors explore the rational capacities of non-human animals (especially Whether Land (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. An Apophatic Response to the Evidential Argument From Evil.Brown Joshua Matthan - 2017 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 78 (4-5):485-497.
    I argue that Christian apophaticism provides the most powerful and economical response to the evidential argument from evil for the non-existence of God. I also reply to the objection that Christian apophaticism is incoherent, because it appears to entail the truth of the following contradiction: it is both possible and impossible to know God’s essential properties. To meet this objection, I outline a coherent account of the divine attributes inspired by the theology of the Greek Father’s and St. Gregory Palamas.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Augustine's Debt to Stoicism in the Confessions.Sarah Catherine Byers - 2016 - In John Sellars (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition. Routledge. pp. 56-69.
    Seneca asserts in Letter 121 that we mature by exercising self-care as we pass through successive psychosomatic “constitutions.” These are babyhood (infantia), childhood (pueritia), adolescence (adulescentia), and young adulthood (iuventus). The self-care described by Seneca is 'self-affiliation' (oikeiōsis, conciliatio) the linchpin of the Stoic ethical system, which defines living well as living in harmony with nature, posits that altruism develops from self-interest, and allows that pleasure and pain are indicators of well-being while denying that happiness consists in pleasure and that (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Kant’s Moderate Cynicism and the Harmony Between Virtue and Worldly Happiness.David Forman - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (1):75-109.
    For Kant, any authentic moral demands are wholly distinct from the demands of prudence. This has led critics to complain that Kantian moral demands are incompatible with our human nature as happiness-seekers. Kant’s defenders have pointed out, correctly, that Kant can and does assert that it is permissible, at least in principle, to pursue our own happiness. But this response does not eliminate the worry that a life organized around the pursuit of virtue might turn out to be one from (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21. Philoponus on the Priority of Substances.Riin Sirkel - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (3):351-372.
    One of the issues that deeply interested the philosophers of late antiquity, the Ancient Greek Commentators, concerns the priority of substances. While questions concerning ontological priority have recently attracted attention in Aristotelian scholarship and contemporary metaphysics, the Commentators’ discussions have not yet received the attention they deserve. My aim is to start to fill in this gap, by focusing on John Philoponus’s account of the priority of substances in his commentary on Aristotle’s "Categories". In particular, I aim to show how (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. El conocimiento natural de Dios según san Pablo.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2016 - In Mercedes López Salvá, Ignacio Sanz Extremeño & Pablo de Paz Amérigo (eds.), Los orígenes del cristianismo en la filosofía, la literatura y el arte I. Madrid: Dykinson. pp. 157-200.
    This article studies the issue of natural knowledge of God in the Bible verses which speak most explicitly about it: Romans 1,18-32. 'Natural knowledge' means here knowledge accessible to all men by virtue of their innate forces, possible even for those who have not partaken in the biblical revelalion. St. Paul's passage is compared with Wisdom 13-15, which shares many doctrinal points with it. The Pauline discourse, though inserted into a theological reasoning within the perspective of faith, represents a truly (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Therapeutic Arguments, Spiritual Exercises, or the Care of the Self. Martha Nussbaum, Pierre Hadot and Michel Foucault on Ancient Philosophy.Konrad Banicki - 2015 - Ethical Perspectives 22 (4):601-634.
    The practical aspect of ancient philosophy has been recently made a focus of renewed metaphilosophical investigation. After a brief presentation of three accounts of this kind developed by Martha Nussbaum, Pierre Hadot, and Michel Foucault, the model of the therapeutic argument developed by Nussbaum is called into question from the perspectives offered by her French colleagues, who emphasize spiritual exercise (Hadot) or the care of the self (Foucault). The ways in which the account of Nussbaum can be defended are then (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24. Abraham Malherbe se bydrae tot Hellenistiese filosofie en die vroeë Christendom.Johan C. Thom - 2015 - Hts Theological Studies 71 (1).
    Abraham J. Malherbe was one of the most influential New Testament scholars of the past half century. He is especially known for his use of Hellenistic moral philosophy in the interpretation of New Testament texts, especially Pauline literature. Whilst the comparative study of New Testament and Greco-Roman material remains a contentious approach in scholarship, Malherbe’s work provides important pointers in how to make such comparisons in a meaningful and reasoned manner, by paying due respect to the integrity of the texts (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Mucius Scaevola and the Essence of Manly Patientia.Jula Wildberger - 2015 - Antiquorum Philosophia 9:27-39.
    Patientia, the virtue of enduring physiological pain, poses a problem for Roman elite masculinities. The male body is supposed to be unpenetrated, but when pain is inflicted the body is often cut and pierced. This paper looks at literary and philosophical representations of the moral exemplar Mucius Scaevola to see how Roman writers and philosophers deal with this dilemma.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Senecan Progressor Friendship and the Characterization of Nero in Tacitus' Annals.Jula Wildberger - 2015 - In Christoph Kugelmeier (ed.), Translatio humanitatis: Festschrift zum 60. Geburtstag von Peter Riemer. Sankt Ingbert: Röhrig Universitätsverlag. pp. 471-492.
    Argues that Tacitus’ shaped his account of Seneca and the characterization of Nero within his social environment according to features characteristic of Seneca’s conception of friendship. Surprisingly, Tacitus assigns to Nero an active power: The emperor drives a ubiquitous inversion of the social values promoted by his mentor. Patterns of Seneca’s social thought are adduced to characterize not only the portrayed emperor but also the political institution itself.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Du chien au philosophe : L'analogie du chien chez Diogène et Platon.Maria Hotes - 2014 - Revue de Philosophie Ancienne 32 (1):03-33.
    In this article, the author examines how Diogenes of Sinope and Plato employed the analogy of the dog in order to illustrate two very different conceptions of the philosopher. Although in both cases the analogy of the dog is used to exemplify and explain certain moral or psychological characteristics of the philosopher, the author argues that the differences between Diogenes’ and Plato’s usages of the analogy are both more essential and more philosophically significant. Thus, against those scholars who claim that (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28. ALCINOO, "EXPOSICIÓN DIDÁCTICA DE LAS DOCTRINAS DE PLATÓN". Introducción, traducción y notas de una selección de capítulos.Gabriel Martino - 2014 - Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofia 40 (1):1-40.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Leonard Cohen as a Guide to Life.Brendan Shea - 2014 - In Jason Holt (ed.), Leonard Cohen and Philosophy: Various Positions. Open Court. pp. 3-15.
    As any fan of Leonard Cohen will tell you, many of his songs are deeply “philosophical,” in the sense that they deal reflectively and intelligently with the many of the basic issues of everyday human life, such as death, sex, love, God, and the meaning of life. It may surprise these same listeners to discover that much of academic philosophy (both past and present) has relatively little in common with this sort of introspective reflection, but is instead highly abstract, methodologically (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Der Mensch zwischen Weltflucht und Weltverantwortung: Lebensmodelle der paganen und der jüdisch-christlichen Antike.Jula Wildberger - 2014 - In Heinz-Günther Nesselrath & Meike Rühl (eds.), Der Mensch zwischen Weltflucht und Weltverantwortung: Lebensmodelle der paganen und der jüdisch-christlichen Antike. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck. pp. 85-109.
    Considers the paradox of demonstrative retreat from public life, as illustrated by scenes like Sen. Ep. 78.20f. and Epict. 3.22.23 with ailing philosophers almost scurrilously eager to display their heroism. Why would a philosopher want to withdraw and, at the same time, make a show of his withdrawal? How can this kind of exemplarity fulfill its therapeutic function? And how is this kind of communication, with one’s back turned to the audience, as it were, supposed to work? Tacitus’ narrative of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Christopher Stead.Catherine Rowett - 2013 - Studia Patristica 53 (1):17-30.
    Professor Christopher Stead was Ely Professor of Divinity from 1971 until his retirement in 1980 and one of the great contributors to the Oxford Patristic Conferences for many years. In this paper I reflect on his work in Patristics, and I attempt to understand how his interests diverged from the other major contributors in the same period, and how they were formed by his philosophical milieu and the spirit of the age. As a case study to illustrate and diagnose his (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. A Free Will: Origins of the Notion in Ancient Thought (Review). [REVIEW]Susanne Bobzien - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):292-293.
    Much of chapters 2 to 6 of this book is in agreement with publications from the last twenty years (including those of the reviewer); so for example Frede’s points that neither Aristotle nor the Stoics had a notion of free-will; that in Epictetus (for the first time) the notions of freedom and will were combined; that an indeterminist notion of free-will occurs first in Alexander. The achievement of these chapters lies in the way Frede carefully joins them together and uses (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Epicureanism by Tim O'Keefe. [REVIEW]Monte Johnson - 2012 - Aestimatio 9:108.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Ancient Models of Mind: Studies in Human and Divine Rationality. Edited by Andrea Nightingale and David Sedley. [REVIEW]Tamer Nawar - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):461-467.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. From Skepticism to Paralysis: The Apraxia Argument in Cicero’s Academica.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):369-392.
    This paper analyzes the apraxia argument in Cicero’s Academica. It proposes that the argument assumes two modes: the evidential mode maintains that skepticism is false, while the pragmatic claims that it is disadvantageous. The paper then develops a tension between the two modes, and concludes by exploring some differences between ancient and contemporary skepticism.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36. Philosophische Texte im Altsprachlichen Unterricht.Magnus Frisch - 2011 - Forum Schule. Mitteilungsblatt des Hessischen Altphilologenverbandes 58:28-36.
    Der Aufsatz befasst sich mit der Lektüre philosophischer Texte im Latein- und Griechischunterricht. Er diskutiert Kriterien der Themen- und Textauswahl; erörtert Möglichkeiten der Motivierung der Schüler zur aktiven Auseinandersetzung mit philosophischen Themen und Texten sowie die Möglichkeit der Behandlung philosophischer Themen und Texte bereits in der Lehrbuchphase.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Looking for the Lazy Argument Candidates.Vladimir Marko - 2011 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 18 (3 & 4):363-383; 447-474.
    The Lazy Argument, as it is preserved in historical testimonies, is not logically conclusive. In this form, it appears to have been proposed in favor of part-time fatalism (including past time fatalism). The argument assumes that free will assumption is unacceptable from the standpoint of the logical fatalist but plausible for some of the nonuniversal or part-time fatalists. There are indications that the layout of argument is not genuine, but taken over from a Megarian source and later transformed. The genuine (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38. “Exemplary Deaths in the Peloponnese: Plutarch’s Study of Death and its Revision by Georgius Trapezuntius Cretensis».Georgios Steiris - 2011 - Honouring the Dead in the Peloponesse, Proceedings of the Conference Held at Sparta 23-26 April 2009.
    This article examines the philosophical position of Plutarch on death through the way that he faces the deaths of prominent and non-prominent Lacedaemonians. Then, an analysis of Plutarch's positions by Georgius Trapezuntius in the Renaissance period is attempted, so as to illustrate the degree and the method of using the classical philosophical thought in the Renaissance.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Consciousness as a Topic of Investigation in Western Thought.Anderson Weekes - 2010 - In Michel Weber & Anderson Weekes (eds.), Process Approaches to Consciousness in Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. State University of New York Press. pp. 73-136.
    Terms for consciousness, used with a cognitive meaning, emerged as count nouns in the 17th century. This transformation repeats an evolution that had taken place in late antiquity, when related vocabulary, used in the sense of conscience, went from being mass nouns designating states to count nouns designating faculties possessed by every individual. The reified concept of consciousness resulted from the rejection of the Scholastic-Aristotelian theory of mind according to which the mind is not a countable thing, but a pure (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Nota Sobre Galeno, a Noção de Saúde e o Debate Mésdico-Filosófico sobre a Causalidade.Flavio Fontenelle Loque - 2009 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 3:59-68.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41. Cynics: Ancient Philosophies, 3. [REVIEW]Seamus O'Neill - 2009 - Mouseion 9 (3):376-379.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Cícero, Plutarco e Galeno: sobre a possibilidade de uma therapeia das paixões.Miriam Peixoto - 2008 - Hypnos. Revista Do Centro de Estudos da Antiguidade 21:153-177.
    Examinamos as respostas apresentadas por Cícero, Plutarco e Galeno, representantes da filosofia da época imperial, à pergunta pela possibilidade e legitimidade de uma therapeia das paixões. Tomando como ponto de partida uma reflexão sobre a natureza da alma e o estatuto das paixões, eles reacenderam o debate que remonta à poesia épica, na cena em que Aquiles se vê às voltas com o apelo de Atena para que acalme seu coração. Para tanto elegemos os seguintes textos: de Cícero, o livro (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Lo strabismo dello storico (fra gli antichi e noi). Intervista teorico-biografica. A cura di Marco Solinas.Mario Vegetti & Marco Solinas - 2008 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 21 (3):529-568.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Review of K. Algra, J. Barnes, J. Mansfeld, and M. Schofield (Eds.), The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy (CUP, 1999/2005). [REVIEW]Diego E. Machuca - 2007 - Philosophy in Review 27 (4):237-239.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Sekstus Empiryk, Przeciw Uczonym, Przekład I Opracowanie (Sextus Empiricus, Against the Professors, Introduction and Translation).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2007 - Wydawnictwo Marek Derewiecki.
    This is the Polish translation with introduction and commentary in the footnotes of Sextus Empiricus' work "Against the Professors" (AM I-VI).
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. From Epicurus to Epictetus: Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy.A. A. Long - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    A. A. Long, one of the world's leading writers on ancient philosophy, presents eighteen essays on the philosophers and schools of the Hellenistic and Roman periods--Epicureans, Stoics, and Sceptics. The discussion ranges over four centuries of innovative and challenging thought in ethics and politics, psychology, epistemology, and cosmology.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  47. El escepticismo ético de Sexto Empírico.Diego E. Machuca - 2006 - Dissertation, Universidad de Buenos Aires
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. “Traktat "Przeciw retorom” Sekstusa Empiryka (Sextus Empiricus' treatise "Against the Rhetoricians").Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2006 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia (1):135-147.
    This is the introduction and Polish translation of Sextus Empiricus "Against the Rhetoricians" (part) (Adversus Mathematicos book II).
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Bien, sphere et hebdomades: L'art d'écrire chez Boèce et Proclus.Jean-Luc Solere - 2003 - In Alain Galonnier (ed.), Boèce ou la Chaîne des Savoirs. pp. 55-110.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Lo sguardo a picco: Sul sublime in Filostrato.Filippo Fimiani - 2002 - Studi di Estetica 26:147-170.
    This paper is dedicated to the Εἰκόνες of the two Philostrati and to the Ἐκφράσεις of Callistratus, that is to say to three Greek works that bear important witness to the genre of art criticism in Antiquity and which concern both literary history and the history of art. The first series of Εἰκόνες is the work of Philostratus the Elder (2nd-3rd century AD) and comprises sixty-five descriptions of paintings with mythological subjects, which the author assures us he has seen in (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 56