View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories

314 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
1 — 50 / 314
Material to categorize
  1. How Not to Make Trade-Offs Between Health and Other Goods.Antti Kauppinen - manuscript
    In the context of a global pandemic, there is good health-based reason for governments to impose various social distancing measures. However, in addition to health benefits, such measures also cause economic and other harms. In this paper, I look at proposals to make use of existing QALY (quality-adjusted life year) valuations and WELLBYs (wellbeing-adjusted life-years) as the currency for making trade-offs between health and other goods. I argue that both methods are problematic. First, whether the costs and benefits are translated (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. AI Methods in Bioethics.Joshua August Skorburg, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Vincent Conitzer - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics: Empirical Bioethics 1 (11):37-39.
    Commentary about the role of AI in bioethics for the 10th anniversary issue of AJOB: Empirical Bioethics.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Are You Ready to Meet Your Baby? Phenomenology, Pregnancy, and the Ultrasound.Casey Rentmeester - 2020 - Journal of Applied Hermeneutics 2 (2020):1-13.
    Iris Marion Young’s classic paper on the phenomenology of pregnancy chronicles the alienating tendencies of technology-ridden maternal care, as the mother’s subjective knowledge of the pregnancy gets overridden by the objective knowledge provided by medical personnel and technological apparatuses. Following Fredrik Svenaeus, the authors argue that maternal care is not necessarily alienating by looking specifically at the proper attention paid by sonographers in maternal care when performing ultrasound examinations. Using Martin Heidegger’s philosophy as a theoretical lens, the authors argue that (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The understanding of pain in bioethics thought.Carlos Alberto Rosas Jimenez - 2013 - Persona. Revista Iberoamericana de Personalismo Comunitario 1 (22):83-86.
    We can say that it is necessary for every human being to walk towards the comprehension of the contingent and limited reality of the human person, starting with those whose work involves dealing with patients, as well as those who dedicate themselves to bioethical reflection, and even the patients themselves. In this way, at the time when these people face a situation of pain and suffering, they will be able to assume it with integrity and strength, always choosing to protect (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Medical Overtesting and Racial Distrust.Luke Golemon - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (3):273-303.
    The phenomenon of medical overtesting in general, and specifically in the emergency room, is well-known and regarded as harmful to both the patient and the healthcare system. Although the implications of this problem raise myriad ethical concerns, this paper explores the extent to which overtesting might mitigate race-based health inequalities. Given that medical malpractice and error greatly increase when the patients belong to a racial minority, it is no surprise that the mortality rate similarly increases in proportion to white patients. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Moral Normative Force and Clinical Ethics Expertise.Parker Crutchfield - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (11):89-91.
    Brummett and Salter propose a useful and timely taxonomy of clinical ethics expertise (2019). As the field becomes further “professionalized” this taxonomy is important, and the core of it is right. It needs some refinement around the edges, however. In their conclusion, Brummett and Salter rightly point out that there is a significant difference between the ethicist whose recommendations are procedure- and process-heavy, consensus-driven, and dialogical and the authoritarian ethicist whose recommendations flow from “private moral views” (Brummett and Salter, 2019). (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Questionable Benefits and Unavoidable Personal Beliefs: Defending Conscientious Objection for Abortion.Bruce Philip Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (46):178-182.
    Conscientious objection in healthcare has come under heavy criticism on two grounds recently, particularly regarding abortion provision. First, critics claim conscientious objection involves a refusal to provide a legal and beneficial procedure requested by a patient, denying them access to healthcare. Second, they argue the exercise of conscientious objection is based on unverifiable personal beliefs. These characteristics, it is claimed, disqualify conscientious objection in healthcare. Here, we defend conscientious objection in the context of abortion provision. We show that abortion has (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8. Using Animal-Derived Constituents in Anaesthesia and Surgery: The Case for Disclosing to Patients.Daniel Rodger & Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-9.
    Animal-derived constituents are frequently used in anaesthesia and surgery, and patients are seldom informed of this. This is problematic for a growing minority of patients who may have religious or secular concerns about their use in their care. It is not currently common practice to inform patients about the use of animal-derived constituents, yet what little empirical data does exist indicates that many patients want the opportunity to give their informed consent. First, we review the nature and scale of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Physician Ethics: How Billing Relates to Patient Care.Saba Fatima - 2019 - Journal of Hospital Ethics 5 (3):104-108.
    Medical billing has become so intertwined with patient care, that in order to be truly committed to the physician's telos of managing a patient's medical suffering, it is imperative that physician ought to reexamine many of the ethical considerations about billing.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. An Introduction to Ethical Theory for Healthcare Assistants.Daniel Rodger & Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2017 - British Journal of Healthcare Assistants 11 (11):556-561.
    This article will explore and summarise the four main ethical theories that have relevance for healthcare assistants. These are utilitarianism, deontology, virtue ethics, and principlism. Understanding different ethical theories can have a number of significant benefits, which have the potential to shape and inform the care of patients, challenge bad practice and lead staff to become better informed about areas of moral disagreement.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. "Common Arguments About Abortion" and "Better (Philosophical) Arguments About Abortion".Nathan Nobis & Kristina Grob - 2019 - Introduction to Ethics: An Open Educational Resource.
    Two chapters -- "Common Arguments about Abortion" and "Better (Philosophical) Arguments About Abortion" -- in one file, from the open access textbook "Introduction to Ethics: An Open Educational Resource" edited by Noah Levin. -/- Adults, children and babies are arguably wrong to kill, fundamentally, because we are conscious, aware and have feelings. Since early fetuses entirely lack these characteristics, we argue that they are not inherently wrong to kill and so most abortions are not morally wrong, since most abortions are (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Severity as a Priority Setting Criterion: Setting a Challenging Research Agenda.Mathias Barra, Mari Broqvist, Erik Gustavsson, Martin Henriksson, Niklas Juth, Lars Sandman & Carl Tollef Solberg - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 1:1-20.
    Priority setting in health care is ubiquitous and health authorities are increasingly recognising the need for priority setting guidelines to ensure efficient, fair, and equitable resource allocation. While cost-effectiveness concerns seem to dominate many policies, the tension between utilitarian and deontological concerns is salient to many, and various severity criteria appear to fill this gap. Severity, then, must be subjected to rigorous ethical and philosophical analysis. Here we first give a brief history of the path to today’s severity criteria in (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Metrics of Patient, Public, Consumer, and Community Engagement in Healthcare Systems: How Should We Define Engagement, What Are We Measuring, and Does It Matter for Patient Care? Comment on "Metrics and Evaluation Tools for Patient Engagement in Healthcare Organization- and System-Level Decision-Making: A Systematic Review". [REVIEW]Zackary Berger - 2018 - International Journal of Health Policy and Management 8:49-50.
    In a rigorous systematic review, Dukhanin and colleagues categorize metrics and evaluative tools of the engagement of patient, public, consumer, and community in decision-making in healthcare institutions and systems. The review itself is ably done and the categorizations lead to a useful understanding of the necessary elements of engagement, and a suite of measures relevant to implementing engagement in systems. Nevertheless, the question remains whether the engagement of patient representatives in institutional or systemic deliberations will lead to improved clinical outcomes (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Presenters or Patients? A Crucial Distinction in Individual Health Assessments.G. Owen Schaefer - 2018 - Asian Bioethics Review 10 (1):67-73.
    Individual health assessments (IHAs) for asymptomatic individuals provide a challenge to traditional distinctions between patient care and non-medical practice. They may involve undue radiation exposure, lead to false positives, and involve high out-of-pocket costs for recipients. A recent paper (Journal of the American College of Radiology 13(12): 1447–1457.e1, 2016) has criticised the use of IHAs and argued that recipients should be classified as ‘presenters’, not ‘patients’, to distinguish it from regular medical care. I critique this classificatory move, on two grounds: (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Unfit Women: Freedom and Constraint in the Pursuit of Health.Talia Welsh - 2013 - Janus Head: Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature, Continental Philosophy, Phenomenological Psychology, and the Arts 4 (13):58-77.
    Feminist phenomenology has contributed significantly to understanding the negative impact of the objectification of women’s bodies. The celebration of thin bodies as beautiful and the demonization of fat bodies as unattractive is a common component of that discussion. However, when one turns toward the correlation of fat and poor health, a feminist phenomenological approach is less obvious. In this paper, previous phenomenological work on the objectification of women is paralleled to the contemporary encouragement to discipline one’s body in order to (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Exercise Prescription and The Doctor's Duty of Non-Maleficence.Jonathan Pugh, Christopher Pugh & Julian Savulesu - 2017 - British Journal of Sports Medicine 51 (21):1555-1556.
    An abundance of data unequivocally shows that exercise can be an effective tool in the fight against obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Indeed, physical activity can be more effective than widely-used pharmaceutical interventions. Whilst metformin reduces the incidence of diabetes by 31% (as compared with a placebo) in both men and women across different racial and ethnic groups, lifestyle intervention (including exercise) reduces the incidence by 58%. In this context, it is notable that a group of prominent medics and exercise (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. How Autonomy Can Legitimate Beneficial Coercion.Lucie White - 2017 - In Jakov Gather, Tanja Henking, Alexa Nossek & Jochen Vollmann (eds.), Beneficial Coercion in Psychiatry? Foundations and Challenges. Münster: Mentis. pp. 85-99.
    Respect for autonomy and beneficence are frequently regarded as the two essential principles of medical ethics, and the potential for these two principles to come into conflict is often emphasised as a fundamental problem. On the one hand, we have the value of beneficence, the driving force of medicine, which demands that medical professionals act to protect or promote the wellbeing of patients or research subjects. On the other, we have a principle of respect for autonomy, which demands that we (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18. The New Medical Model: A Renewed Challenge for Biomedicine.Jonathan Fuller - 2017 - Canadian Medical Association Journal 189:E640-1.
    Over the past 25 years, several new “medicines” have come screeching onto health care’s various platforms, including narrative medicine, personalized medicine, precision medicine and person-centred medicine. Philosopher Miriam Solomon calls the first three of these movements different “ways of knowing” or “methods,” and argues that they are each a response to shortcomings of methods that came before them. They should also be understood as reactions to the current dominant model of medicine. In this article, I will describe our dominant model, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Falsely, Sanely, Shallowly: Reflections on the Special Character of Grief.Janet McCracken - 2005 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):139-156.
    Our reluctance to demystify grief is a sign of the distinctive obligation and discomfort that people feel towards those who have died. These feelings, however, are instructive about the nature of grief. As a vehicle of a living person’s relation to the dead, grief is mysterious—and we are rightly reluctant to take that mystery away. But grief is not to be avoided by philosophy on that account. I defend a less Romantic view of grief, in which a grieving person’s experience (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  20. Managing the Ethical Dimensions of Brain-Computer Interfaces in eHealth: An SDLC-Based Approach.Matthew E. Gladden - 2016 - In Demetris Vrontis, Yaakov Weber & Evangelos Tsoukatos (eds.), Proceedings of the 9th Annual EuroMed Academy of Business Conference: Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Digital Ecosystems (EUROMED 2016). EuroMed Press. pp. 889-902.
    A growing range of brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies is being employed for purposes of therapy and human augmentation. While much thought has been given to the ethical implications of such technologies at the ‘macro’ level of social policy and ‘micro’ level of individual users, little attention has been given to the unique ethical issues that arise during the process of incorporating BCIs into eHealth ecosystems. In this text a conceptual framework is developed that enables the operators of eHealth ecosystems to (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. A Rumor of Empathy: Reconstructing Heidegger’s Contribution to Empathy and Empathic Clinical Practice.Lou Agosta - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (2):281-292.
    This article takes Heidegger's design distinctions for human being [Dasein] including affectivity, understanding, and speech, and, using these distinctions, generates a Heideggerian definition of empathy [Einfuehlung]. This article distinguishes empathic receptivity, empathic understanding, empathic interpretation, and empathic speech (or responsiveness). It also looks at characteristic breakdowns.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  22. Suffering and the Healing Art of Medicine.Caroline Ong - 2015 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 21 (1):6.
    Ong, Caroline Whilst the reason and purpose of suffering may never be fully understood, there are ways of enduring, transcending and growing resilience to how it affects us. Our experience of suffering lies in the web of perceptions that involve our physical, spiritual and cosmological beliefs. Referencing Pain Seeking Understanding: Suffering, Medicine and Faith, edited by Margaret E. Mohrmann and Mark J. Hanson, this article gives a brief exploration of some propositions as to why an all-powerful, good God would allow (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. With All Due Caution: Global Anti-Obesity Campaigns and the Individualization of Responsibility.Alison Reiheld - 2015 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (2):226-249.
    Obesity is one of several targets of public health efforts related to availability of and access to healthy foods. The tension between individual food decisions and social contexts of food production, preparation, and consumption makes targeting individuals deeply problematic and yet tempting. Such individualization of responsibility for obesity and nutrition is unethical and impractical. This article warns public health campaigns against giving into the temptation to individualize responsibility, and presents an argument for why they should proceed with all due caution, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24. Klinische Phänomenologie und therapeutische Situation.Ulrich Diehl & Hermes Andreas Kick - 1998 - Fundamenta Psychiatrica 12:53-57.
    Phänomenologie intendiert allgemein eine Beschreibung und intersubjektiv nachvollziehbare Analyse der in einer konkreten Situation sich erschließenden Phänomene des menschlichen Bewußtseins. Klinische Phänomenologie hat darüber hinaus die therapeutische Situation zu berücksichtigen. Im Folgenden wird die These vertreten, daß die psychische Verfassung eines Menschen niemals allein aufgrund einer rein phänomenologischen Analyse auf alle praktisch und therapeutisch relevanten Konsequenzen hin ergründet werden kann. Das kann insbesondere dann nicht der Fall sein, wenn sich solche Konsequenzen aus einem außerhalb der konkreten Situation gewonnenen, empirisch verallgemeinerbaren (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Relevance and Non-Consequentialist Aggregation.J. Paul Kelleher - 2014 - Utilitas 26 (4):385-408.
    Interpersonal aggregation involves the combining and weighing of benefits and losses to multiple individuals in the course of determining what ought to be done. Most consequentialists embrace thoroughgoing interpersonal aggregation, the view that any large benefit to each of a few people can be morally outweighed by allocating any smaller benefit to each of many others, so long as this second group is sufficiently large. This would permit letting one person die in order to cure some number of mild headaches (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  26. Managing Antimicrobial Resistance In Food Production: Conflicts Of Interest And Politics In The Development Of Public Health Policy.Bryn Williams-Jones & Béatrice Doize - 2010 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 5 (1):156-169.
    Antimicrobial resistance is a growing public health concern and is associated with the over - or inappropriate use of antimicrobials in both humans and agriculture. While there has been recognition of this problem on the part of agricultural and public health authorities, there has nonetheless been significant difficulty in translating policy recommendations into practical guidelines. In this paper, we examine the process of public health policy development in Quebec agriculture, with a focus on the case of pork production and the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Autonomy Promotion In A Multiethnic Context: Reflections On Some Normative Issues.Michel Désy - 2010 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 5 (1):131-139.
    La conception de la promotion de la santé consacrée dans la Charte d'Ottawa accorde à l'autonomie une place centrale. Or, il n'est pas clair que la santé définie au sens large et l'autonomie soient liées au sens où semblent l'entendre les auteurs de la Charte. De plus, la promotion de l'autonomie auprès de groupes qui ne la considèrent pas comme une valeur centrale reste à justifier. Le présent texte présente une conception de l'autonomie et de sa promotion qui permet de (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Le médecin-écrivain, l’éthique et l’imaginaire.Marc Zaffran - 2010 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 5 (1):83-100.
    Les médecins qui écrivent sont nombreux à travers le monde, mais les relations entre expérience professionnelle des soignants et écriture de fiction sont plus largement étudiés et reconnus dans le monde littéraire et médical anglophone que dans l'espace francophone. À travers l'examen de quatre romans d'un médecin-écrivain français publiant depuis 1989 et à la faveur d'un entretien inédit, cet article s'interroge sur la manière dont l'expérience professionnelle d'un praticien peut nourrir ses fictions et y transmettre les conceptions de l'auteur sur (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Deception in Social Science Research: Is Informed Consent Possible?Alan Soble - 1978 - Hastings Center Report 8 (5):40-46.
    Deception of subjects is used frequently in the social sciences. Examples are provided. The ethics of experimental deception are discussed, in particular various maneuvers to solve the problem. The results have implications for the use of deception in the biomedical sciences.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  30. Real and Alleged Problems for Daniels's Account of Health Justice.J. Paul Kelleher - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (4):388-399.
    Norman Daniels’s theory of health justice is the most comprehensive and systematic such theory we have. In one of the few articles published so far on Daniels’s new book, Just Health, Benjamin Sachs argues that Daniels’s core “principle of equality of opportunity does not do the work Daniels needs it to do.” Yet Sachs’s objections to Daniels’s framework are deeply flawed. Where these arguments do not rely on significant misreadings of Daniels, they ignore sensible strands in Just Health that considerably (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. Causation and Melanoma Classification.Brendan Clarke - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (1):19-32.
    In this article, I begin by giving a brief history of melanoma causation. I then discuss the current manner in which malignant melanoma is classified. In general, these systems of classification do not take account of the manner of tumour causation. Instead, they are based on phenomenological features of the tumour, such as size, spread, and morphology. I go on to suggest that misclassification of melanoma is a major problem in clinical practice. I therefore outline an alternative means of classifying (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  32. Inequalities and Healthcare Reform in Chile: Equity of What?J. Burrows - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e13-e13.
    Chile has achieved great success in terms of growth and development. However, growing inequalities exist in relation to income and health status. The previous Chilean government began to reform the healthcare system with the aim of reducing health inequities. What is meant by “equity” in this context? What is the extent of the equity aimed for? A normative framework is required for public policy-makers to consider ideas about fairness in their decisions about healthcare reform. This paper aims to discuss the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Nursing Theorists and Their Work, Sixth Edition.John Paley - 2006 - Nursing Philosophy 7 (4):275–280.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  34. An Unexpected Opening to Teach the Impact of Interactions Between Healthcare Personnel.Alison Reiheld - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):29 – 30.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
Aging
  1. Age Change in Healthcare Settings: A Reply to Lippert-Rasmussen and Petersen.Joona Räsänen - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Lippert-Rasmussen and Petersen discuss my ‘Moral case for legal age change’ in their article ‘Age change, official age and fairness in health’. They argue that in important healthcare settings (such as distributing vital organs for dying patients), the state should treat people on the basis of their chronological age because chronological age is a better proxy for what matters from the point of view of justice than adjusted official age. While adjusted legal age should not be used in deciding who (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Consent’s Dominion: Dementia and Prior Consent to Sexual Relations.Samuel Director - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (9):1065-1071.
    In this paper, I answer the following question: suppose that two individuals, C and D, have been in a long-term committed relationship, and D now has dementia, while C is competent; if D agrees to have sex with C, is it permissible for C to have sex with D? Ultimately, I defend the view that, under certain conditions, D can give valid consent to sex with C, rendering sex between them permissible. Specifically, I argue there is compelling reason to endorse (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. The Extended Body: On Aging, Disability, and Well‐Being.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S3):S31-S36.
    Insofar as many older adults fit some definition of disability, disability studies and gerontology would seem to have common interests and goals. However, there has been little discussion between these fields. The aim of this paper is to open up the insights of disability studies as well as philosophy of disability to discussions in gerontology. In doing so, I hope to contribute to thinking about the good life in late life by more critically reflecting upon the meaning of the body, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. Fighting Aging as an Effective Altruism Cause: A Model of the Impact of the Clinical Trials of Simple Interventions.Alexey Turchin - manuscript
    The effective altruism movement aims to save lives in the most cost-effective ways. In the future, technology will allow radical life extension, and anyone who survives until that time will gain potentially indefinite life extension. Fighting aging now increases the number of people who will survive until radical life extension becomes possible. We suggest a simple model, where radical life extension is achieved in 2100, the human population is 10 billion, and life expectancy is increased by simple geroprotectors like metformin (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Blameless Guilt: The Case of Carer Guilt and Chronic and Terminal Illness.Matthew Bennett - 2018 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 26 (1):72-89.
    My ambition in this paper is to provide an account of an unacknowledged example of blameless guilt that, I argue, merits further examination. The example is what I call carer guilt: guilt felt by nurses and family members caring for patients with palliative-care needs. Nurses and carers involved in palliative care often feel guilty about what they perceive as their failure to provide sufficient care for a patient. However, in some cases the guilty carer does not think that he has (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Aging: The Indian Context.Swami Narasimhananda - 2009 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 114 (4):273-278.
    Old age in the Indian context and facing it through Ayurveda.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Music Therapy and Dementia: Rethinking the Debate Over Advance Directives.Steve Matthews - 2014 - Ethics Education 20:18-35.
    Ronald Dworkin argued that Advance Directives informed by a principle of autonomy ought to guide decisions in relation to the treatment of those in care for dementia. The principle of autonomy in play presupposes a form of competence that is tied to the individual person making the Directive. This paper challenges this individualist assumption. It does so by pointing out that the competence of a patient is inherently relational, and the key illustrative case to make this point is the case (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Self and Embodiment: A Bio-Phenomenological Approach to Dementia.Stephan Millett - 2011 - Dementia 10 (4):509-522.
    Loss of self is widely regarded to be a consequence of dementia, and this perceived loss presents a variety of problems - not least because a clear understanding of the concept of self is elusive. This paper suggests a way to cut through problems that arise because we rely on conceptions of self in our understanding of the effects of dementia. It is proposed that we can avoid reliance on the concept of self through an approach based in in bio-phenomenology. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Introduction to Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy.Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson - 2000 - Metaphilosophy 31 (5):449-451.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  1. Lowering Restrictions on Performance Enhancing Drugs in Elite Sports.Rory Warwick Collins - 2017 - Inquiries Journal 9 (3).
    This article argues that performance enhancing drugs ought to be allowed across all elite sporting competitions for athletes over the age of 16 so long as consuming them does not pose a significant risk to their health. I begin with a brief explanation of the current state of PED use in professional sports before assessing the prospect of allowing PEDs by three widely accepted measures of ethical merit: well-being, autonomy, and justice. I end with a critique of the World Anti-Doping (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. ‘Drugs That Make You Feel Bad’? Remorse-Based Mitigation and Neurointerventions.Jonathan Pugh & Hannah Maslen - 2017 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 11 (3):499-522.
    In many jurisdictions, an offender’s remorse is considered to be a relevant factor to take into account in mitigation at sentencing. The growing philosophical interest in the use of neurointerventions in criminal justice raises an important question about such remorse-based mitigation: to what extent should technologically facilitated remorse be honoured such that it is permitted the same penal significance as standard instances of remorse? To motivate this question, we begin by sketching a tripartite account of remorse that distinguishes cognitive, affective (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
Drug Addiction
  1. Opioid Treatment Agreements and Patient Accountability.Larisa Svirsky - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
    Opioid treatment agreements are written agreements between physicians and patients enumerating the risks associated with opioid medications along with the requirements that patients must meet to receive these medications on an ongoing basis. The choice to use such agreements goes beyond the standard informed consent process, and has a distinctive symbolic significance. Specifically, it suggests that physicians regard it as important to hold their patients accountable for adhering to various protocols regarding the use of their opioid medications. After laying out (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Powerlessness and Responsibility in Twelve Step Narratives.Mary Jean Walker - 2014 - In Jerome Miller & Nicholas Plants (eds.), Sobering Wisdom: Philosophical explorations of twelve step spirituality. Charlottesville, USA: University of Virginia Press. pp. 30-41.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Addiction, Identity, Morality.Brian D. Earp, Joshua August Skorburg, Jim A. C. Everett & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 10 (2):136-153.
    Background: Recent literature on addiction and judgments about the characteristics of agents has focused on the implications of adopting a ‘brain disease’ versus ‘moral weakness’ model of addiction. Typically, such judgments have to do with what capacities an agent has (e.g., the ability to abstain from substance use). Much less work, however, has been conducted on the relationship between addiction and judgments about an agent’s identity, including whether or to what extent an individual is seen as the same person after (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. Integrated Recovery Therapy: Towards an Integrally Informed Psychotherapy for Addicted Populations.Guy Pierre Du Plessis - 2012 - Journal of Integral Theory and Practice 7 (1):124-148.
    Abstract This article proposes and outlines an integrally informed 12 Step-based therapy that is adapted for treating addicted populations. Integrated Recovery Therapy (IRT) as a therapeutic orientation is an Integral Methodological Pluralism to therapy for treating addiction. Its two main features are paradigmatic and meta-paradigmatic. The paradigmatic aspect refers to the recognition, compilation and implementation of various methodologies in a comprehensive and inclusive manner. The meta-paradigmatic aspect refers to IRT’s capacity to weave together, relate and integrate the various paradigmatic practices. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Integrated Recovery Model for Addiction Treatment and Recovery.Guy Du Plessis - 2010 - Journal of Integral Theory and Practice 5 (3):68-87.
    This article outlines an integrally informed model for addictionon treatment and recover that is being pioneered and developed at Tabankulu Secondary Addiction Recovery Center in Cape Town, South Africa. Tabankulu is the world’s first inpatient Addictionon treatment center to implement an integrally informed treatment model. The Integrated Recovery model is a comprehensive, balanced, multi-phased, and multi-disciplinary approach to the treatment of and recovery from addiction. Its philosophy is derived from integrang a 12 Step abstinence-based methodology, mindfulness-based interventions, positive psychology, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 314