Results for 'Democratic education'

998 found
Order:
  1. Democratic education: Aligning curriculum, pedagogy, assessment and school governance.Gilbert Burgh - 2003 - In Philip Cam (ed.), Philosophy, democracy and education. pp. 101–120.
    Matthew Lipman claims that the community of inquiry is an exemplar of democracy in action. To many proponents the community of inquiry is considered invaluable for achieving desirable social and political ends through education for democracy. But what sort of democracy should we be educating for? In this paper I outline three models of democracy: the liberal model, which emphasises rights and duties, and draws upon pre-political assumptions about freedom; communitarianism, which focuses on identity and participation in the creation (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  2. Democratic Education in an Era of Town Hall Protests.Sarah Stitzlein - 2011 - Theory and Research in Education 1 (9):73-86.
    One central aspect of a healthy democracy is the practice of democratic dissent. For the first time in many years, dissent is being widely practiced in town hall meetings and on street corners across the United States. Despite this presence, dissent is often suppressed or omitted in the prescribed, tested, hidden, and external curriculum of US schools. This article calls for a realignment of these aspects of curriculum with both a guiding vision of ideal democracy and a realistic interpretation (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Towards Education for 21st Century Democratic Citizenry — Philosophical Enquiry Advancing Cosmopolitan Engagement (P.E.A.C.E.) Curriculum: An Intentional Critique.Desiree' Eva Moodley - 2021 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 41 (2):92 - 105.
    Doing philosophy for/with children and exposing students to multiple perspectives, exemplified within the Austrian Centre of Philosophy with Children’s implementation project of the Philosophical Enquiry Advancing Cosmopolitan Engagement (PEACE) curriculum in schooling, may offer a valuable written, taught, and tested curriculum for democratic citizenry. This paper provides an analysis that seeks to present, describe, critique, and make recommendations on the PEACE curriculum. The paper asks the question: In what ways does the Philosophical Enquiry Advancing Cosmopolitan Engagement as a 21st (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Towards Education for 21st Century Democratic Citizenry — Philosophical Enquiry Advancing Cosmopolitan Engagement (P.E.A.C.E.) Curriculum: An Intentional Critique.Desiree' Moodley - 2021 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 41 (2):92 - 105.
    Doing philosophy for/with children and exposing students to multiple perspectives, exemplified within the Austrian Centre of Philosophy with Children’s implementation project of the Philosophical Enquiry Advancing Cosmopolitan Engagement (PEACE) curriculum in schooling, may offer a valuable written, taught, and tested curriculum for democratic citizenry. This paper provides an analysis that seeks to present, describe, critique, and make recommendations on the PEACE curriculum. The paper asks the question: In what ways does the Philosophical Enquiry Advancing Cosmopolitan Engagement as a 21st (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Kizel, A. (2012). The Democratic Selective Education in Israel: Tikkun Olan or Separatism. Studies in Education, No. 6, pp. 46 – 61 (Hebrew).Arie Kizel - 2012 - Studies in Education 6:46-61.
    Democratic education is one of the significant challenges facing state education in Israel. This is one of the most sophisticated versions of alternative education, which clearly criticizes the traditional education that is centered on curricula and the assessment industry that brought the strongest expression.) This article seeks to contribute to the discussion of the place of democratic education as normalizing education. Democratic schools in Israel, as a space of opportunity and limitations. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Educating for Individual Freedom and Democratic Citizenship: In Unity and Diversity There Is Strength.Amy Gutmann - 2021 - Journal of Ethical Reflections 1 (4):17-41.
    This article addresses contentious questions concerning individual freedom and democratic citizenship education in the contemporary circumstances of multiculturalism. It suggests that educating children for civic equality is an ambitious aim for any democracy and not one that can ever be realized once and for all. It provides evidence that multicultural conditions can challenge the very aim of educating children for civic equality. It explains that democracies are variously multicultural and the varieties of groups make a difference in the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  46
    Democracy or Power of Control: Insights from Haitians and Other Educators for Leveraging the Democratic Polarities.Calixte-Hallworth Marjorie - 2024 - International Journal of Creative Research Thoughts - Ijcrt 12 (3):632-642.
    The polarities of democracy framework is founded on critical theory ideas that seek to achieve social change by overcoming oppression and violence, which both endanger humanity's survival. Benet expanded the theory by utilizing Johnson’s concept of polarity management as a conceptual framework. Viewing the polarities of democracy model as a unifying paradigm can help in organizing, leading, and evaluating democratic social change activities aimed at creating healthy, sustainable, and just communities. According to the argument, Democracy is seen as a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Democratic Equality and Public Education.Marilyn Robb - unknown
    This project seeks to address the way in which democratic citizens are equal, and the kind of equality of opportunity that follows from this notion of equality. I will then apply this theoretical discussion to public education, a fundamental component of any notion of equality of opportunity. I am asserting principles that may inform questions of equality in any democracy, but I am giving specific content to the way these ideals have been articulated in one particular democracy. Because (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Democracy and Education: Defending the Humboldtian University and the Democratic Nation-State as Institutions of the Radical Enligtenment.Arran Gare - 2005 - Concrescence: The Australiasian Journal of Process Thought 6:3 - 27.
    Endorsing Bill Readings’ argument that there is an intimate relationship between the dissolution of the nation-State, the undermining of the Humboldtian ideal of the university and economic globalization, this paper defends both the nation-State and the Humboldtian university as core institutions of democracy. However, such an argument only has force, it is suggested, if we can revive an appreciation of the real meaning of democracy. Endorsing Cornelius Castoriadis’ argument that democracy has been betrayed in the modern world but disagreeing with (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10. Democratic pedagogy.Gilbert Burgh - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 1 (1):22-44.
    The ideas contained in this paper were first formulated as part of a chapter in my doctoral dissertation, which was completed in 1997. Some years later I added to my initial thoughts, scribbled some notes, and presented them at the 12th Annual Philosophy in Schools Conference, held in Brisbane in 2002. This presentation surfaced as a paper in Critical & Creative Thinking: The Australasian Journal of Philosophy in Schools (Burgh 2003a). Soon thereafter I revised the paper (Burgh 2003b) and it (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  11. Education and articulation: Laclau and Mouffe’s radical democracy in school.Itay Snir - 2017 - Ethics and Education 12 (3):1-13.
    This paper outlines a theory of radical democratic education by addressing a key concept in Laclau and Mouffe’s Hegemony and Socialist Strategy: articulation. Through their concept of articulation, Laclau and Mouffe attempt to liberate Gramsci’s theory of hegemony from Marxist economism, and adapt it to a political sphere inhabited by a plurality of struggles and agents none of which is predominant. However, while for Gramsci the political process of hegemony formation has an explicit educational dimension, Laclau and Mouffe (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12. Financial Resources as a Critical Success Factors for Business Process Re-engineering to Achieve Academic Performance. A Case of Higher Education Institutions in the Democratic Republic of Congo.Jean Bosco Mukolo - 2023 - Universal Journal of Educational Research 2 (4):281-303.
    The paper reviewed financial resources which is a critical factor and component of Business Process Re-engineering in achieving academic performance of higher education institutions in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The objective of the study is to examine whether financial resources can contribute to improving and achieving academic performance of higher education institutions in general and students in particular. The study used a systematic literature review and content analysis was to establish the relationship between financial resources and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Moral traditions, critical reflection, and education in a liberal-democratic society.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2012 - In Peter Kemp & Asger Sørensen (eds.), Politics in Education. LIT Verlag. pp. 169-182.
    I argue that, in the second half of the second Millennium, three parallel processes took place. First, normative ethics, or natural morality, that had been a distinct subject in the education of European elites from the Renaissance times to the end of the eighteenth century, disappeared as such, being partly allotted to the Churches via the teaching of religion in State School, and partly absorbed by the study of history and literature, assumed to be channels for imbibing younger generations (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Democratic Deliberation in the Absence of Integration.Michael Merry - 2023 - In Johannes Drerup, Douglas Yacek & Julian Culp (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Democratic Education. Cambridge University Press. pp. 230-249.
    In order for democratic deliberative interactions in educational settings to fruitfully occur, certain favorable conditions must obtain. In this chapter I chiefly concern myself with one of these putative conditions, namely that of school integration, believed by many liberal scholars to be necessary for consensus-building and legitimate decision-making. I provide a critical assessment of the belief that integration is a necessary facilitative condition for democratic deliberation in the classroom. I demonstrate that liberal versions of democratic deliberation predicated (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. review of A Platonic Theory of Moral Education: Cultivating Virtue in Contemporary Democratic Classrooms (Routledge, 2020) by Mark E. Jonas and Yoshiaki Nakazawa. [REVIEW]Mason Marshall - 2021 - Educational Theory 71 (4):539-545.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. The Democratization of Social Media A Critical Perspective in Technology.Rangga Kala Mahaswa - 2017 - In International Conference on Religion and the Challenge of Democracy in Indonesia. Yogyakarta: Center for Religion and Science, UIN Sunan Kalijaga.
    Social Media is part of contemporary technology that is the contentious subject matter within the society. It is paradoxical when social media should provide techniques and objects that serve human being in a positive way, but at the same time, it can dehumanize human being such as alienation. The main problem is because the lack of impact of public policy, which does not involve society in the democratic sphere. The article is about the possibility of democratization social media in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Democratic Formation as the Response to a Growing Cancel Culture.Sigri M. Gaïni - 2023 - Athena 3 (1):47-73.
    There is an ongoing discussion among scholars as well as among the public about whether liberal democracies should have laws against hate speech. Proponents of hate speech laws argue that these laws play a crucial part in liberal democracies since they help ensure the protection of basic rights, such as every citizen being treated equally with respect. Opponents of hate speech laws, on the other hand, argue that hate speech laws are a threat to freedom of (political) speech and that, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Place-based philosophical education: Reconstructing ‘place’, reconstructing ethics.Simone Thornton, Mary Graham & Gilbert Burgh - 2021 - Childhood and Philosophy 17:1-29.
    Education as identity formation in Western-style liberal-democracies relies, in part, on neutrality as a justification for the reproduction of collective individual identity, including societal, cultural, institutional and political identities, many aspects of which are problematic in terms of the reproduction of environmentally harmful attitudes, beliefs and actions. Taking a position on an issue necessitates letting go of certain forms of neutrality, as does effectively teaching environmental education. We contend that to claim a stance of neutrality is to claim (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19. Why Education in Public Schools Should Include Religious Ideals.Doret J. de Ruyter & Michael S. Merry - 2009 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (4):295-311.
    In this article we aim to open a new line of debate about religion in public schools by focusing on religious ideals. We begin with an elucidation of the concept ‘religious ideals’ and an explanation of the notion of reasonable pluralism, in order to be able to explore the dangers and positive contributions of religious ideals and their pursuit on a liberal democratic society. We draw our examples of religious ideals from Christianity and Islam, because these religions have most (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  20. Literate education in classical Athens.T. J. Morgan - 1999 - Classical Quarterly 49 (1):46-61.
    In the study of education, as in many more travelled regions of Classical scholarship, democratic Athens is something of a special case. The cautions formulation is appropriate: in the case of education, surprisingly few studies have sought to establish quite how special Athens was, and those which have, have often raised more questions than they answered. The subject itself is partly to blame. The history of education invites comparison with the present day, while those planning the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  21. Free Progress Education.Marco Masi - 2017 - Indy Edition.
    Schools, colleges, and universities have become homogenizing systems that are almost exclusively focused on imposing a pre-ordered curricula through exams and grades or tight research lines. In the process, they are killing passion, creativity, and individuals’ potential and skills. Ultimately, schools and academia make up a system that serves a collective machinery but suffocates individual growth. This state of affairs is not a necessary evil. Learning, discovering and teaching can be a natural, spontaneous and luminous expressions of a free and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. The Philosophy of Social Segregation in Israel's Democratic Schools.Arie Kizel - 2013 - Philosophy Study 3 (11):1042 – 1050.
    Democratic private schools in Israel are a part of the neo-liberal discourse. They champion the dialogic philosophy associated with its most prominent advocates—Martin Buber, Emmanuel Levinas—together with Paulo Freire’s critical pedagogy, the humanistic psychology propounded by Carl Rogers, Nel Noddings’s pedagogy of care and concern, and even Gadamer’s integrative hermeneutic perspective. Democratic schools form one of the greatest challenges to State education and most vocal and active critique of the focus conservative education places on exams and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. The Limits of Critical Democratic Theory Regarding Structural Transformations in Twenty-First Century Left Politics.David Ingram - forthcoming - In Critical Theory and the Political. Manchester, UK: Manchester University.
    This chapter proposes a critical examination of ideological tendencies at work in two main democratic theories currently at play within the critical theory tradition: the deliberative theory advanced famously by Habermas and his acolytes, and the partisan theory advanced by Mouffe and others influenced by Gramsci and Schmitt. Explaining why these theories appeal to distinctive social groups on the Left, divided mainly by education and economic status, it argues that neither theory accounts for the possibility of a Left (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Improving Teacher Education Students’ Ethical Thinking Using the Community of Inquiry Approach.Mark Freakley & Gilbert Burgh - 1999 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 19 (1):38-45.
    The notion of a community of inquiry has been treated by many of its proponents as being an exemplar of democracy in action. We argue that the assumptions underlying this view present some practical and theoretical difficulties, particularly in relation to distribution of power among the members of a community of inquiry. We identify two presuppositions in relation to distribution of power that require attention in developing an educational model that is committed to deliberative democracy: (1) openness to inquiry and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Engineer education as citizenship education.Ogawa Taiji, Murase Tomoyuki & Kei Nishiyama - 2020 - In Proceedings of InInternational Symposium on Advances in Technology Education Conference. International Symposium on Advances in Technology Education. pp. 326-331.
    Engineering and technology aim to lead a better life for people. But the meaning of “better” is highly contested in modern democratic societies where different citizens have different cultures and values. Engineers, as one of the citizens in such societies, are also living in multicultural and multi-value settings, and therefore they need to be responsible for such diversity when they engage in technological developments. Therefore, in engineering education, it is necessary to aim at not only acquiring the specialized (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Political Liberalism, Autonomy, and Education.Blain Neufeld - forthcoming - In The Palgrave Handbook of Citizenship and Education.
    Citizens are politically autonomous insofar as they are subject to laws that are (a) justified by reasons acceptable to them and (b) authorized by them via their political institutions. An obstacle to the equal realization of political autonomy is the plurality of religious, moral, and philosophical views endorsed by citizens. Decisions regarding certain fundamental political issues (e.g., abortion) can involve citizens imposing political positions justified in terms of their respective worldviews upon others. Despite citizens’ disagreements over which worldview is correct, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Wellbeing and education: Issues of culture and authority.John White - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (1):17–28.
    The idea that education should equip people to lead flourishing lives and help others to do so is now becoming salient in policy-making circles. Philosophy of education can help here by clarifying what flourishing consists in. This essay examines one aspect of this. It rejects the view that well-being goods are derivable from human nature, as in the theories of Howard Gardner and Edmond Holmes. It locates them, rather, as cultural products, but not culturally-relative ones, drawing attention to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  28. Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education.F. Clark Power, Ann Higgins-D'Alessandro & Lawrence Kohlberg - 1989
    Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education presents what the late Lawrence Kohlberg regarded as the definitive statement of his educational theory. Addressing the sociology and social psychology of schooling, the authors propose that school culture become the center of moral education and research. They discuss how schools can develop as just and cohesive communities by involving students in democracy, and they focus on the moral decisions teachers and students face as they democratically resolve problems. As the authors put (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   62 citations  
  29. Ecosocial citizenship education: Facilitating interconnective, deliberative practice and corrective methodology for epistemic accountability.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15:1-20.
    According to Val Plumwood (1995), liberal-democracy is an authoritarian political system that protects privilege but fails to protect nature. A major obstacle, she says, is radical inequality, which has become increasingly far-reaching under liberal-democracy; an indicator of ‘the capacity of its privileged groups to distribute social goods upwards and to create rigidities which hinder the democratic correctiveness of social institutions’ (p. 134). This cautionary tale has repercussions for education, especially civics and citizenship education. To address this, we (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Philosophy of Tertiary Civic Education in Hong Kong: Formation of Trans-Cultural Political Vision.Andrew T. W. Hung - 2015 - Public Administration and Policy: An Asia-Pacific Journal 18 (2).
    This paper explores the philosophy of tertiary civic education in Hong Kong. It does not only investigate the role of tertiary education that can play in civic education, but also explores the way to achieve the aim of integrating liberal democratic citizenship and collective national identity in the context of persistent conflicts between two different identity politics in Hong Kong: politics of assimilation and politics of difference. As Hong Kong is part of China and is inevitably (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. The Incoherence of the Interactional and Institutional Within Freire’s Politico-Educational Project.Neil Wilcock - 2020 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 39 (4):399-414.
    In this paper I draw apart two different contexts of Freirean pedagogical practice that I label interactional and institutional. The interactional refers to the immediate learning environment with relation to the interaction between the students and the teacher. In contrast, the institutional refers to how the institutions of education are managed, constructed, and organised and how they relate to the individuals those institutions are composed of. I begin by presenting a brief overview of Freire’s argument in favour of a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. Education for Citizenship in For-Profit Charter Schools?Sarah Stitzlein - 2013 - Journal of Curriculum Studies 2 (45):251-276.
    Most Americans and many residents of other democratic countries hold public schools to the social and political goal of preparing children to be good citizens. This goal is being challenged by some new forms of schooling promoted through popular education reform movements, especially in the US. This article reveals potentially insurmountable conflicts between the beliefs and practices of one of those forms of schools, for-profit charter schools, and their public task of educating for citizenship. This study begins by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. When the State Speaks, What Should it Say? The Dilemmas of Freedom of Expression and Democratic Persuasion.Corey Brettschneider - 2010 - Perspectives on Politics 8 (4):1005-1019.
    Hate groups are often thought to reveal a paradox in liberal thinking. On the one hand, such groups challenge the very foundations of liberal thought, including core values of equality and freedom. On the other hand, these same values underlie the rights such as freedom of expression and association that protect hate groups. Thus a liberal democratic state that extends those protections to such groups in the name of value neutrality and freedom of expression may be thought to be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34. 자유민주주의적 가치의 철학적 해석을 통한 정신전력의 증강에 관한 연구 (Enhancement of Mental Force through the philosophical Interpretation of Liberal-democratic Values).Juyong Kim - 2022 - 정신전력연구 (Journal of Spiritual and Mental Force Enhancement) 68:205-254.
    Recently, mental strength education requires to change in a way that establishes a military value system suitable for a liberal democracy while facing the need to strengthen mental strength in response to unpredictable security situations. The key to fulfilling these twofold objectives lies in the fact that there is a positive correlation between the enhancement of a soldier’s democratic awareness and intangible force. Therefore, it is of great importance to emphasize the concept of ‘citizen in uniform’ as one (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Dewey, Mitra, and the “technological proletariat:” Democratizing the information revolution.John Hartmann - manuscript
    In his 1939 essay, “Creative Democracy – The Task Before Us,” John Dewey described democracy as “a way of personal life controlled not merely by faith in human nature in general but by faith in the capacity of human beings for intelligent judgment and action if proper conditions are furnished.”1 While this may seem an odd definition, it is emblematic of the reconstructive tendency in Dewey’s philosophy. If we are to achieve a truly democratic society, we must reconstruct democracy (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Making Artists of Us All: The Evolution of an Educational Aesthetic.George E. Abaunza - 2005 - Dissertation, Florida State University
    The history of philosophy is replete with attempts at invoking rationality as a means of directing and even subduing human desire and emotion. Understood as that which moves human beings to action, desire and emotion come to be associated with human freedom and rationality as a means of curbing that freedom. Plato, for instance, takes for granted a separation between thought and action that drives a wedge between our rational ability to exercise self-discipline and the free expression of desire and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Inoculation Against Populism: Media Competence Education and Political Autonomy.Frodo Podschwadek - 2019 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 6 (2):211-234.
    This paper offers an analysis of the relation between political populism and mass media, and how this relation becomes problematic for democratic societies. It focuses on the fact that mass media, due to their purpose and infrastructure, can unintentionally reinforce populist messages. Research findings from communication science and political psychology are used to illustrate how, for example, a combination of mass media agenda setting and motivated reasoning can influence citizens’ political decisions and impair their political autonomy. This poses a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. P4C and “self-education”: How can philosophical dialogue best solicit selves?Susan T. Gardner - 2022 - In Dina Mendonça & F. Franken Figueiredo (eds.), Conceptions of Childhood and Moral Education in Philosophy for Children. Stuttgart: Metzler. pp. 113-126.
    Though central to metaphysics, and exciting for entertainment, the fact that selves are invisible, has received insufficient attention in the field of P4C, and virtually none in the field of education in general. This may not be surprising as the enthusiasm to enrich “minds” both with essential information as well as with critical, creative, and cooperative inquiry skills, may blind educators to the fact that their initiatives (even those that are dialogical) may not touch how children view themselves, nor (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Criticising Humanities Today:-Framing Debates on the Value of Humanities in EU Higher Education Policy with a Special Focus on the Bologna Process.Lavinia Marin - 2014 - Dissertation, Uppsala University
    The main research question that this paper aims to answer is: ‘In what does today’s attack on humanities consist and how can humanities be defended?’ In order to answer this research question, one needs first to describe how the humanities have argued for their usefulness before the Bologna Process; second, provide reasons for the claim that the Bologna Process would be a new type of attack; and third, analyse the new defences for the humanities, so as to discuss whether these (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40. The Role of State as an Active and Informal Agency of Education.Himashree Patowary - 2013 - Pratidhwani the Echo.
    In the words of Aristotle, "The state is a union of families and villagers having for an end, a perfect and self-sufficing life by which we mean a happy and honourable life. A state exists for the sake of good life and not for the sake of life only". This definition has given a clear vision on the relationship between man and the state. The state, in modern times is regarded as an important agency or in other words a human (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. What's so Important about Music Education?(review).Leonard Tan - 2011 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 19 (2):201-205.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:What's so Important about Music Education?Leonard TanJ. Scott Goble, What's so Important about Music Education? (New York, NY: Routledge, 2010)In What's so Important about Music Education, J. Scott Goble proposes a new philosophical foundation for music education in the United States based on the theory of semiotics by American pragmatist Charles Sanders Peirce. Following a brief summary, I will note several merits in Goble's (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. COMPLEXITY, DIALOGUE, AND DEMOCRACY: THE EDUCATIONAL IMPLICATIONS.Susan T. Gardner - 2022 - Journal of Didactics of Philosophy 6 (1):1-17.
    There is an unacknowledged disagreement on what kind of dialogue best supports democracy. Many view democracy as analogous to a law court and so view “democratic dialogue” as a contest between competing advocates who have acquired the kind of “steel trap” critical thinking skills that are ideal for winning in the external marketplace of ideas. Others assume that the propensity to seriously reflect on opposing viewpoints within the minds of individuals is ideal for democratic maintenance. It will be (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. The Need for Philosophy in Promoting Democracy: A case for philosophy in the curriculum.Gilbert Burgh - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):38-58.
    The studies by Trickey and Topping, which provide empirical support that philosophy produces cognitive gains and social benefits, have been used to advocate the view that philosophy deserves a place in the curriculum. Arguably, the existing curriculum, built around well-established core subjects, already provides what philosophy is said to do, and, therefore, there is no case to be made for expanding it to include philosophy. However, if we take citizenship education seriously, then the development of active and informed citizens (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  44. Brauchen wir Political Correctness? Ein politisches Streitgespräch.Karsten Schubert, Saba-Nur Cheema, Beate Rosenzweig & Petra Barz - 2021 - Außerschulische Bildung – Zeitschrift der Politischen Jugend- Und Erwachsenenbildung 4:33-41.
    Für ein Gespräch über die Themen Political Correctness, Identitätspolitik, Streitkultur und die Rolle der politischen Bildung kamen im Juli 2021 Saba-Nur Cheema von der Bildungsstätte Anne Frank und Dr. Karsten Schubert von der Universität Freiburg in einem Zoom-Raum zusammen. Die Fragen stellten Prof. Dr. Beate Rosenzweig und Petra Barz, beide Mitglieder im Redaktionsbeirat der "Außerschulischen Bildung". Der folgende Text ist eine bearbeitete und gekürzte Fassung des Gesprächs.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. The importance of applying the philosophy program for children.Altunsöz Fadime - 2022 - Dissertation,
    The importance of the philosophy education program for children and its implementation was investigated within the framework of this study. Philosophy for Children (P4C) is a program introduced and developed by Matthew Lipman. The building blocks of Philosophy Education for Children are education, philosophy and children. In this respect, the current study analyzed the place and importance of education, philosophy, the child in history, and various related implementations, as well as how they have evolved through the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. La educación religiosa y los fines de la educación liberal. Análisis de compatibilidad.Carlos José Sánchez Corrales - 2020 - Aporía. Revista Internacional de Investigaciones Filosóficas 2019 (18):57-72.
    The present paper tries to answer the question Is religious education compatible with the purposes of liberal education? This work argues that it is possible, and desirable, that democratic states built on liberal ideals include religious education in all schools since increasing the number of options among which the future citizen may choose the conception of the good with which he or she wishes to live is a condition for autonomy as one of its educational purposes. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Ethics and Military Practice.Désirée Verweij, Peter Olsthoorn & Eva van Baarle (eds.) - 2022 - Leiden Boston: Brill.
    Democratic societies expect their armed forces to act in a morally responsible way, which seems a fair expectation given the fact that they entrust their armed forces with the monopoly of violence. However, this is not as straightforward and unambiguous as it sounds. Present-day military practices show that political assignments, social and cultural contexts, innovative technologies and organisational structures, present military personnel with questions and dilemma’s that can have far-reaching consequences for all involved – not in the last place (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Can the multitude be philosophic? – Myth, Reason, and Politics.Justin P. Holt - 2021 - Academia Letters 2846 (Article 2846.).
    In his Republic, Plato argues that self-rulership cannot be widespread enough in a populace due to structural failures of education. This means that rulership by the few with the use of manipulative mythological devices is inevitable. That is, if a populace cannot rule themselves through the use of their reason, then they will be ruled by others through the use of myth, at best, and at worst, violence. Even given this rather grim conclusion, if we closely examine what Plato (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. How the West Was One: The Western as Individualist, the African as Communitarian.Thaddeus Metz - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (11):1175-1184.
    There is a kernel of truth in the claim that Western, and especially Anglo-American-Australasian, normative philosophy, including that relating to the philosophy of education, is individualistic; it tends to prize properties that are internal to a human being such as her autonomy, rationality, pleasure, desires, self-esteem, self-realization and virtues relating to, say, her intellect. One notable exception is the idea that students ought to be educated in order to be citizens, participants in a democratic and cosmopolitan order, but, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  50. Trust, Well-being and the Community of Philosophical Inquiry.Laura D'Olimpio - 2015 - He Kupu 4 (2):45-57.
    Trust is vital for individuals to flourish and have a sense of well-being in their community. A trusting society allows people to feel safe, communicate with each other and engage with those who are different to themselves without feeling fearful. In this paper I employ an Aristotelian framework in order to identify trust as a virtue and I defend the need to cultivate trust in children. I discuss the case study of Buranda State School in Queensland, Australia as an instance (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 998