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  1. added 2019-03-15
    Realism in Film: Less is More.Jiri Benovsky - 2017 - Dialogue 56 (1):131-141.
    What is realism in film? Focusing on a test case of HFR high-definition movies, I discuss in this article various types of realism as well as their interrelations. Precision, recessiveness of the medium, transparency, and 'Collapse' are discussed and compared. At the end of the day, I defend the claim that 'less is more' in the sense that more image precision can actually have a negative impact on storytelling.
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  2. added 2018-02-17
    Devices of Shock: Adorno's Aesthetics of Film and Fritz Lang's Fury.Ryan Drake - 2009 - Télos 2009 (149):151-168.
    Two critical yet comic elements, beyond the more obvious narrative of persecution, reveal themselves in Adorno's recorded nightmare. The first is comic because it so aptly displays his relentless critical impulse despite himself, the way in which theory invades the private sphere of his dreams: even in sleep, Adorno finds himself at once reading phenomena and on guard against a false transcendence from which they could, in the last instance, be deciphered.1 The second is more patently absurd, yet perhaps more (...)
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  3. added 2016-06-16
    Special Effects, Special Status: Lie, Visual Effects, and Stephen Prince's Perceptual Realism.Becky Vartabedian - 2008 - Cinemascope 10.
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  4. added 2015-11-03
    Torture Pornopticon: (In)Security Cameras, Self-Governance and Autonomy.Steve Jones - 2015 - In Linnie Blake & Xavier Aldana Reyes (eds.), Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon. I.B. Tauris. pp. 29-41.
    ‘Torture porn’ films centre on themes of abduction, imprisonment and suffering. Within the subgenre, protagonists are typically placed under relentless surveillance by their captors. CCTV features in more than 45 contemporary torture-themed films (including Captivity, Hunger, and Torture Room). Security cameras signify a bridging point between the captors’ ability to observe and to control their prey. Founded on power-imbalance, torture porn’s prison-spaces are panoptical. Despite failing to encapsulate contemporary surveillance’s complexities (see Haggerty, 2011), the panopticon remains a dominant paradigm within (...)
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  5. added 2015-09-03
    Ideology, Socratic Elenchus, and Inglourious Basterds.Ian Schnee - 2013 - Film and Philosophy 17:1-22.
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  6. added 2015-09-01
    Realism in Film (and Other Representations).Robert Hopkins - forthcoming - In Katherine Thomson-Jones (ed.), Current Controversies in the Philosophy of Film. Routledge.
    What is it for a film to be realistic? Of the many answers that have been proposed, I review five: that it is accurate and precise; that is has relatively few prominent formal features; that it is illusionistic; that it is transparent; and that, while plainly a moving picture, it looks to be a photographic recording, not of the actors and sets in fact filmed, but of the events narrated. The number and variety of these options raise a deeper question: (...)
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  7. added 2014-11-28
    The Myth of Scotland as Nowhere in Particular.John Marmysz - 2014 - International Journal of Scottish Theatre and Screen 7 (1):28-44.
    In a number of recent films, Scotland has served as the setting for dramas that could have taken place anywhere. This has occurred in two related ways: First, there are films such as Perfect Sense (2011) and Under the Skin (2013). These films involve storylines that, while they do take place in Scotland, do not require the country as a setting. Second, there are films such as Prometheus (2012),The Dark Knight Rises (2012), Cloud Atlas (2012), and World War Z (2013). (...)
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  8. added 2013-12-14
    Happy-Go-Lucky Revisited: A Response to Basileios Kroustallis.Christopher Grau - 2015 - Film-Philosophy 19 (1):1-15.
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  9. added 2013-09-30
    Fictional Truth in Digital Cinema: A Criticism Against John Dilworth.Carmina Sera Jose - manuscript
    In digital cinema, the ambiguity in the concept of representation asks us: How do moving pictures represent fictional objects? I am more concerned in the veracity of fictional objects than the representational theory of how fictional objects are generated. I claim that John Dilworth’s framework is uncritical, therefore, I will adopt an account of truth in fiction according to David Lewis. The purposes of this paper are: (1) to criticize John Dilworth’s framework, and (2) to provide Lewis’s theory as an (...)
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  10. added 2013-08-28
    Synaesthesia and Kinaesthetics.Joerg Fingerhut, Sabine Flach & Jan Söffner - 2011 - Peter Lang.
    A myriad of sensations inform and direct us when we engage with the environment. To understand their influence on the development of our habitus it is important to focus on unifying processes in sensing. This approach allows us to include phenomena that elude a rather narrow view that focuses on each of the five discrete senses in isolation. One of the central questions addressed in this volume is whether there is something like a sensual habitus, and if there is, how (...)
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  11. added 2013-03-24
    Filmästhetik und Weltsichten.Thomas Wachtendorf - manuscript
    According to a dogma mainly set up by Heidegger and Horkheimer/Adorno technology prevents the humans from reflecting their own situation in the world. Revealing the conditions of being is not only every humans main task, but even that of philosophy and art. From this point of view the motion picture taken to be merely a piece of technology is not of any worth philosophically and also not considered as art. This dogma is false. It is derived from the assertion that (...)
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  12. added 2012-12-15
    Dossier Chris Marker: The Suffering Image.Gavin Keeney - 2012 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    This study firstly addresses three threads in Chris Marker’s work – theology, Marxism, and Surrealism – through a mapping of the work of both Giorgio Agamben and Jacques Derrida onto the varied production of his film and photographic work. Notably, it is late Agamben and late Derrida that is utilized, as both began to exit so-called post-structuralism proper with the theological turn in the late 1980s and early 1990s. It addresses these threads through the means to ends employed and as (...)
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  13. added 2011-11-12
    Cultural Change and Nihilism in the Rollerball Films.John Marmysz - 2004 - Film and Philosophy 8:91-111.
    In 2002, a remake of the 1975 film Rollerball was released in theaters. It flopped at the box-office, disappearing quickly from movie screens and reappearing shortly thereafter on home video. While aesthetically horrendous, the remake of Rollerball is instructive, as it provides a point of contrast to the original film, highlighting a change in our culture’s manner of engagement with the difficult philosophical problem of nihilism. Both films share a roughly similar plot, yet in the differing manners that they explore (...)
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  14. added 2011-05-10
    An Eliminativist Theory of Suspense.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2011 - Philosophy and Literature 35 (1):121-133.
    Motivating philosophical interest in the notion of suspense requires comparatively little appeal to what goes on in our ordinary work-a-day lives. After all, with respect to our everyday engagements with the actual world suspense appears to be largely absent—most of us seem to lead lives relatively suspense-free. The notion of suspense strikes us as interesting largely because of its significance with respect to our engagements with (largely fictional) narratives. So, when I indicate a preference for suspense novels, I indicate a (...)
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